UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS E PSpec 201314- FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR ... will then invite you in for an Applicant Day so that you ... Regular guest practitioners and

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  • UNIVERSITY FOR THE CREATIVE ARTS

    PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR:

    BA (HONS) MUSIC JOURNALISM This document is a hybrid version for 2016/171

    PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION 2016/17 This Programme Specification is designed for prospective students, current students, academic staff and potential employers. It provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the intended learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the teaching, learning and assessment methods, learning outcomes and content of each unit can be found in the Unit Descriptors.

    1ThisversioncombinesSectionAofthenew2016/17ProgrammeSpecificationtemplate(whichcombinesthefollowingsectionsoftheProgrammeSpecification2015/16:A,B,C,Fandtableofunits)andthefollowingsectionsofthe2015/16ProgrammeSpecificationforthecourse:CourseAims;CourseOutcomes;SummaryofDistinctiveFeaturesoftheCourse;Learning,Teaching&Assessment;EnhancingtheQualityofLearning&Teaching.

  • Section A Material Course Information

    Validating Body

    University for the Creative Arts2

    Final Award Title and Type

    BA (Hons)

    Course Title

    Music Journalism

    Course Location and Length

    Campus: Epsom

    Length: 3 Years

    Period of Validation

    2015/16 to 2019/20

    Name of Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body

    Not Applicable

    Type of Accreditation

    Not Applicable

    Entry criteria and requirements3

    The following qualifications and minimum requirements will be considered:

    Minimum entry criteria of 220-240 UCAS tariff points

    OR pass at UALAB Foundation Diploma in Art & Design (Level 3)

    OR pass at BTEC / UALAB Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma

    OR Access Diploma

    AND

    Four GCSE passes at grade C or above, including English or Key Skills

    Communication Level 2.

    Other relevant and equivalent UK and international qualifications are considered on an individual basis.

    Minimum English language requirements:

    If your first language is not English a certificate is required as evidence that you have an average IELTS score of 6.0 or equivalent. If you are applying as an international student from a country outside the EU and require a visa to study in the UK, you will also need a minimum of 5.5 in each individual component.

    2 Regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England 3 This should be the standard University Criteria unless otherwise approved by the Academic Board and include UCAS entry profile for undergraduate courses.

  • You may be offered a place on a course on the condition that you improve your English language and study skills. We offer pre-sessional English language courses which can improve your IELTS score by a maximum of 1.0 and 0.5, or equivalent.

    Portfolio/Interview

    For this course we assess your written application and will be making offers based on your application form, predicted qualifications, personal statement and reference. We will then invite you in for an Applicant Day so that you can visit us, meet the course team and other applicants and see the facilities.

    Overall methods of assessment4 Written

    exams:

    Practical exams:

    Coursework:

    Stage 1 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

    Stage 2 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

    Stage 3 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

    Overall Learning & Teaching hours5 Scheduled:

    Independent:

    Placement:

    Stage 1 39.2% 60.8% 0.0%

    Stage 2 32.9% 58.8% 8.3%

    Stage 3 29.6% 70.4% 0.0%

    General level of staff delivering the course6

    The Universitys current recruitment policy for Lecturers and Senior Lecturers states that they must have either an MA or equivalent professional practice in a relevant discipline or field. All lecturing staff are encouraged to work towards a teaching qualification or professional Recognition by the Higher Education Academy and this is a requirement for Senior Lecturers. Senior Lecturers are required to be professionally active or engaged in research in their discipline. All Lecturers and Senior Lecturers undertake scholarship in their disciplines. There are also Sessional Staff to

    4 As confirmed for the KIS course stage data: the overall percentage in terms of Written exams; Practical exams and Coursework 5As confirmed for the KIS course stage data: the overall percentage by stage 6 Include general information about the experience or status of the staff involved in delivering the course, for example Professor, Course Leader, Senior Lecturer

  • link courses with professional practice and Technicians to provide technical support.

