the suzanne farrell ballet | a collection of balanchine ballets

Download The Suzanne Farrell Ballet | A Collection of Balanchine Ballets

Post on 08-Apr-2016

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

In celebration of its 10th anniversary, The Suzanne Farrell Ballet presents an all-Balanchine program that includes Serenade, Concerto Barocco, and Diamonds. All three are abstract ballets with no definitive story or narrative, but they are chock full of dramatic and mysterious content.

TRANSCRIPT

  • Story in your HeadWhen watching ballet, it is natural to imagine a story behind the relationships we see on stage. These are people dancing, after all! Even though these Balanchine ballets are story-less, you might have imagined your own narratives. Pick one of the ballets, and write down a story you created to go with it. Share the story with your class.

    about Suzanne FarrellSuzanne Farrell is regarded as one of the greatest ballerinas of the 20th century. She has danced in more than 100 ballets, nearly one-third of which were created expressly for her by choreographer George Balanchine (pronounced BAH-lahn-sheen), known as the father of American ballet. Farrell utilizes her memories of and personal experience with Balanchines choreography when working with her own dancers.

    The costumes for Diamonds are a brilliant white with

    shimmering rhinestones and pearls. Imagine the

    costumes for the other two sections of the full ballet

    titled Emeralds and Rubies.

    Natalia Magnicaballi and Momchil Mladenov in Diamonds Photo by Carol Pratt

    David M. Rubenstein Chairman

    Michael M. Kaiser President

    Darrell M. Ayers

    Vice President, Education

    The Suzanne Farrell Ballet is generously sponsored by The Shen Family Foundation and Emily Williams Kelly.

    Additional support is provided by Monica Lind Greenberg, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and Elizabeth and Michael Kojaian.

    Performances for Young Audiencesis made possible by the Presidents Advisory Committee on the Arts, Capital One Bank, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Clark Charitable Foundation, Fight for Children, Inc., Mr. James V. Kimsey, The Kirstein Family Foundation, Inc., The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Linda and Tobia Mercuro, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Park Foundation, Inc., Mrs. Irene Pollin, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk, The Theodore H. Barth Foundation, Inc., the U.S. Department of Education, and the Verizon Foundation.

    Major support for the Kennedy Centers educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

    www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org

    Cuesheets are produced by ArtsEdgE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ArtsEdgE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning.

    Learn more about Education at The Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

    The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

    2011 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

    The

    Suzanne Farrell ballet

    ten yearS!Suzanne Farrell has chosen to celebrate the 10th anniversary of her company by presenting two all-Balanchine programs during the Companys annual Kennedy Center engagement. Today, you will see three ballets by George Balanchine: Serenade, Concerto Barocco, and Diamonds in this working rehearsal. All three are abstract ballets with no definitive story or narrative, but they are chock full of dramatic and mysterious content.

    Working rehearsal

    A Collection of Balanchine Ballets

    Natalia Magnicaballi and Momchil Mladenov in DiamondsPhoto by Carol Pratt

    Cuesheet P

    erfo

    rm

    an

    Ce G

    uid

    e

  • SerenadeChoreographed in 1934 Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (pronounced chy-KOFF-skee)

    Serenade was the first ballet created by Balanchine after he moved to this country from his native Russia. Balanchine created the ballet so his students could practice performing on stage. The ballet has four parts:

    n The Sonatina. At one rehearsal, a dancer showed up late, so Balanchine kept that moment in the choreography. Watch for the woman who enters toward the end of the first section to join the group. (A sonatina is a short sonata or musical piece composed for one or two instruments.)

    n The Waltz. In time, male dancers joined Balanchines class, so he worked them into the choreography. Watch for the moment when the male dancer lifts his partner high above his head. (A waltz is a dance with three beats per measure as in 1-2-3, 1-2-3.)

    n The Russian Dance. This section is full of energetic footwork. One night during rehearsal a woman fell, so Balanchine included this moment in the dance. Watch when the dancer suddenly finds herself alone on the floor.

    n Elegy. In this movement, a female dancer brings a male dancer forward to the woman lying on the floor. Listen for the sad, mournful music.

