the zine, july 17, 2012

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The July 17, 2012 issue of the Zine, southeast New Mexico's premiere source for entertainment news and events.

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    July 17, 2012

    Serving Lea, Eddy, Chaves, Otero andLincoln CountiesPhoto courtesy of Ty Wyant

    TheHubbard

    FoundationScholarships

    A little goes a long wayPictured (left to right) is Joan Dale

    Hubbard; Cary Gumbert; sons, Zachary, six; Andrew, 10; his wife Cynthia and R.D. Hubbard during Gumberts recent visit to

    Ruidoso. Gumbert is the fi rst recipient of a Hubbard Foundation academic scholarship.

    575.257.4SPA (4772)Toll free 1.855.257.4SPA

    1900 Sudderth at River Crossing Ruidoso, NMfusionmedicalspa.net

    S e e o u r a d , p g . 6

    For a younger and newer you!

    see story pg. 3

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  • 2 The Zine Living & EntErtainmEnt guidE July 17, 2012

    MESCALEROAPACHE TRIBE

    HWY 380THE PONY EXPRESS TRAIL

    CARRIZOZO CAPITAN LINCOLN HONDO VALLEY

    LEAPERMIAN BASIN

    HOBBS LOVINGTON

    EDDYPECOS VALLEYCARLSBAD ARTESIA

    CHAVESPECOS VALLEY

    ROSWELL

    LINCOLNSACRAMENTO MOUNTAINSRUIDOSO RUIDOSO DOWNS HWY 380

    OTEROWHITE SANDS / TULAROSA BASIN

    ALAMOGORDO CLOUDCROFT TULAROSA

    Guadalupe Mountains National Park lifts restrictions on smokingGuadalupe Mountains National Park Superin-

    tendent Dennis A. Vsquez announced that, ef-fective immediately, the park is lifting restrictions on smoking that have been in place since June 25. However, open flames, fireworks, campfires or char-coal or wood barbecues are never allowed within the park.

    Vsquez stated recent monsoon rains have set up a typical pattern of afternoon storms, which have reduced fire danger levels from high to moderate, so we are comfortable lifting the restrictions on smoking at this time. However, we will continue to monitor conditions and will re-evaluate this decision if conditions change and increase the danger of fire. We remain, as always, concerneded for the safety of park visitors and staff, as well as park resources and structures, and are remaining vigilant. Visitors should continue to be fire safe and not have a false

    sense of security about the possibility of fire igni-tions due to the recent rainfall, and should continue to be careful with ignition sources. Under moderate fire danger levels, fire can still ignite and spread rapidly from natural causes, such as lighting, as well as from accidental causes, such as an unextin-guished cigarette. Vsquez emphasized, We hope that visitors will continue to recreate and enjoy the park safely.

    Guadalupe Mountains National Park offers a great variety of recreational opportunities, including camping, hiking, backpacking, wildlife watching and birding, picnicking, horseback riding, nature photography or painting, ranger-led interpretive programs and Junior Ranger programs. Horseback riders must bring their own stock, however, as there are no rentals available in the park.

    Park information, including current conditions,

    restrictions or closures, may be found on the parks website (www.nps.gov/gumo/) and Facebook page (www.facebook.com/Guadalupe.Mountains) or by contacting the Pine Springs Visitor Center at 1-915-828-3251 x2124. The Pine Springs Visitor Center is open daily (except Christmas) from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. (8 a.m. until 6 p.m. through Labor Day).

    Motorists traveling past the park along Texas Highway 62/180 may tune in to the parks Traveller Information System radio broadcast at 1560 AM for up-to-date park information.

    For fire safety tips or more information on fire restrictions across Texas, visit http://txforestservice.tamu.edu/. For information on fire restrictions across new mexico, visit www.nmfireinfo.com, or call the Interagency Restrictuion and Closure Hotline at 1-877-864-6985.

  • July 17, 2012 The Zine Living & EntErtainmEnt guidE 3

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    Lincoln County Households

    Additional coverageLea, Eddy, Chaves, Otero

    Regional Radio Broadcast

    Ruidoso Downs Race Track

    Exclusive Sports Affiliate

    The Hubbard Scholarship Foundation A little bit goes a long way

    Eugene HeathmanThe very fi rst recipient of a Hubbard

    Foundation Scholarship, Cary Gumbert recently visited with R.D. and Joan Dale Hubbard to express his appreciation 22 years after receiving the very fi rst Hub-bard Academic Scholarship. Gumbert, a 1990 graduate from Ruidoso High School, received a $2,000 scholarship and went on to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

    Gumbert worked at the track the summer before going to MIT. The summer after my freshman year I was testing and designing the most advanced satellite systems in the world at Hughes. So you could say Ruidoso Downs Race Track and MIT were two key stepping stones to my dream job, Gumbert said.

