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  • What is figurative language?

    Language that communicates meanings

    beyond the literal meanings of words

  • Why do writers use figurative

    language?

    Used to create effects, to emphasize

    ideas, and to evoke emotions in readers

  • Types of Figurative Language

    Simile

    Metaphor

    Hyperbole

    Personification

    Onomatopoeia

  • Simile

    Comparison between two unlike things

    using the word like or as

    Examples:

    Mr. Saunders is as tall as a tree.

    The willow is like a nymph with streaming

    hair

    -Eve Merriam, Simile: Willow and Gingko

  • Simile - Practice

    O my Luve's like a red, red rose

    That's newly sprung in June

    O my Luves like the melodie

    That's sweetly played in tune.

    -Robert Burns, O My Luve's Like a Red, Red Rose

    Identify the similes.

    What is the speaker saying about his love?

  • Simile - Practice

    O my Luve's like a red, red rose

    That's newly sprung in June

    O my Luves like the melodie

    That's sweetly played in tune.

    -Robert Burns, O My Luve's Like a Red, Red Rose

    What is the speaker saying about his love?

    His love is new, fresh, and sweet.

  • Metaphor

    Comparison of two things that are basically

    unlike but have some qualities in common

    Unlike a simile, a metaphor does not

    contain the word like or as

    Examples:

    Love is a sad and lonely flower.

    The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor

    -Alfred Noyes, The Highwayman

  • Metaphor - Practice

    Hope is the thing with feathers

    That perches in the soul,

    And sings the tune--without the words,

    And never stops at all

    -Emily Dickinson, Hope is the thing with feathers

    Identify the metaphor.

    What is the speaker comparing? What does it mean?

  • Metaphor - Practice

    Hope is the thing with feathers

    That perches in the soul,

    And sings the tune--without the words,

    And never stops at all

    -Emily Dickinson, Hope is the thing with feathers

    What is the speaker comparing? What does it

    mean? She is comparing hope to a bird

    to signify that hope gives us the ability

    to fly high to reach our dreams freely.

  • Hyperbole

    Figure of speech in which the truth is

    exaggerated for emphasis or a humorous

    effect

    Examples:

    I was so embarrassed I could have died!

    Here once the embattled farmers stood

    And fired the shot heard round the world...

    -Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Concord Hymn

  • Hyperbole - Practice

    Why does a boy whos fast as a jet

    Take all day and sometimes two

    To get to school?

    -John Ciardi, Speed Adjustments

    Identify the hyperbole.

  • Hyperbole - Practice

    Why does a boy whos fast as a jet

    Take all day and sometimes two

    To get to school?

    -John Ciardi, Speed Adjustments

    Identify the hyperbole.

  • Personification

    The giving of human qualities to an

    animal, object, or idea

    Examples:

    The thunder boomed angrily.

    The moon smiled down on Earth.

  • Personification - Practice

    The trees shivered in the winter wind.

    Identify the personification. What does it

    mean?

  • Personification - Practice

    The trees shivered in the winter wind.

    Identify the personification. What does it

    mean?

    Trees cannot shiver. It is saying that

    the branches were moving and

    swaying because of the wind.

  • Onomatopoeia

    Sound device in which authors use

    words whose sounds echo their

    meanings

    Examples:

    I knew I was close to the farm when I heard

    the moo of a cow.

    My sister told me to gargle with salt water

    when I had a sore throat.

  • Onomatopoeia - Practice

    The whing of fathers racquet and the whack

    Of brothers bat on cousins ball...

    -Isabella Gardner, Summer Remembered

    Identify the examples of onomatopoeia.

  • Onomatopoeia - Practice

    The whing of fathers racquet and the whack

    Of brothers bat on cousins ball...

    -Isabella Gardner, Summer Remembered

    Identify the examples of onomatopoeia.

  • Other Literary Devices

    Idiom

    Oxymoron

    Alliteration

    Assonance

    Imagery

  • Idiom

    An expression that has a meaning different from the meaning of its individual words

    Typically specific to a culture

    Examples: Lets get on the ball!

    This doesnt really mean to find a ball and sit on it. We use it to mean Lets start to work or Get organized.

