winter park magazine spring 2013

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Winter Park Magazine Spring 2013

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  • SPRING 2013 | $3.95

  • 2 WINTER PARK MAGAZINE | SPRING 2013

  • SPRING 2013 | WINTER PARK MAGAZINE 3

  • 4 WINTER PARK MAGAZINE | SPRING 2013

    8 | meet henry peter Floridas haunting landscapes enchant self-taught realist Henry Peter.

    10 | the rOLe OF A rOCK retreAt You can turn the amp up to 11 in this over-the-top, Tuscan-style showplace, where nobody has to fight for the right to party. It was designed for making music and memo-ries and for enjoying life to the fullest. By Kaleena Thompson

    16 | the LOSt GenerAtIOn Henry Patrick Raleigh captured the decadence of the Jazz Age with colorful images that wowed socialites and thrilled the literati. The illustrator died broke and forgotten, but his grandson has revived his legacy with a lavish tribute. By Michael McCleod

    48 | SOUL OF A CIty James Gamble Rogers II helped shape modern Winter Park. By Patrick W. McClane

    6 | FIrSt WOrD

    51 | DInInG

    57 | eVentS

    64 | jUSt bOb

    departments

    In eVerY IssUe

    On the COVer: The Palmer Avenue Bridge, which spans the Flamingo Canal, is one of the most picturesque spots in Winter Park. The citys canals were originally dredged to transport build-ing materials, but today provide stunning scenery for boaters. For more on the artist who captured this image, see page 6.

    sprInG 2013

    COntents

    40 | the OrACLe OF OKLAWAhAThe son of Winter Parks most renowned architect, Gamble Rogers spurned the family business and set out to live a troubadours life. In doing so, he left an enduring musical legacy. By Harold Fethe with Randy Noles

    23 | 10 hOmeSthAt mAtterThey arent necessarily Winter Parks 10 largest or even most expensive homes. But they are 10 homes that have historic significance and plenty of panache. By the Editors

    FeatUres36 | beAUtIFUL bOnnIe bUrnIts been displaced, disassembled and disrespected. But one of Winter Parks oldest homes has finally gotten a facelift that honors its 130-year heritage and preserves its eclectic charm. By Randy Noles

    SPRING 2013 | $3.95

    18 46

    34

  • 6 WINTER PARK MAGAZINE | SPRING 2013

    First Word

    hen the Winter Park Board of Trade became the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce in 1923, the group quickly released a promo-tional brochure debuting a new slogan: City of Homes.

    Well, yes and no. Winter Park has never been a city of only homes. Its distinctive appeal comes from not only its homes, but from its iconic business district, its parks, its churches and its schools.

    Todays New Urbanists are hard-pressed to improve on Winter Parks original town plan, conceived in the 1880s by an unheralded

    civil engineer named Samuel Robinson. Remarkably, the city today looks much like Robinson envisioned that it should, and remains a model for modern master-planned communities.

    Thats no accident. Winter Parks civic leaders and elected officials have a pretty solid track record of defending the unique character of the citya task that wasnt always been easy during the regions boom years.

    In the late 1950s, for example, Winter Parkers came together to fight a proposed Interstate 4 route that would have paralleled Orange Avenue and then crossed U.S. 17-92 before turning north toward Maitland. In fact, over the howls of Orlando movers and shakers who wanted the highway completed post haste, an additional route was also scuttled until a third, well west of the city, was finally adopted in 1963.

    I remember heated debates over widening and expanding Lakemont Drive and extending Lee Road eastward in an effort to facilitate traffic flow. Winter Parkers were adamant that preserving the picture-postcard charm of their city was more important than facilitating easier commutes.

    In 1980, the fortuitously named Hope Strong Jr. defeated longtime Mayor Jim Driver, per-ceived in some quarters as being too friendly to developers, using the slogan Winter Park Isnt As Much Like It Used to Be As It Ought To Be. (Strong later came up with the citys much-noticed traffic signs, which read Please Drive With Extraordinary Care.)

    More recently, there was a dustup over a proposed expansion of the Winter Park YMCA, which was opposed by residents in the surrounding Phelps Park area. The Ys last major expan-sion, in 1997, was approved in large part because the organization signed a development agree-ment promising not to expand again, and not to buy additional land for expansion purposes.

    This time, however, the City Commission failed to side with homeowners and okayed the Ys plans. Of course, a state-of-the-art YMCA is unquestionably a major community asset, and al-lowing a parking lot and a zero-entry pool at an existing recreational facility is hardly as egregious as, say, okaying a new Super Wal Mart. Indeed, most new master-planned communities covet YMCAs because they are considered to be attractive amenities.

