tri county press 040115

Download Tri county press 040115

Post on 21-Jul-2016

217 views

Category:

Documents

3 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

 

TRANSCRIPT

  • TRI-COUNTYTRI-COUNTYPRESS 75

    WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 2015 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

    Your Community Press newspaperserving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

    Vol. 31 No. 29 2015 The Community Press

    ALL RIGHTS RESERVEDNews ..........................248-8600Retail advertising ..............768-8404Classified advertising .........242-4000Delivery ........................576-8240

    See page A2 for additional information

    Contact The PressFAST STARTS B1Track and field teamslook for quick break fromblocks

    BLEU FOODChicken favorite can bemade at home A5

    Funds have been promised,work has been arranged, andthough Princeton City Schoolshas not yet OKd the preservationof historic murals, advocates forthe project remain optimistic.

    While only a fraction of themoney has been gathered, orga-nizer Kelli Reisen said an anony-mous donor has promised to cov-er the remaining cost of the moveand preservation of seven mosa-ics from the old high school to thenew campus across the street.

    Princetons Board of Educa-tion had told advocates workingto save the murals that they hadto raise the funds and arrange forthe removal, but that the boarddidnt oppose the project.

    Reisen, a 1982 graduate ofPrinceton High School, and New-

    port Development Services Di-rector Greg Tulley, also a 1982grad, addressed the PrincetonBoard of Education at a specialmeeting March 19.

    The cost of removing and pre-serving the panels had been re-duced from an original estimate

    of $225,000 to $125,000, yet only$14,000 had been raised. Theanonymous donor would coverthe remaining costs. Reisen saidthe Evans Group, which is al-ready under contract withPrinceton, has agreed to take onthe project.

    There will be no financial li-ability for the school, Reisensaid.

    Still, the group working tosave the murals doesnt have agreen light to proceed.

    School Board member SteveMoore said the details wouldhave to be discussed among rep-resentatives of Turner Construc-tion, Princeton administratorsand board members before theyagree to the removal and preser-vation of the murals.

    Moore cited schedule and costconcerns as the delay, althoughadvocates of the murals havemet the financial and logistic cri-teria that the board had set.

    After hearing Reisens andTulleys report, Moore said thishas a chance to work out, thoughhe repeated several times that hehad concerns about the preserva-tion.

    We have to understand theimplications, he said, address-ing the advocates. You think youhave the answers, but we haventmet with these people yet,Moore said, referring to Turnerand Evans.

    Tulley was not phased.Whatever we have to do to

    move forward, he said. Welldo.

    Kevin Richard, a senior pro-ject manager for Turner Con-struction, set a meeting forMarch 25.

    The panels, designed by Cin-cinnati painter and muralist CarlZimmerman in 1958, reflectShakespeare's "Seven Ages ofMan."

    Each of the seven panels de-picts one of the ages: infant,schoolboy, lover, soldier, justice,old age and incapacity.

    Funds promised, yet advocates await OK on muralsKelly McBridekmcbride@communitypress.com

    THANKS TO KELLI REISEN

    Princeton High Schools wall murals, representing Shakespeares SevenAges of Man, will be destroyed unless the school board allows advocatesto have them preserved and moved to the new campus, across ChesterRoad.

    The Photography Club of Greater Cin-cinnati presents its annual Travel Series atSharon Woods, showcasing local photogra-

    phers trips around theworld and throughout theUnited States.

    The work of seven localphotographers is featuredevery Friday through April24.

    Each artist was asked todescribe his collection andthe adventure that inspiredthe photographs.

    Jerry Fritsch of Kenwood will sharephotos from his excursions around townand to nearby cities.

    Where did you travel?I traveled to various locations around

    Cincinnati, including the Cincinnati Zooand Botanical Gardens, Ault Park, FrenchPark, Sharon Woods, Salt Fork State Park,East Fork State Park, Ewing and Medary-ville in Indiana, and Lucas/Ottawa countiesin Ohio.

    Why did you travel there?I traveled to those locations to get shots

    of nature images. Sometimes to specific lo-cations for specific species, such as Meda-ryville for Sandhill Cranes.

    What was the highlight of your trip?The highlight of each trip was captur-

    ing good nature images. In some cases, cap-turing images of endangered species.

    What would you like viewers to takeaway from your photo presentation?

    I would like viewers of my images totake home a greater appreciation for na-ture, and some of the complexities of cap-turing nature images.

