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Weeding the Garden. From: Doug Reeves (2011) Finding Your Leadership Focus: What Matters Most for Student Results. How Do We Create a Plan That Focuses on a Few Strategies AND How Will We Implement with High Fidelity (By at Least 90% of Our Staff?). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Weeding the GardenFrom: Doug Reeves (2011)Finding Your Leadership Focus: What Matters Most for Student Results

  • How Do We Create a Plan That Focuses on a Few Strategies ANDHow Will We Implement with High Fidelity (By at Least 90% of Our Staff?)Reeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • 3 Keys to Successful Implementation

    FocusEfficacyMonitoringReeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • Laser-Like Focus: Why Weed the Garden?

    Of 21 variables studied, the combination of FOCUS, MONITORING, and EFFICACY were most powerfully related to student results

    Schools with effective monitoring and focus had TWICE THE GAINS in reading over three years compared to low focus schools

    Schools that most needed focus were least likely to have it.Webinar Title: 02/07/2011 Change Leadership in Action www.leadandlearn.com/multimedia-resource-center/webinars

  • The Focus (Stage 2: Plan) Goals, Strategies & Actions StepsEfficacyWhen staff believe that what they do in the classroom DOES predict the outcome of student achievement, their levels of stress, anxiety, and burnout are lower. Monitoring (Stage 3: Implementation)Frequent: at least every 1 -2 weeksAdult Actions must be addressedConstructive

    Reeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • What is Your Load Limit?

  • One PersonsIs Another Persons

  • What Happens When We Dont Weed our Garden?

  • 1.Toxic WeedToxic WeedsDemand a responseWe are reluctant to challenge and remove themMay look good, sound good, make people feel good in the short termOnce introduced into the environment, they strangle the life out of the other plants that we had hoped to cultivate Thistle: Deep roots, use caution when touchingReeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • 2. Unsustainable WeedUnsustainable or Programmatic WeedsCan be a meritorious ideaBecomes a weed when it is unsustainable!Can quickly move from good intentioned to chaosBamboo can grow quickly and become a weed when not carefully planning for its growth/use.Reeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • 3. Diversionary WeedDiversionary WeedsEarnest intent and good appearanceBecomes a weed when it takes time and focus away from priorityWhat we do with our time has to have an outcome related directly back to student achievementMelaleuca Tree/Brush: Takes over in Florida. Not native to USAReeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • Implementation Audit Protocol

    1. Initiative Inventory:a.) Look at each initiative listed. Start with items in the Current column. Repeat Steps 2-4 with Possible/New column. 2. Determine Impact on Student Achievementa.) Review actual student achievement and researched achievement claims. Define from Low to High.

    3. Range of Implementation:a.) Define/quantify the levels of implementation i. How much time, energy and fiscal/human resources will be needed to continue to implement at a level of at least 90%? HIGH Implementation is 90% of staff implementing with fidelity. 4. Plot results on the chartReeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

  • 2 minutes: Each person (without discussion) list the CURRENT initiatives in their district/building that are being undertaken.

    THEN, combine the individual lists into one group list.

    Definition of Initiative: Anything being undertaken that must maintain a focus, needs human and/or fiscal resources and should be monitored for implementation.

    Current Initiatives

  • Step 2: Determine Impact on Student AchievementHattie, J. (2008). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement. New York, NY: Routledge.

    Current Initiatives ListDefinition of Initiative: Anything being undertaken that must maintain a focus, needs human and/or fiscal resources and should be monitored for implementation. AchievementLow to HighLevel of ImplementationActual Student ResultsResearched ClaimsActual Level of ImplementationLow to High(High = 90%)Can we continue to provide the time, energy, resources (human & fiscal) to ensure 90% level of implementation?

  • Step 3: Determine Level of Implementation

    Current Initiatives ListDefinition of Initiative: Anything being undertaken that must maintain a focus, needs human and/or fiscal resources and should be monitored for implementation. AchievementLow to HighLevel of ImplementationActual Student ResultsResearched ClaimsActual Level of ImplementationLow to High(High = 90%)Can we continue to provide the time, energy, resources (human & fiscal) to ensure 90% level of implementation?