    Performing well in his undergradu-ate studies Gumbert was lucky enough to be accepted into the graduate Aero/Astro program at MIT with a full fel-lowship from Hughes. Gumberts thesis was focused on evaluating the fi nancial and technical viability of mobile satel-lite systems like Iridium that were just starting to be proposed. Gumberts thesis advisors were the Department Head of aero/astro who later became the Chief Scientist of the Air Force, one of the founders of Orbital Science Corporation who was taking a year off to teach, and a professor who worked on the Apollo missions.

    MIT based fi nancial aid on historical income (not future) which made the tran-

    sition and timing very challenging for Gumbert. Tuition at the time was $20K per year and he didnt qualify for much aid outside of his scholarships and loans.

    The generosity of the Hubbards along with several other organizations in the community really helped. I prob-ably wouldnt have been able to stay at MIT without it. The Hubbard scholar-ship was the only four-year scholarship I had and it helped keep that fi rst door open for me, Gumbert said.

    President of the Hubbard Founda-tion, R.D. Hubbard said, We are very pleased to recognize and assist these top graduates of Lincoln County in attaining their college educations and reaching for their dreams. Hubbard noted that the scholarships are a way of actually procuring immediate results and in the smaller increments assist each student directly rather than being absorbed in administrative operations of large non-profi t corporations. It is always my hope that the scholarship recipients will become a productive member of their community and they too will fi nd a way to give back, Hubbard said.

    Now Im an executive at Avaya responsible for the strategy and program management of their service business with about $2 billion in revenue. My wife Cynthia and I try to give back and follow the example the Hubbards set for me. We support an organiza-tion called Breakthrough Austin (www.breakthroughaustin.org) which mentors

    and supports about 500 low-income students as they progress from 6th to 12th grade with the objective to help them become the fi rst generation in their family to attend and complete college,

    Gumbert and his wife Cynthia have talked about doing something for Ruidoso at some point. Perhaps estab-lishing a scholarship for students that are accepted and attend MIT or Harvard as a carrot to apply or somehow men-tor ones who are interested in going. The Ruidoso schools and community are so unique and did so much for me but looking back there were not enough mentors or encouragement to try to apply. I was lucky because I had a 10th grade teacher in Alamogordo who went to MIT who convinced me to apply. I would like to help change that and see a few accepted every year from Ruidoso, Gumbert said.

    Since 1990, when the Hubbard Foundation established the scholarship awards program in Lincoln County, more than $1.4 million has been award-ed in scholarships. In 2011, $115,780 was awarded to students in various areas in the U.S from The R.D. & Joan Dale Hubbard Foundation. Scholarships are awarded each year based on aca-demics, student potential, community service and other criteria.

    Each of these scholarships will generate $16,000 during a four-year period toward the Scholarship Award recipients education expense. Gradu-ates of all fi ve county high schools are eligible to apply each year. Eligibility requirements call for individuals to have maintained a minimum fi rst seven-se-mester high school GPA of 3.5 or better. This year, 31 students applied for the three scholarship awards.

  • 4 The Zine Living & EntErtainmEnt guidE July 17, 2012

    A property of

    The Zine is published every Tuesday by the Ruidoso Free Press, 1086 Mechem, Ruidoso, New Mexico 88345. The circulation of The Zine exceeds 12,000 printed copies weekly delivered via

    direct mail to homes and post office boxes located exclusively within Lincoln County.Over 3,000 papers are available at newsstands, stores and hotels throughout Lincoln, Lea,

    Eddy, Chaves, and Otero Counties. First class subscriptions to the Ruidoso Free Pressare available for $80 by calling 575-258-9922. Classifieds, legals, obituaries, wedding an-

    nouncements, birth announcements and thank-you ads are available by calling the classified department at 575-258-9922. For all advertising opportunities, call 575-258-9922.

    For submission of all editorial copy, press releases or letters to the editor, please email eugene@ruidosofreepress.com, or call 575-258-9922.

    Member New Mexico Press A