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  • Slide 1
  • WELCOME ! WELCOME ! Human Resource Management Professor Jerry Schoenfeld Professor Jerry Schoenfeld Department of Management
  • Slide 2
  • Session Overview b Introduction b What is Human Resource Management? b Why is this area of study increasingly important in todays business environment? b The FGCU HRM program goals and courses. b FGCUs student organization in HRM b Careers in Human Resource Management b Questions and Answers
  • Slide 3
  • What does an employee seek from an organization? b Job Challenge b Caring Culture b Security b Job Growth b Promotions b Empowerment b Interpersonal relations b Good pay b Benefits b Prestige b Respect b Social Responsibility b Honesty
  • Slide 4
  • What does an organization seek in its employees? b Right Job Knowledge and Skills b Dedication b Motivation b Flexibility b Growth Potential b Ability to Adapt to Change b Good Quality b Ethics b Similar Values b Good Quantity b Problem Solving b Innovation / Creativity b Dependability
  • Slide 5
  • Human Resource Management Is the process of creating policies, procedures, and practices to achieve a mutual matching of both employee and organizational needs so that employees are satisfied and the organization can achieve strategic success.
  • Slide 6
  • Some View HRM as:
  • Slide 7
  • According to a worldwide survey of 1,500 CEOs.... HRM is now the second most important function for organizational success in this new century.
  • Slide 8
  • In an age where everyone has basically the same information at the same time, the advantage goes to firms who have employees who can create a competitive advantage. Robert Goizueta, Former CEO, Coca-Cola Co.
  • Slide 9
  • Current Organizational Challenges Increasing the Importance of HRM b High Levels of Global Competition b An Increasingly Diverse Workforce b Increased Governmental Regulations b Rapid Technological Change b Changing Values of workforce b Consumer Demands for High Quality at Low Cost
  • Slide 10
  • Job Analysis Human Resource Management Forecasting Staffing Training Performance Appraisal Compensation
  • Slide 11
  • Job Analysis b A job analysis refers to studying a job in order to understand what is needed to help the job holder perform a job successfully. KnowledgeKnowledge SkillsSkills AbilitiesAbilities AttitudesAttitudes
  • Slide 12
  • Forecasting b Demand Forecasting Determining the number of employees that the organization will need at some point in the future as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities that these employees must possess.Determining the number of employees that the organization will need at some point in the future as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities that these employees must possess. b Supply Forecasting Determining what human resources will be available, both inside and outside the organization.Determining what human resources will be available, both inside and outside the organization.
  • Slide 13
  • Recruitment b The process of finding and attracting job candidates who are qualified to fill job vacancies. Internal recruitmentInternal recruitment Identifying candidates from inside the organization and encouraging them to apply for jobs that are vacant. External recruitmentExternal recruitment Advertising for and soliciting applicants from outside the organization.
  • Slide 14
  • Selection b Selection is the process of evaluating and choosing the best qualified candidate from the pool of applicants recruited for the position. b It entails the exchange of accurate information between employers and job candidates to optimize the person-job match. b Although organizations usually make these decisions, applicants also self-select by choosing to join, not to join, or to leave, organizations according to their individual needs.
  • Slide 15
  • Selection Methods b Application forms and resumes b Tests b Interviews b Physical exams and drug tests
  • Slide 16
  • Application Forms and Resumes b Application forms and/or resumes are usually the first sources of information about a potential employee. b Applications and resumes usually record the applicants desired position and job-related qualifications and experience. b Both serve as prescreening devices to help determine whether an applicant meets the minimum requirements of a position. b Both also allow for preliminary comparisons with the credentials of other candidates.
  • Slide 17
  • Written Tests b Test the applicant in a variety of areas: KnowledgeKnowledge AbilityAbility SkillSkill IntelligenceIntelligence InterestInterest
  • Slide 18
  • Performance Tests b Performance tests require the job candidate to actually perform it the job, usually in a small part or for a short time. b There are two common types of performance tests: Work samplesWork samples Assessment centersAssessment centers
  • Slide 19
  • Work Sample Performance Tests b Work samples are more appropriate for jobs that are more routine and/or more specific. b If work samples are designed and selected well, then the persons performance in the work sample should accurately predict their performance on the job. b Work samples do show high validity scores, especially when compared to written aptitude, personality or intelligence tests.
  • Slide 20
  • Assessment Center Performance Tests b Assessment centers are usually more appropriate to judge a candidates predicted performance in a more complex job. b The candidate typically is presented with a fairly large number and varying types of tasks to do (sometimes more than can reasonably be done). b The intent of the assessment center is to judge how a candidate would behave and perform in selected tasks to predict performance on the job.
  • Slide 21
  • Personality or Personal Tests b Judge whether a person fits into the organization. b The goal is to hire people who already have characteristics and attitudes that are line with the core values of the organization and its culture. b It is assumed that it is easier to teach a person the details of a job than it is to teach him or her to change deeply help attitudes or change personality characteristics.
  • Slide 22
  • Interviews b Interviews are relatively formal, in-depth conversations conducted for the purpose of assessing a candidates knowledge, skills and abilities b Interviews also provide the candidate information about the organization and potential jobs. b Interviews tend to have low validity. While many people conduct interviews, few are trained in how to do them well.While many people conduct interviews, few are trained in how to do them well. Interviews also tend to be fairly informal and no two are alike which raises issues with reliability.Interviews also tend to be fairly informal and no two are alike which raises issues with reliability.
  • Slide 23
  • Realistic Job Preview b The interviewer explains to the applicant what the job really requires rather than giving just the positive points of a job or company and avoiding the negative.
  • Slide 24
  • Physical Exams and Drug Tests b A physical exam is intended to ensure that a person is physically able to carry out certain job requirements. b A physical exam can also be used to enroll employees in fringe benefits such as health, life, or disability insurance. b Drug tests, while controversial, are used by many companies for both hiring and for continued employment.
  • Slide 25
  • Training b A planned effort to assist employees in learning job-related behaviors in order to improve performance. b Companies train employees in an effort to prepare them to work toward achieving the goals and objectives of the organization.
  • Slide 26
  • Types of Training Programs Types of Training Programs b Orientation b Technical training b On-the-job training b Management development programs
  • Slide 27
  • Performance Appraisal Performance Appraisal b A systematic process of evaluating employee job-related achievements, strengths, weaknesses, as well as determining ways to improve performance. b Uses of performance appraisal information: MotivationMotivation Personnel movementPersonnel movement TrainingTraining Feedback for improvement and personal developmentFeedback for improvement and personal development
  • Slide 28
  • Graphic Rating Scales b Assess employees on a series of performance dimensions such as: InitiativeInitiative TardinessTardiness Accuracy of workAccuracy of work b Performance dimensions on a graphic rating scale tend to be fairly general. b As a result the scales are relatively flexible and can be used to evaluate individuals in a number of different jobs.
  • Slide 29
  • Problems with Performance Appraisal b Halo Effect b Rater Patterns b Contrast Error b Recency Error
  • Slide 30
  • Direct Compensation b Base pay Refers to wages and salaries employees receive in exchange for performing their jobs.Refers to wages and salaries employees receive in exchange for performing their jobs. b Incentives Compensation beyond base pay used to attract, retain, and motivate employees.Compensation beyond base pay used to attract, retain, and motivate employees. Bonuses, commissions, profit-sharing plans, stock options.Bonuses,

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