University of Tennessee Chattanooga Challenger Center embraces the National Science Education Standards in each of its missions so that students ... SENDING MESSAGES MISSION ... learning exciting. Students

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  • Cha l l enger Center

    Voyage to Mars

    U n i v e r s i t y o f T e n n e s s e e C h a t ta n o o g a

    2012-2013

  • January 28, 1986On the morning of the launch, the weather was freezing cold. We looked out at a clean blue sky that served as a magnificent backdrop to what appeared to be, from a distance, a small replica of the greater-sized shuttle. It glistened in the light, all white and sparkling, perhaps because of the bright Florida sun and the ice that hung from the platform, launch pad, and shuttle

    That morning, riding out on the chilly busI prayed for us all for our loved ones waiting to be launched, for those of us waiting to watch the launch, for our children, for the children around the world waiting for lessons to be taught from the classroom in space

    When we arrived at the launch Control Center, the families departed the buses and were escorted into the offices that were traditionally set aside for the immediate families of the crewWe looked out the window. We watched the TV news announcers, the NASA select channel, and our children

    We all waited. The clock ticked away each moment as though it carried a heavy burden. Finally, the long-awaited countdown began. We picked up the babies and cameras and climbed the stairs to the rooftop viewing area

    We cheered as the solid rocket boosters ignited, and the shuttle carrying its precious cargo lifted off the pad. Only a few anxious moments were left

    We watched in silence as our loved ones climbed the sky sunward. Their craft from the distance seemed to sit atop a great flume of smoke. The floor shook with the sheer raw power of the million pounds of thrust...

    Then.it happened! The unspeakable happened. Standing there together, watching with all the world, we saw the shuttle rip apart. The SRBs went screaming off on their own separate paths, the orbiter with our loved ones exploded in the cold blue sky, like our hearts it shattered into a million pieces.

    In stunned silence, we looked to each otherfor answers, for information, for hope?...

    Excerpts from Silver Linings, Triumph of the Challenger 7, by June Scobee Rodgers .

    That day, hundreds of thousands of school children and citizens were watching with anticipation the launch of this Teacher in Space mission that had captured the excitement and awe of the nation only to see a major space tragedy before their eyes. It was truly a sad day in history. But with determination and vision, the Challenger families turned this tragedy into a monumental educational opportunity for children and adults alike.

    T H E 2 5 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y

    F R O M T R A G E D Y T O T R I U M P H

    About Us

    Challenger Center is an international, not-for-profit education organization that was founded by the families of the astronauts from Challenger Space Shuttle mission 51-L.Through Challenger Center's programs and its international network of Challenger Learning Centers, the diversity, spirit, and commitment to education that exemplified the Challenger 51-L mission continues to make an impact on students, teachers, and families today. These positive learning experiences raise students expectations of success; foster a long-term interest in mathematics, science, and technology; and motivate them to pursue careers in these fields.

    Our Mission

    As new advances in science and technology occur at an ever more accelerated pace, the need for excellence in education has never been more essential. Perhaps that's one reason why so many communities throughout the world are actively engaged in developing a local Challenger Learning Center.

    Organizational History

    In the aftermath of the Challenger accident, the 51-L crew's families came together, still grieving from loss, but firmly committed to the belief that they must carry on the spirit of their loved ones by continuing the Challenger crew's educational mission.

    Excerpts from http://www.challenger.org Page 2

  • Dear Friends,

    January 28, 1986, is a day in history that stands out as one of excitement, tragedy, and remembrance. On that day, Challenger, 51-L, the Teacher in Space mission, launched into space carrying teacher Christa McAuliffe, Com-mander Dick Scobee, Pilot Mike Smith and astronauts Judy Resnik, Ellison Onizuka, Greg Jarvis, and Ron McNair. Thousands of school children and citizens were watching with anticipation the launch of this mission that had cap-tured the excitement and awe of the nation only to see a major space tragedy before their eyes. It was truly a sad day in history, but with determination and vision, we turned this tragedy into a monumental educational opportunity for children and adults alike.

