time to rhyme

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Teaching Rhyming words

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  • Letter Tiles

    Letter Tiles are a versatile, hands-on word building

    manipulative, ideal for introducing phonics concepts and

    giving children practice building every word imaginable.

    Like other manipulatives, Letter Tiles help children visualize

    concepts concretely and remember what they learn. In

    addition to regular alphabet letter tiles, teachers can now

    purchase multi-letter cluster tiles: important chunks of letters

    (ch, ing, qu, etc.) that children need to recognize as a unit

    when they read or spell.

    Alphabet Letter Tiles, uppercase and lowercase letters on

    1 1/4" x 1" plastic tiles.

    Cluster Tiles, blends, digraphs, vowel pairs, rimes, and word

    endings on 1 1/4" x 1 1/4" and 1 1/4" x 2" plastic tiles.

    Onset and Rime Tiles, plastic tiles with common word

    beginnings (onsets) and endings (rimes) that children can

    use to build words.

    Letter Tile Resource Books

    Learning with Letter Tiles A Guide to Hands-On Phonics

    Appealing activities and games that get children actively

    involved in exploring letters and how they go together to

    make words.

    Rime Time Building Word Families with Letter Tiles

    70 powerful word families are created with these

    charmingly illustrated activity pages and a set of 42

    letter tiles.

    Time to Rhyme Building Words with Rimes That Rhyme

    An exploration of words that have the same ending sounds

    but are spelled in two or more different ways.

    For these and other language arts resources for teachers,

    consult the Primary Concepts catalog.

    Primary ConceptsP.O. Box 10043

    Berkeley, CA 94709

    Cat. No. 7005

    Primary Concepts

  • Design and production: Hyru Gau Editor: Sarah Le Forge

    2000 Primary ConceptsP.O. Box 10043

    Berkeley, CA 94709www.primaryconcepts.com

    Catalog no. 7005

    All rights reserved.

    Primary Concepts grants teachers permission to photocopy the reproducible pages from this eBook

    for classroom use only. Permission is limited to the teacher for whom the eBook was purchased. No other use of

    this product is allowed without prior written consent of the publisher.

    ISBN 978-1-60184-175-9

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Teaching Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

    Rhyme Family Activities

    Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

    Letter Tiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

    Rime Page

    _ail / _ale 7

    _aid / _ade 9

    _ace / _ase 11

    _ain / ane 13

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    _e / _ea / _ee 15

    _eed / ead 17

    _eek / eak 19

    _eal / eel 21

    _eep / _eap 25

    _ear / _eer / _ere 27

    _eet / eat 29

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    _ight / _ite 31

    _ide / _ied 33

    _ie / _y / _igh 35

    Rime Page

    _oad / _ode 37

    _ow / _o 39

    _ole / _oal / _oll 41

    _one / _own / _oan 43

    _oat / ote 45

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    _ed / _ead 47

    _um / _ome / _umb 49

    _un / _on 51

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    _ake / _eak 53

    _ore/ _oar / _our 55

    _air / _are / _ear 57

    _ue / _oo / _ew 59

    _oot / _uit / _ute 61

  • 4 Time to Rhyme Primary Concepts

    TEACHING NOTES

    With Time to Rhyme: Building Words with Rimes That Rhyme, students explore families of words that have the same ending sounds but are spelled in two or more different ways. Stu-dents are involved actively in

    building words with letter tiles, sorting the words by spelling pattern, learning about the meanings of words including homophones, and using words that rhyme to create silly sentences

    Students build words by pairing onset tiles with rimes and blending the sounds together. Onsetsare single consonants, blends, or digraphs that begin words or syllables. Rimes are the voweland whatever follows it in a word or syllable. In the word snail, for example, sn is an onset and ailis a rime. Working with onsets and rimes helps children think of parts of words as units.

    In Time to Rhyme, the focus is on rimes that rhyme; that is, rimes like ail and ale that soundthe same but are spelled differently. The goal is for children to learn spelling patterns for commonrimes that rhyme and be able to use those words in sentences.

