to his coy mistress – andrew marvel [ 1650]

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To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel [ 1650]. Coy:  Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest.  To allure; to entice; to decoy. Playing hard to get. To His Coy Mistress – Andrew Marvel. Starter - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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To His Coy Mistress Andrew Marvel [1650]

Coy: Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest. To allure; to entice; to decoy. Playing hard to get.

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelStarterWrite about a time on holiday when you successfully or unsuccessfully tried to chat up a girl. Think about what worked in your conversation or why you might have failed.

(If you have not been in this position use your imagination or write about a friends experience.)

To His Coy Mistress Andrew Marvel Learning ObjectivesAs we study this poem you will learn about:The story of the poemThe term carpe diem.More about the terms,Metaphor: Tone: Imagery.You will also complete some mini tasks, a test and an assignment on the poem.

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelAssignment To His Coy Mistressis known as aCarpe diem poem where the man is trying to persuade the woman to his point of view. In Macbeth Act 1 Sc7 we have the opposite situation as Lady Macbeth tries to persuade her husband to kill the king and seize the throne. In your assignment discuss and compare the methods these two characters use to try to get their own way and seize the day. 600-800 words by Thursday 27 Feb.

Hwk: For Sunday 2nd Feb Who was Andrew Marvel and what was unusual about the publication of this poem?Had we but world enough, and time,This coyness, Lady, were no crimeWe would sit down and think which wayTo walk and pass our long love's day.Thou by the Indian Ganges' sideShouldst rubies find: I by the tideOf Humber would complain. I wouldLove you ten years before the Flood,And you should, if you please, refuseTill the conversion of the Jews.My vegetable love should growVaster than empires, and more slow;An hundred years should go to praiseThine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;Two hundred to adore each breast,But thirty thousand to the rest;An age at least to every part,And the last age should show your heart.For, Lady, you deserve this state,Nor would I love at lower rate.But at my back I always hearTime's wingd chariot hurrying near;And yonder all before us lieDeserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found,Nor, in thy marble vault, shall soundMy echoing song: then worms shall tryThat long preserved virginity,And your quaint honour turn to dust,And into ashes all my lust:The grave 's a fine and private place,But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hueSits on thy skin like morning dew,And while thy willing soul transpiresAt every pore with instant fires,Now let us sport us while we may,And now, like amorous birds of prey,Rather at once our time devourThan languish in his slow-chapt power.Let us roll all our strength and allOur sweetness up into one ball,And tear our pleasures with rough strifeThorough the iron gates of life:Thus, though we cannot make our sunStand still, yet we will make him run.

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelMini Task 1What is the three part structure of the Poem?5Had we but world enough, and time,This coyness, Lady, were no crimeWe would sit down and think which wayTo walk and pass our long love's day.Thou by the Indian Ganges' sideShouldst rubies find: I by the tideOf Humber would complain. I wouldLove you ten years before the Flood,And you should, if you please, refuseTill the conversion of the Jews.My vegetable love should growVaster than empires, and more slow;An hundred years should go to praiseThine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;Two hundred to adore each breast,But thirty thousand to the rest;An age at least to every part,And the last age should show your heart.For, Lady, you deserve this state,Nor would I love at lower rate.But at my back I always hearTime's wingd chariot hurrying near;And yonder all before us lieDeserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found,Nor, in thy marble vault, shall soundMy echoing song: then worms shall tryThat long preserved virginity,And your quaint honour turn to dust,And into ashes all my lust:The grave 's a fine and private place,But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hueSits on thy skin like morning dew,And while thy willing soul transpiresAt every pore with instant fires,Now let us sport us while we may,And now, like amorous birds of prey,Rather at once our time devourThan languish in his slow-chapt power.Let us roll all our strength and allOur sweetness up into one ball,And tear our pleasures with rough strifeThorough the iron gates of life:Thus, though we cannot make our sunStand still, yet we will make him run.

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelMini Task 1What is the tree part structure of the Poem?If (Had), But, Therefore.Mini Task 2What form does the poem take?Had we but world enough, and time,But at my back I always hear Now therefore, while the youthful hue

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelMini Task 2What form does the poem take?