    In April of that same year, the families of the Challenger astronauts met in the living room of June Scobee, widow of Commander Dick Scobee, to discuss a memorial for our loved ones. Choosing not to have a monument in stone but rather something that would continue the education that was part of the mission of 51-L, we chose to create an educational organization to inspire young people across the nation. Gathering educators, scientists, astronauts, and leaders in business and industry, we were able to create Challenger Center for Space Science Education, which be-came a network of Learning Centers that uses space as a motivator to inspire students to succeed in mathematics, science, technology, and engineering.

    These Challenger Learning Centers provide simulations in which students climb aboard a space station and work in teams to solve problems as astronauts and mission controllers in scenarios that take them through a comet, to the surface of the Moon, to a rotating platform to observe Earth, and to Mars. New scenarios are being developed to take education into new realms of excitement, creating tomorrows prepared work force. Recognized by the United States Department of Education for being a top motivator in mathematics, science, and technology, Challenger Center embraces the National Science Education Standards in each of its missions so that students receive hands-on, minds-on delivery of concepts that must be taught.

    As we begin our historic 25th year, our Challenger Learning Centers will honor the crew and commemorate their lives and legacies throughout the year in a number of events. Through the growing network of 51 Challenger Learn-ing Centers in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, the mission of the crew truly lives on. And as new centers open, we will celebrate those communities which, like our families, come together from diverse back-grounds and experiences to create opportunities to enrich and expand the education of students in a unique and fun approach.

    Our Challenger Learning Centers touch lives and create opportunities for students, our future leaders, who are the true continuation of the mission of the Challenger, 51-L. Please help us continue this mission by contacting us at the Challenger Center for Space Science Education.

    Sincerely,

    June Scobee Rogers, Ph.D. Joseph P. Allen, Ph.D.

    Founding Chairman Chairman

    L E T T E R F R O M T H E C H A I R S

    Page 3

  • F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N C A L L : 4 2 3 . 4 2 5 . 4 1 2 6

    O R V I S I T O U R W E B S I T E :

    W W W . U T C . E D U / O U T R E A C H / C H A L L E N G E R C E N T E R

  • CHALLENGER CENTER V o y a g e t o M a r s

    The 20th Anniversary 4

    Letter From the Chairs 5

    Educator Letter 6

    Mars Team Descriptions 7

    How to Match Student Abilities 8

    Mars Crew Manifest 9

    Mini Mars Crew Manifest 10

    Nametags 11

    School Mission Patch 15

    Keys to A Successful Mission 16

    Using the Software 17

    Mars Information (Excerpts from NASAs 2004 Press Kit)

    Mars At-A-Glance 20

    Where Weve Been and Where Were Going 21

    MER Overview 24

    MER Investigations 26

    Mars Student Activities

    Mars Planetary Icosohedron 29

    Mars Physical Geography Vocabulary Terms 31

    Navigating a Spacecraft 33

    Keyboarding Activity 36

    Mars Websites 38

    Program Information & Pricing

    Full and Mini Missions 41

    Extra Venue Activities 42

    Micronaut Program K-4 44

    Teacher Professional Development 46

    Inquiry Forms 50

    Directions 53

    Map 54

    T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s

    NASA FACT:

    Although at first glance it appears wrong, the

    flag on the shuttle Orbiter is not truly

    backward. The regulation for displaying a U.S. flag on a national vehicle states that the

    star field must be positioned at the front of

    the vessel (the nose cone end of the shuttle), as if the flag were "flying"

    along the side of the ship. This causes the

    flag to look as though it were backward on one

    side of the Shuttle.

    Page 5

    A T e a c h e r s P r o g r a m G u i d e

  • U s i n g t h e S o f t w a r e

    RECEIVING MESSAGES -MISSION CONTROL

    When a new message is received, the button will turn yellow and you will hear a beep. It is important that you read new messages as soon as they are received.

    Notice the message

    bar is yellow.

    This is the message

    screen. Select the

    appropriate message.

    RECEIVING MESSAGES - SPACECRAFT

    When a new message is received, the indicator on the computer will flash and you will hear a beep. It is important that you read new messages as soon as they are received.