    Shhhdont let the cat out of the bag. This doesnt really mean to keep a cat inside of a

    bag. We use it to mean keep a secret.

  • Oxymoron

    Figure of speech that intentionally

    combines two normally contradictory

    terms

    Examples:

    Luke ate jumbo shrimp for dinner last night.

    Jacoby Ellsbury was almost safe with his

    attempt to steal second base, but Derek

    Jeter made a spectacular play to tag him

    out.

  • Oxymoron - Practice

    O heavy lightness! Serious vanity!

    Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!

    Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire,

    sick health!

    -William Shakespeare, Romeo & Juliet

    Identify the examples of oxymoron.

  • Oxymoron - Practice

    O heavy lightness! Serious vanity!

    Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!

    Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire,

    sick health!

    -William Shakespeare, Romeo & Juliet

    Identify the examples of oxymoron.

  • Alliteration

    Sound device with the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words

    Examples: Chelsi picked the darling daisies from the garden.

    Say to them,

    say to the down-keepers,

    the sun-slappers,

    the self-spoilers-Gwendolyn Brooks, Speech to the Young: Speech to

    the Progress-Toward

  • Alliteration - Practice

    And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing

    a spark

    Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet

    -Henry W. Longfellow, Paul Reveres Ride

    Identify the examples of alliteration.

  • Alliteration - Practice

    And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing

    a spark

    Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet

    -Henry W. Longfellow, Paul Reveres Ride

    Identify the examples of alliteration.

  • Assonance

    Sound device with the repetition of

    vowel sounds within nonrhyming words

    Examples:

    And the silken sad uncertain rustling of

    each purple curtain

    -Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven

    Its had tacks in it

    -Langston Hughes, Mother to Son

  • Assonance - Practice

    And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side

    Of my darling, my darling, my life and my bride.

    -Edgar Allan Poe, Annabel Lee

    Identify the examples of assonance.

  • Assonance - Practice

    And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side

    Of my darling, my darling, my life and my bride.

    -Edgar Allan Poe, Annabel Lee

    Identify the examples of assonance.

  • Imagery

    Descriptive words and phrases that

    recreate sensory experiences for the

    reader

    Appeals to one or more of the five

    senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste,

    touch

  • Imagery

    Example:

    The winter evening settles down

    With smell of steaks in passageways.

    Six oclock.

    The burnt-out ends of smoky days.

    And now a gusty shower wraps

    The grimy scraps

    Of withered leaves about your feet

    -T. S. Eliot, Preludes

  • Imagery - Practice

    This bed whose covers I straighten

    smoothing edges till blue quilt fits brown blanket

    and nothing hangs out.

    -Naomi Shihab Nye, Daily

    Which sense is most addressed in the lines

    above?

  • Imagery - Practice

    This bed whose covers I straightensmoothing edges till blue quilt fits brown blanketand nothing hangs out...

    -Naomi Shihab Nye, Daily

    Which sense is most addressed in the lines above?

    The sense of sight is appealed to the most.

  • Your Turn!

    Identify the type of literary

    device..

  • Simile

    He drew a line as straight as an

    arrow.

    He drew a line as

    straight as an arrow.

  • Metaphor

    Knowledge is a kingdom and all

    who learn are kings and queens.

    Knowledge is a kingdom

    and all who learn are

    kings and queens.

    .

  • Assonance

    He received three emails today.

    He received three

    emails today.

  • Hyperbole.

    I'd rather take baths

    with a man-eating shark,

    or wrestle a lion

    alone in the dark,

    eat spinach and liver,

    pet ten porcupines,

    than tackle the homework,

    my teacher assigns.

  • Metaphor

    Im a black ocean

    I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,

    Welling and swelling I bear

    in the tide.

    Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

    I rise

    .

  • Personification

    Thoughts entertaining.

    For days on end, her

    thoughts about him

    entertained her..

  • Alliteration

    From forth the fatal loins of these two foes;

    A pair of star-crossd lovers take their life.

    From forth the fatal loins of these two foes;

    A pair of star-crossd lovers take their life.

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