    GETTING STARTEDTo get started on the Time to Rhyme activities, you will need 42 letter tiles: all the single consonants except q and x, 4 digraphs (ch, sh, th, and wh), 17 blends (bl, br, st, and so on), plus kn and qu. Plastic letter tiles are available for purchase from the publisher. Tiles can also be made by reproducing page 64 and cutting out the letters on the dotted lines. Each child willneed a set of letter tiles to do the activities.

    The activities can be done in any sequence. The sequence in the book starts with long vowel patterns (a, then e, then l, then o) and ends with more difficult or irregular spelling patterns.

    USING THE PAGESDemonstrate how to complete a rhyme family investigation, using pages 7 and 8 as an example.

    Word Building

    Draw the students attention to the picture at the top of page 7 and notice with them that the words tail and whale have the same ending sounds, but are spelled in two different ways: ail and ale. One has the vowel pair ai and one has the silent e pattern. Have the children find the two word endings, called rimes, below the picture.

    Tell the children that they will be creating lots of rhymingwords using these two rime endings. Have the childrenfind the letters shown in the box in their collection of letter tiles. These beginning letters are called onsets.Onsets combine with rimes to form words. Have the children place each tile, one by one, on the spaces

  • Time to Rhyme Primary Concepts 5

    beside each rime ending and blend the sounds together to form a word. Say the word aloudwith the students and use it in a sentence or two so everyone understands its meaning.

    Deciding Which Spelling is Correct

    To determine which spelling is correct, have the children try the onset tile with each of the endings and think about whichlooks right. If the children have seen the word correctly spelled a number of times, they will most likely think the correct spellinglooks better than the alternative. For example, they are likely to decide that whale looks better than whail. This strategy is a good one for children to learn and use in all of the writing assignments. They may be surprised at how many times they can guess correctly at the spelling of a word merely by trying it several ways and then choosing the one thatlooks the most right.

    Sorting by Spelling Pattern

    After students have decided on the correct spelling, have them write the word in the column below its spelling pattern so that the words that are spelled alike are together. Sorting the words by spelling pattern helps cement the different ways the rime ending is commonly spelled. As the columns fill with words, notice with the students which rimeending has more words and is probably the more common spelling pattern.

    Homophones

    Sometimes more than one rime makes a word. These are called homophones. Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled differently. In the ail / alerhyme family, the words tail and tale, sail and sale, pail and pale, mail and male are all homophones. As you build each of these special words, make sure to discuss their meanings.

    Rhyme Family Words

    Continue until you have tried each of the letter tiles (all should make at least one word). Then hand ou page 8 or display it on the overhead and explain to the children that they can check their word list against the word list on page 8 to make sure they have all the words and that they are all spelled correctly. They can also check the homophone section to find out the meanings of words that are homophones.

    Making Silly Sentences

    Finally, have the class as a group come up with a sentence or two that uses lots of the rhyme family words. These can be silly sentences, but any rhyme family words should

    be spelled correctly. Students can use the rhyme family list and the homophone sentences to make sure their words are spelled

    correctly, Here is an example for the ail / ale family:

  • 6 Time to Rhyme Primary Concepts

    After you have walked the children through a rhyme family exploration, they should be able towork on their own on the remaining pages. You might want to hand out the odd-numberedpages first and have the children complete the word building to the best of their abilities, thenhand out the even page for them to check their work and do the writing task.

    HOMEWORKTime to Rhyme pages are a convenient at-home activity. After introducing theactivities in the classroom, you may wish to set up a routine of sending a rhymefamily exploration home with students to do as homework each week. A supplyof onset tiles could be kept in a bag or envelope to be used for the activities.

    EXTENDING THE ACTIVITIESHere are a few ways to extend the activities in the book.

    Word Hunt

    Once the students have completed a page, they could go on a Word Hunt to findmore words for each spelling pattern. Names of people or places could be added.For example, the word Spain could be added to the ain

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