    The first movement of Serenade features only women, because when this work was

    created Balanchine had only women and no men in his class. Eventually this work was

    expanded to include six men.

    The Suzanne Farrell Ballet in SerenadePhoto by Paul Kolnik

    ConCerto BaroCCoChoreographed in 1940 Music by Johann Sebastian Bach

    Balanchine said that Concerto Barocco has no subject matter beyond the score to which it is danced and the particular dancers who execute it. Like many of Balanchines ballets, including Serenade and Diamonds, there is no concrete story or plot.

    Concerto Barocco is an interpretation of the musical score and has the same structure. The choreography has three movements just like the music, but Balanchine did not want to copy the score exactly. This is the first time The Suzanne Farrell Ballet performs Concerto Barocco.

    Watch:

    n how the two dancers in the first movement enter as the two solo violins take up their parts in the music. Notice how movement phrases reappear as the violinists repeat and develop their musical themes.

    n at the end of the second movement, how the male dancer swings his female partner low across the floor three times. She rises from the sweeping movement, showing the underlying strength of the lyrical music.

    n how the complexity and rhythmic energy of the music in the third movement is expressed through jumps and quick arm gestures by the dancers.

    diamondS Choreographed in 1967 Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

    Diamonds is part of a full-length ballet called Jewels. Balanchine created Diamonds specifically for Ms. Farrell. As part of the Companys Artistic Partnership program, dancers from The Sarasota Ballet, Iain Webb, Artistic Director, will join The Suzanne Farrell Ballet for the performance of this work.

    Balanchine created the ballet after being inspired by the work of jeweler Claude Arpels. The costumes for the dancers sparkle and shine, just like the gems.

    n You will be given headsets to listen to the commentary about the ballets as you watch the rehearsal. Share something you learned from the commentator with your class.

    No Story Needed: Three Balanchine Ballets

  • SerenadeChoreographed in 1934 Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (pronounced chy-KOFF-skee)

    Serenade was the first ballet created by Balanchine after he moved to this country from his native Russia. Balanchine created the ballet so his students could practice performing on stage. The ballet has four parts:

    n The Sonatina. At one rehearsal, a dancer showed up late, so Balanchine kept that moment in the choreography. Watch for the woman who enters toward the end of the first section to join the group. (A sonatina is a short sonata or musical piece composed for one or two instruments.)

    n The Waltz. In time, male dancers joined Balanchines class, so he worked them into the choreography. Watch for the moment when the male dancer lifts his partner high above his head. (A waltz is a dance with three beats per measure as in 1-2-3, 1-2-3.)

    n The Russian Dance. This section is full of energetic footwork. One night during rehearsal a woman fell, so Balanchine included this moment in the dance. Watch when the dancer suddenly finds herself alone on the floor.

    n Elegy. In this movement, a female dancer brings a male dancer forward to the woman lying on the floor. Listen for the sad, mournful music.

    The first movement of Serenade features only women, because when this work was

    created Balanchine had only women and no men in his class. Eventually this work was

    expanded to include six men.

    The Suzanne Farrell Ballet in SerenadePhoto by Paul Kolnik

    ConCerto BaroCCoChoreographed in 1940 Music by Johann Sebastian Bach

    Balanchine said that Concerto Barocco has no subject matter beyond the score to which it is danced and the particular dancers who execute it. Like many of Balanchines ballets, including Serenade and Diamonds, there is no concrete story or plot.

    Concerto Barocco is an interpretation of the musical score and has the same structure. The choreography has three movements just like the music, but Balanchine did not want to copy the score exactly. This is the first time The Suzanne Farrell Ballet performs Concerto Barocco.

    Watch:

    n how the two dancers in the first movement enter as the two solo violins take up their parts in the music. Notice how movement phrases reappear as the violinists repeat and develop their musical themes.

    n at the end of the second movement, how the male dancer swings his female partner low across the floor three times. She rises from the sweeping movement, showing the underlying strength of the lyrical music.

    n how the complexity and rhythmic energy of the music in the third movement is expressed through jumps and quick arm gestures by the dancers.

    diamondS Choreographed in 1967 Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

    Diamonds is part of a full-length ballet called Jewels. Balanchine created Diamonds specifically for Ms. Farrell. As part of the Comp