The form of the poem is an argument.Argument:Inlogicandphilosophy, anargumentis an attempt to persuade someone of something, by giving reasons for accepting a particular conclusion as evident.

Mini Task 3Sum up the three main points in the argument the man makes.To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelMini Task 3Sum up the three main points in the argument the man makes.

If we had all the time in the world I would have time enough to make you fall in love with me.But we dont have all the time in the world, not even all the time in our lifetime.So let me seduce you now!To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelThe Story of the Poem This is the best recognizedcarpe diem(seize the day) poem in English Literature. In the poem, the speaker addresses a woman who has been slow to respond to his sexual advances. In the first stanza he describes how he would love her if he were to be unencumbered by the constraints of a normal lifespan. He could spend centuries admiring each part of her body and her resistance to his advances , that is her coyness, would not discourage him. In the second stanza, he laments how short human life is. Once life is over, the speaker contends, the opportunity to enjoy one another is gone, as no one embraces in death. In the last stanza, the speaker urges the woman to accept his advances, and argues that in loving one another with passion they will both make the most of the brief time they have to liveMini Task 4 :- Summarise the story of the poem.To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelThe Structure of the PoemMini Task 5 :- How is the poem structured? To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelThe Structure of the PoemMini Task 5 :- How is the poem structured ? The poems structure is 3 uneven stanzas: of 20, 12 & 14 lines. Each line has 8 syllables. It is written in rhyming couplets, which is one of its Key Features. These structural features help to give the poem a strong rhythm.

Mini Task 6What are the poems other Key Features? To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelThe Structure of the Poem Key FeaturesMini Task 6What are the poems other Key Features? Alliteration Imagery Metaphor Simile

Mini Task 7On your copy of the poem, find and mark up as many examples of alliteration as you can.

Had we but world enough, and time,This coyness, Lady, were no crimeWe would sit down and think which wayTo walk and pass our long love's day.Thou by the Indian Ganges' sideShouldst rubies find: I by the tideOf Humber would complain. I wouldLove you ten years before the Flood,And you should, if you please, refuseTill the conversion of the Jews.My vegetable love should growVaster than empires, and more slow;An hundred years should go to praiseThine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;Two hundred to adore each breast,But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part,And the last age should show your heart For, Lady, you deserve this state,Nor would I love at lower rate.But at my back I always hearTime's wingd chariot hurrying near;And yonder all before us lieDeserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found,Nor, in thy marble vault, shall soundMy echoing song: then worms shall tryThat long preserved virginity,And your quaint honour turn to dust,And into ashes all my lust:The grave 's a fine and private place,But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hueSits on thy skin like morning dew,And while thy willing soul transpiresAt every pore with instant fires,Now let us sport us while we may,And now, like amorous birds of prey,Rather at once our time devourThan languish in his slow-chapt power.Let us roll all our strength and allOur sweetness up into one ball,And tear our pleasures with rough strifeThorough the iron gates of life:Thus, though we cannot make our sunStand still, yet we will make him run.

Mini Task 7 : Key Features - Alliteration.13To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelKey Features Imagery

Mini Task 8 - Imagery.From each stanza select one image you find interestingExplain why you have selected that image.

To His Coy Mistress Andrew MarvelKey Features ImageryMini Task 8From each stanza select one image you find interestingExplain why you have selected that image.

Principal Imagery Stanza 1Had we but world enough, and time,This coyness, Lady, were no crimeWe would sit down and think which wayTo walk and pass our long love's day.Thou by the Indian Ganges' sideShouldst rubies find: I by the tideOf Humber would complain. I wouldLove you ten years before the Flood,And you should, if you please, refuseTill the conversion of the Jews.My vegetable love should growVaster than empires, and more slow;An hundred years should go to praiseThine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;Two hundred to adore each breast,But thirty thousand to the rest;An age at least to every part,And the last age should show your heart.For, Lady, you deserve this state,Nor would I love at lower rate. Ganges: Great river of the pl