    Page 6

  • U s i n g t h e S o f t w a r e

    SENDING MESSAGES

    MISSION CONTROL / SPACECRAFT

    Notice the subject line

    in the messages box.

    Each time you send a

    message you must enter

    a subject title.

    Page 7

  • Page 8

    Dear Classroom Educator,

    Our voyage begins in the year 2076 with a new crew of astronauts on route to the Red Planet. The purpose of their voyage is to replace the existing crew that has manned Mars Control for the last two years. Control of the incoming flight has been transferred from Mission Control, Houston to Mars Control at Chryse Station. Mars Control must safely guide the Mars Transport Vehicle (MTV) into Martian orbit and finally to a safe landing. Before returning to Earth, a probe will be launched to one of the Martian moons to gather data.

    The Voyage to Mars Mission uses the innate curiosity students have about space explorations to make learning exciting. Students flying the Mars Mission will be studying a variety of earth, space and life science topics. The Mission Prep Activity Book (MiPA) and the Mars Prep Activity Book (MaPA) have specific lessons to address each topic. Some of the basic concepts are listed below:

    1. Study of the Planet Mars (NASA Projects, physical features, etc.)

    2. Mars Geologic mapping (MaPA)

    3. Rocks and Minerals

    4. Calculating mass, volume and density

    5. Finding averages

    6. Average Temperature (MiPA)

    7. The pH scale

    8. Acids and Bases (MiPA)

    9. Weather and Climates

    10. Longitude and Latitude

    11. X & Y Coordinates (MiPA)

    12. Constellations & Stars

    13. Satellites and Probes

    14. The Solar System

    15. Plants Hydroponics (MaPA)

    16. Nutrition Mission Meals (MaPA)

    Please call (423.425.4126) if we can help you with any other educational issues regarding your mission or any of our educational activities or visit our website: http://www.utc.edu/Outreach/ChallengerCenter.

    We are looking forward to meeting you and your students.

    T h e U T C C h a l l e n g e r C e n t e r

    NASA FACT

    Have you ever heard a sonic boom? When an airplane travels at a speed faster than sound, density waves of

    sound emitted by the plane accumulate in a cone behind the plane. When this shock wave passes, a listener hears a

    sonic boom. Large meteors and the Space Shuttle frequently produce

    audible sonic booms before they are slowed to below the speed of sound by

    the Earth's atmosphere.

  • M A R S T E A M D E S C R I P T I O N S

    Team Mars Control Mars Transport Vehi-

    cle

    COM/

    DATA

    Sends verbal messages to MTV , including

    emergency messages. Manages message flow in MC.

    Manages and monitors outgoing text messages from

    all MC teams.

    Skills: 5th grade reading level, good oral

    communication, time management, and

    keyboarding skills

    Sends verbal messages to MC. Manages the

    message flow in the MTV. Manages and moni-

    tors outgoing text messages from all teams to

    include image data from the spacecraft.

    Skills: 5th grade reading level, good oral

    communication, time management, and

    keyboarding skills

    NAV

    Assist and monitors MTV; lift-off from Mars; launch

    maneuvers

    Skills: giving oral instructions, math, graphing skills,

    good time management

    Achieve Martian orbit; select a landing site on

    Mars; lift-off from Mars; launch maneuvers

    Skills: following oral instructions, math,

    reasoning

    PROBE

    Assists and monitors the construction and

    deployment of the probe.

    Skills: giving oral instruction over headset, reading

    Constructs and deploys a probe that will be

    launched to one of the Martian Moons;

    Phobos or Deimos.

    Skills: reading, following oral directions

    REM 1

    REM 2

    Records and analyzes data sent from MTV.

    Conducts research on Earth and Mars rock and

    mineral resources. Provides emergency solution

    procedures.

    Skills: interpreting data, math and keyboarding

    Collects data on mass, volume, and geological

    make-up of Earth and Mars rock samples.

    Skills: metric measurement, observation and

    keyboarding

    LS

    Records and analyzes data sent from MTV.

    Conducts extensive research and makes decisions

    regarding safety of crew.

    Skills: analysis of data, math and keyboarding

    Collects data on pH of water, oxygen tests, and

    solar panels....

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