  • Level of ImplementationHIGHLOWHIGHLOWi.e. District mandates a specific assessment be used for short cycle assessments to use in TBTs. Negotiate that youll do SCA but can a variety be used instead.Boundaries vs. Micromanagement

    High learningHigh action able to be taken

    Low impact on learning ANDLow action on part of implementers

    We keep doing it because we always have

    You have control but there is low impact on learning.

    i.e. using a textbook from front to back even if standards arent addressed vs. only using the chapters that focus on the standards

    Negotiate ItDo It!

    Avoid ItDrop It

  • Research findings from Implementation Audits1) Non-linear relationships2) Drowning in initiatives3) Most initiatives not monitored4) Many initiatives are not linked to student achievement

    Threats to Sustainability1.) Program Orientation tradition of cycles of initiatives, boredom, death, and then comes another new initiative2.) Vocal Opposition of a few wears the leadership down3.) Political Opposition i.e. Honors classes increased in size due to improved core instruction which created large class sizes in honors which were traditionally small

    Deliberate PracticeIt takes 24 (Reeves) to 40 hrs (Darling-Hammond) of practice to apply new professional practices.Reeves, Douglas B (2011). Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.

    Weeding the Garden is an analogy that we apply in Stage 2 of the Ohio Improvement Process as we narrow and define the specific strategies and action steps that will be written as a part of our District and Building plans. We also suggest that it is used in Stage 4 every three to five years as a part of the Evaluation of your plan. Weeding the Garden is based on the work of Doug Reeves and can be found in his book, Finding your leadership focus: What matters most for student results.*One of the most important steps in Stage 2 of the Ohio Improvement Process is determining what specific strategies will be implemented based on the review of data done in Stage 1. CLICK. AND, how will we ensure it is implemented with fidelity by at least 90% of our staff?*From Doug Reeves Implementation Audit research, three critical points for successful implementation were found.*Why is having a laser-like focus so important?

    CLICK: Of 21 variables studied, the combination of FOCUS, MONITORING, and EFFICACY were most powerfully related to student results

    CLICK: Schools with effective monitoring and focus had TWICE THE GAINS in reading over three years compared to low focus schools

    CLICK: Schools that most needed focus were least likely to have it.

    You can watch a webinar by Doug Reeves if you would like additional informationWebinar address - http://www.leadandlearn.com/multimedia-resource-center/webinarsWebinar title - 02/07/2011Change Leadership in Action

    *The areas of Focus, Efficacy and Monitoring relate to Ohios Improvement Process in the following ways:CLICK: In Stage 2, having a focus is defining a limited number of goals which is no more than 2-3. Each goal will have specific strategies and action steps that operationalize the implementation of the strategies. In our work across Ohio, we have found that 1 or 2 strategies is the most districts can fully implement at one time.

    CLICK: Staff efficacy does predict outcomes for student achievement. Our belief that ALL students can achieve at high levels is critical for closing learning gaps. CLICK: Monitoring is an ongoing component in Stage 3 of Ohios Improvement Process. This is not the got ya type of monitoring. The intention is to learn what strategies are working and how we can replicate those across classrooms and buildings. The data collected during monitoring is divided into student achievement and the implementation of the strategies by the adults. Two important points that came out of the research was the fact that monitoring had to be done at least every 1-2 weeks and there needed to be constructive feedback to the adults and the students!

    *What is a building or districts load limit?

    What we fail to consider is that past practices need to be evaluated for effectiveness and officially removed from the work of the district before new initiatives are added to the load. Even bridges have load limits that must be watched. The smallest increment of extra weight can make the bridge unstable and unsafe. There is a limit to the amount of weight that can go across at the same time. Think about this with districts/schools and the amount of initiatives. You should only have 6 or fewer claimed priorities. Its a priority if it must have strong focus, needs constant attention and monitoring to ensure implementation fidelit