    Mode of Study

    Full-time

    Part-time

    Language of Study

    English

    Subject/Qualification Benchmark Statement: Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

    The course structure The structure of all of the Universitys awards complies with the Universitys Common Credit Framework. All students are registered for a particular award. Exit awards are available to students in line with 6.7 of the Common Credit Framework.

    Unit codes and titles Level Credit value

    Elective/ Core

    If elective is this the most popular student choice?

    Year 1 EMJN4007 - Introduction to Journalism 4 30 Core EMJN4008 - Music History and Popular Culture

    4 30 Core

    EMJN4009 - Digital and Broadcast Media

    4 30 Core

    EMJN4010 - Theories of Music and Media Production

    4 30 Core

    Year 2 EMJN5007 - Music Media and Industry 5 30 Core EMJN5010 - Feature Writing 5 30 Core EMJN5011 - Magazine Project and Work Experience

    5 30 Core

    EMJN5012 - Culture, Music and Identity 5 30 Core EMJN5013 - Music Journalism Study Abroad Option

    5 30 Elective No

    Study Abroad with Host Institution 5 60 Elective No Year 3 EMJN6004 - Investigative Journalism 6 30 Core EMJN6003 - Final Major Project 6 60 Core EMJN6005 - Dissertation 6 30 Core

  • COURSE AIMS

    A1 Develop your knowledge and technical skills to practise effectively as a music journalist.

    A2 Develop the innovative and creative communication skills necessary for you to work as a professional music journalist.

    A3 Develop your independence, leadership and teamwork skills through practical situations suitable for a range of future employment opportunities.

    A4 Develop your awareness of the cultural, historical and technological context within which the practice of music journalism operates and how these determinants may affect your future work in the field.

    A5 Develop your skills of criticism, with reference to contextual meaning in your own work, and the work of others in music journalism and other fields.

    A6 Develop your research and analytical skills appropriate to further vocational or study opportunities at postgraduate level.

    COURSE OUTCOMES

    Upon successful completion of the course students are able to:

    Knowledge

    LO1 Apply your knowledge and techniques of Music Journalism with confidence and fluency.

    Understanding

  • LO2 Demonstrate your awareness of the structures and processes in music and media industries.

    LO3 Demonstrate your ability to critically analyse and evaluate the role of Music Journalism in social context.

    LO4 Identify your goals and devise appropriate study methodologies suitable for postgraduate study where appropriate.

    Application

    LO5 Locate, research and utilise appropriate sources of information to meet requirements of set and self initiated briefs.

    LO6 Demonstrate professionalism and the ability to act independently or in co-operation with others in the workplace.

    LO7 Build a network of contacts in the UK and where appropriate, internationally.

    SUMMARY OF DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE COURSE

    This course presents an exciting opportunity for students to specialise in music journalism, both in print and online.

    It embraces all areas of the media with music-related content, including magazines, newspapers, radio, television, digital and mobile technology. Drawing on the skills and expertise of journalists currently working across this diverse field, students will build a portfolio and develop strong commercial awareness, enabling them to produce work for a range of publications and outlets. It provides them with the skills to find employment in any areas of the media and music industry where the written and/or spoken word is used to persuade, inform or entertain. This could include work on magazines or newspapers as writers and editors; radio and television production, website journalism, or music PR.

    It leads to the acquisition of fundamental skills required by the professional journalist. Students also have a broad analytical understanding of the current cultural context of the written and spoken word. It equips them with a range of key transferable skills including writing, editing and subbing techniques, knowledge of IT software packages,, research skills, time management, team-working and practical organisational skills. It is a course with strong industry partners and links with titles like NME, Uncut, Vice and Kerrang! Our alumni are already creating an impact in the industry, with Music Journalism graduates working in MTV, Absolute Radio, Rock Sound, Time Out, The Quietus, Clash magazine, Vice, NME, Rarely Unable PR, Polydor Records, Sony, Muzu.tv, Reveal, Spindle, Dummy and Line of Best Fit.

    Music has the capacity to inspire social comment. This course recognises that music is a barometer of creative and cultural forces in society. Our approach is practical and academic, and our outcomes for the student are intuitive, challenging and informative.

  • LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT7

    Learning and Teaching Strategy

    In keeping with all courses at the University for the Creative Arts, the BA (Hons) Music Journalism team believe that the most effective educational experience combines both structured teaching and independent study. The teaching methods encourage deeper thinking, while the learning strategies promote critical reflection and the capacity to sustain a commitment to study.

    Learning and teaching strategies combine structured teaching, one-to-one support and independent study to empower students as autonomous thinkers. The team deliver essential skills and support and, as the course progresses, allow the individual student to develop responsibility for their own learning. Timetabled self directed study will enable students to demonstrate their skills as independent learners through personal time management, as well as developing their ability to formulate goals and meet deadlines. We also use self directed study to get experience of real life professional working conditions.

    Our study of Music Journalism is aligned to current pedagogic thinking and in particular deep approaches to learning. The teaching methods promote creativity and exploration, as well as the skills of critical reflection and sustained study. These methods include: group work, group and individual tutorials, seminars, critiques, presentations, work placements and self-directed study.

    The course team believe in the integration of theory and reflective practice as a critical learning curve.. Theoretical components are integrated within the course, allowing students to contextualise their practice in preparation for employment and/or postgraduate study.

    The course benefits from its proximity to London and the considerable live resource that London provides. Regular guest practitioners and industry partners (such as John Doran at the Quietus and Phil Alexander, editor-in-chief of MOJO, Kerrang and Q) deliver lectures or teach on specific projects bringing with them current approaches and a critical, external perspective. We also do field trips to music press offices like NME, Kerrang! and MOJO. All projects are updated annually to embrace current trends, industry developments, new ideas and methods of delivery.

    Assessment Strategy

    Tutorials: The output from Music Journalism projects will be of a highly individual nature, and therefore tutorials are an effective way of developing academic strengths and journalistic practice. They will:

    7 Include reference to the following, where appropriate: PDP, online learning, independent learning, exchange, placement, employability & employer engagement

  • Take place when work is well progressed

    Have a trouble-shooting function

    Permit tutor and student to explore ways in which the project might be improved or polished through identifying strengths and weaknesses

    Support students in achieving learning outcomes

    Group Tutorials are also employed across the course to:

    Enable students to learn from one another

    Engage students in tutor supervised constructive feedback of each others work

    Critically evaluate the effectiveness of tasks and set goals for the future

    Peer critique and peer assessment are used alongside student presentations to enable staff to:

    Monitor students understanding of learning outcomes and assessment requirements

    Hone their presentation and critical judgment skills

    Seminars are used:

    To introduce and explain the learning outcomes and objectives as detailed in unit handbooks and briefings

    To contextualise set projects in terms of the theoretical, professional and cultural issues that inform the subject

    As an inspirational tool to engage students in a constructive approach to study

    Technical Demonstrations:

    Support the acquisition of technical skills in a range of IT packages relevant to publishing and broadcast media

    Introduce essential practical techniques such as photography, radio, video filming and editing

    Provide demonstrations and hands-on instruction

  • Allow students the practical experience needed for using these skills on their own.

    Work Placements are a significant feature of all BA (Hons) courses at Epsom, as they ensure that all students develop an understanding of the industrial workplace and build up a network of useful contacts. It is an area of special importance to Music Journalism, as much of the industry relies on a personal network to promote work opportunities. In addition the staff will use extensive industry contacts to attract guest speakers and ease the graduate students route into employment. The course actively encourages students to enter national journalism competitions (like the Guardian Student Media Awards) whenever possible, and our annual Stepping Out industry conference is a great opportunity for students to meet editors, musicians and those working for record labels or PR companies.

    It is the nature of all journalism that work is both self-directed and conducted within varying editorial parameters and in response to briefs from commissioning editors. The course replicates these conditions as closely as possible by establishing the framework for independent study from an early point in the course. Students will be encouraged to develop a structured approach to Independent Study, as well as appropriate research skills. Without imaginative research, students will not attain the level...

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