    Agree or disagree with the YMCA decision, Im glad Winter Park is the kind of place where such a proposal sparks debate. All of which is a roundabout way of welcoming you to this issue of Winter Park Magazine, which, among other things, celebrates some of the citys most important and intriguing homes.

    As always, we invite your comments and suggestions. Email me at randyn@ohlmag.com or call me at (407) 647-0225.

    Randy NolesEditor/Publisher

    RANDY NOLES eDItOr AnD pUbLISher

    JENNA CARBERG Art DIreCtOr

    LAURA BLUHM ADVertISInG DeSIGner

    LORNA OSBORN SenIOr ASSOCIAte pUbLISher

    KATHY BYRD ASSOCIAte pUbLISher

    RONA GINDIN, PATRICK W. MCCLANE, MICHAEL MCLEOD, BOB MORRIS, STEVE RAJTAR,

    KALEENA THOMPSON COntrIbUtInG WrIterS

    RAFAEL TONGOL, PETER SCHREYER COntrIbUtInG phOtOGrApherS

    ASHLEY ANNIN, DANNY ROMERO eDItOrIAL InternS

    GULFSHORE MEDIA

    DANIEL DENTON preSIDent

    RANDY NOLES COnSULtInG pUbLISher

    PAM FLANAGAN GenerAL mAnAGer

    PAM DANIEL eDItOrIAL DIreCtOr

    NORMA MACHADO prODUCtIOn mAnAGer

    Copyright 2013 by Florida Home Media LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Gulfshore Media LLC. SAll rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is pro-hibited without written permission of the copyright holder. Winter Park Magazine is published three times yearly by Florida Home Media LLC, 2700 Westhall Lane, Suite 128, Maitland, FL 32751

    (407) 647-0225 WInterpArKmAG.COm

    Its a CItY OF HOmes,and sO mUCH mOre

    WWinter Parkers were adamant that preserving the

    picture-postcard charm of their city was more important than facilitating easier commutes.

    FLOrIDA hOme meDIAS FAmILy OF pUbLICAtIOnS

  • SPRING 2013 | WINTER PARK MAGAZINE 7

  • 8 WINTER PARK MAGAZINE | SUMMER 2012

    Cover Artist

    MEET HENRY PETERhis issues cover artist, Henry Peter, 63, lives and maintains a studio in Titusville. He was born and grew up in Burglengenfeld, Germany, and moved with his family to Englewood, N.Y., when he was 10. Although he began taking oil-painting lessons at 12 from a local artist, and showed considerable aptitude, he didnt pursue art in college.

    Instead he earned a degree in philosophy at what is now Franciscan University in Steubenville, Ohio, and subsequently worked as a bartender, baker, machinist, welder and long-haul truck driver. Married and with his own trucking company, Peter put painting aside until 1988, when he began entering shows and winning awards.

    He first visited Florida in 1993 to display his work at the Key West Old Island Days Festival and became a permanent resident a decade later. More recently, with the encouragement of Jon Fredlund of the Fredlund Gallery in Winter Park, the self-taught artist has added wildlife art to his repertoire of highly detailed and realistic landscapes.

    Peter says that being self-taught has been an advantage for him, contend-ing that artistic vision can only be subverted when confronted with a structured learning environment. The freedom to make mis-takes, he believes, is an integral part of the creative process. Overall, its been a long, strange trip, Peter says. There have been many detours and quite a few dead-ends.

    Q. What artists inspire and influence you? A. Its almost impossible to answer that. Ive soaked up influences and been inspired by great works in muse-ums all over the U.S. and Europe. Van Gogh is one of my favorites, and Pittsburghs Carnegie Museum had an incredible cornfield painting of his, which I went to see many, many times. I was literally drawn to it and always blown away, and I know that his work has influenced me in ways that are unlikely to be apparent to most people. Im impressed by much of the work available in the various gal-leries and art festivals, by my con-temporaries and gallery mates here in Winter Park and elsewhere. I feel fortunate and grateful to be among that number.

    Q. When and where areyou most productive? A. No matter what you may have been led to be-

    lieve, it doesnt work to just wait for inspiration to strike. You need to discipline yourself to sit down and start working, preferably on a daily basis. The great thing about that is that nothing stimulates the creative process more than doing something creative, and once you start, the rest just happens. Ill no sooner start working on a piece than I invariably get ideas for others. The trick for me is to always start more than I finish, so theres always something to work on for those days when I need a bit of an inspirational kick-start. If that doesnt do it, Ill stretch canvas, do some other prep work or maybe grab my sketchbook and camera and head out to the wetlands. Having said all that, I admit that sometimes the best ideas seem to come right out of the blue, and often at very incon-venient times. You have to seize those whenever you can.

    Q. What are your favorite subjects?