    The programs at the Sharon Centre au-ditorium at Sharon Woods, 11450 LebanonRoad, begin at 7:30 p.m. They are free andopen to the public but require a HamiltonCounty Park District motor vehicle permit.The permits, $10 annual or $3 daily, can bepurchased at the park.

    THANKS TO JERRY FRITSCH

    A tiger cub and mother snuggle at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens.

    THANKS TO JERRY FRITSCH

    These tulips bloomed at the Cincinnati Zoo andBotanical Gardens.

    THANKS TO JERRY FRITSCH

    This purplish copper butterfly alights to a bladeof grass at Stonelick Lake State Park.

    Photoscapture vividview ofnatureKelly McBridekmcbride@communitypress.com

    Jerry Fritsch

    The Travel SeriesMarch 6: Al Klee Adventures In PatagoniaMarch 13: Cliff Goosmann Cruising Aus-

    tralasiaMarch 20: Cliff Turrell Germany, Alsace

    and Verdun (WWI)March 27: Alan Lloyd Along the St. Law-

    rence SeawayApril 3: Good Friday, no presentationApril 10: Mike Rank Rocky MountainsApril 17: Jerry Fritsch Nature TravelsApril 24 Neal Jefferies Statues & Sculp-

    ture around the World

    Wyoming City Council hascleared the way for a projectto clean up a portion of theWest Fork Mill Creek streambank.

    A $112,315 grant from theOhio EPA will help fund the$149,755 project, which in-cludes clearing invasive hon-eysuckle plants, planting in-digenous trees and shrubs,and protecting a small area ofthe creek bank against ero-sion.

    That area, about 250 feet, isnear the citys water plant anda bend in the creek.

    One of the things it does isprotects lime sludge settlingponds, Water Works Direc-tor Michael Lippert said of thewaste product from the soft-ening process at the nearbywater plant.

    Theres a dam betweenthe ponds and Mill Creek thatare showing signs of failure,and this will reinforce thatbank so it doesnt happen,Lippert said.

    One of the things it does isprotects lime sludge settlingponds, Water Works Direc-tor Michael Lippert said of thewaste product from the soft-ening process at the nearbywater plant.

    The lime sludge is recycledfor use on farms, he said.

    The project includes plac-ing rocks in the center of thecreek to divert the water andprotect against bank erosion.

    Wyoming City Councilpassed a resolution to award

    Wyomingclears wayfor streambankprojectBy Kelly McBridekmcbride@communitypress.com

    See STREAM, Page A2

  • A2 TRI-COUNTY PRESS APRIL 1, 2015 NEWS

    TRI-COUNTYPRESS

    NewsDick Maloney Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.comSheila Vilvens Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7139, svilvens@communitypress.comMelanie Laughman Sports Editor . . . . . . .768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Adam Baum Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-364-4497, abaum@communitypress.com

    Twitter: @adamjbaum

    AdvertisingTo place an ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-768-8404,

    EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

    DeliveryFor customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .576-8240 Stephen Barraco

    Circulation Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Lynn Hessler District Manager . . . . . . . . . . .248-7115, lyhessler@communitypress.com

    ClassifiedTo place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

    Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms

    To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

    Find news and information from your community on the WebCincinnati.com/communities

    Calendar ................A4Classifieds ................CFood .....................A5Police .................... B5Schools ..................A3Sports ....................B1Viewpoints .............A6

    Index

    the project to Water Qual-ity Systems Inc. in Cleves.Construction was sched-uled to begin in March,with completion beforesummer.

    Not only are we stabi-lizing the bank, were alsogoing to improve the habi-tat with the plantings,Lippert said. We will ulti-mately improve the WestFork stream.

    StreamContinued from Page A1

    THANKS TO MICHAEL LIPPERT

    A portion of the West Fork Mill Creek will be protectedagainst erosion in a project that will include the removal ofinvasive plants and the planting of native trees and shrubs.

    Evendale CulturalArts Center hostsBird Brain

    The Cincinnati Play-house in the Parks Offthe Hill family seriesproduction of VernThiessens Bird Brain.recommended for ages 5and up, will be per-formed at the EvendaleCultural Arts Centerat 3p.m. Sunday, April 19. Ad-mission is free, registerat 563-2247 to save yourseat.

    Bird Brain, basedon the story Vogelkoppby Albert Wendt, is acharming and funny fa-ble full of laughs and thelesson that strange be-havior isnt always fool-ish. It tells the tale of akindhearted woodcutterwho finds a nest of freez-ing baby birds and de-cides to give