The production and consumption of music

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  • This article was downloaded by: [Florida International University]On: 03 September 2014, At: 07:29Publisher: RoutledgeInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registeredoffice: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

    Consumption Markets & CulturePublication details, including instructions for authors andsubscription information:http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gcmc20

    The production and consumption ofmusicAlan Bradshaw a & Avi Shankar ba School of Management, Royal Holloway , University of London ,UKb Department of Marketing , University of Bath , UKPublished online: 17 Nov 2008.

    To cite this article: Alan Bradshaw & Avi Shankar (2008) The production and consumption of music,Consumption Markets & Culture, 11:4, 225-227, DOI: 10.1080/10253860802391235

    To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10253860802391235

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  • Consumption Markets & CultureVol. 11, No. 4, December 2008, 225227

    ISSN 1025-3866 print/ISSN 1477-223X online 2008 Taylor & FrancisDOI: 10.1080/10253860802391235http://www.informaworld.com

    Guest editors introduction: The production and consumptionof music

    Alan Bradshawa* and Avi Shankarb

    aSchool of Management, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK; bDepartment of Marketing, University of Bath, UKTaylor and FrancisGCMC_A_339290.sgm10.1080/10253860802391235Consumption, Markets and Culture1025-3866 (print)/1477-223X (online)Original Article2008Taylor & Francis114000000December 2008AlanBradshawalan.bradshaw@rhul.ac.uk

    Music is the water of life, whiskey of passion, it uplifts us, releases us, marks our joy andsadness, it is to live for and to die for, it caries the spirit of truth and freedom, it demands to beshared beyond the bounds of race and tradition.

    (Michael O Suilleabhain)

    A principle agenda of Consumption, Markets and Culture relates to interrogating andcollapsing distinctions between production and consumption. As previous Editor-in-ChiefFuat Firat passionately argued, the consumptionproduction nexus is a defining aspect of amodernity that alienates us from creative living and reduces art into objects that acquirepermanence to allow economic exchange and speculation toward monetary amassment(1999, 289).

    In such a context, the condition of music emerges as a sort of magical domain that cancaptivate audiences, provide cathartic and embodied experiences, and ground identities andcommunities, but also introduce us to rich exchanges between peoples while somehow bothreifying and subverting power structures. Before the advent of recorded sound, music wasthe ultimate intangible experience rooted to time and place, simultaneously created anddestroyed, produced and consumed. Even after the advent of recording technologies,Jacques Attali notes how music simultaneously exhibits three dimensions of human works:joy for the creator, use-value for the consumer and exchange-value for the seller (1985,9); and as the musician may be creator, consumer and seller at once, music can be thoughtof as a social model in which consumption and production co-exist and are mutuallyconstitutive. Beyond this nexus, Attali theorizes the interferences and dependenciesbetween society and its music; music as ordering of noises is understood as a demonstrationof the very possibility of society and as harbinger of future orders and a negotiation ofpower.

    In agreement with Attali, the goal of this special issue is to locate music both within andbeyond such consumptionproduction nexuses. The Attalian challenge is no less thanmapping dependencies between societal power and its music and to understand the act ofmaking and listening to music as a production and consumption of social meaning. We aredelighted how the contributing authors have risen to the challenge and how the articlesfound in this special issue all locate music as a point through which ideology, state, crimeand community values all intersect with personal identities, subversion and relationships.An important aspect of this journal relates to its inter-disciplinarity; hence herein we find

    *Corresponding author. Email: alan.bradshaw@rhul.ac.uk

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  • 226 A. Bradshaw and A. Shankar

    ethnomusicology, film studies, sociology and consumer research studies. This is an issuethat, we are confident, provides excellent documentation of the wider theoretical andmethodological ramifications of music within consumption, markets and culture.

    The special issue begins with a conceptualization of how music allows us situate rela-tionships within Jamaica via Barbara Olsen and Stephen Goulds paper on lovemaps. Ratherthan freely floating texts, Jamaican dancehall is demonstrated as embedded within a richfabric of sexual and romantic relationships that reveal a tapestry of Jamaican life. Followingfrom this is the outcome of Anna Morcoms extensive travels through Tibet where shereminds us of the highly charged political nature of music and describes the problematicproduction of Tibetan music within a state-controlled market conscious of the subversivepotential of music. From there, we move to South Africa and to Michael Drewitts fascinat-ing description of the attempts to create a retro-market for anti-apartheid music created bywhite musicians during apartheid. Just as the original subversive recordings were initiallyignored by South African broadcasters, the attempts to re-launch the music are demon-strated to be almost as difficult because the role of white anti-apartheid movements jars withemerging dominant discourses of black resistance creating an unusual branding context.

    The links between music and criminality are next explored via Morris Holbrooksdescription of how jazz is semiotically deployed in film soundtracks to advance plots in thecrime film genre. Last, but certainly not least, David Hesmondhalgh draws upon empiricalresearch to argue against what he takes to be the optimistic trend of positing a generallypositive relationship between music, emotion and self-identity and calls for a more criticallyreflexive understanding.

    The six papers that we are publishing were selected from the 22 that we received andthat went into the review process. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their consci-entious and considerate responses. Our selection of papers are exciting reviews of importantconceptual issues relating to the production and consumption of music which, we hope, willcontribute to wider discussions of music more generally within our field.

    ReferencesAttali, Jacques. 1985. Noise: The political economy of music. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota

    Press.Firat, Fuat A. 1999. Rethinking consumption. Consumption, Markets and Culture 3, no. 4: 28395.

    Reviewers for the special issue

    Timothy Taylor, University of California, Los Angeles, USACraig Thompson, University of Wisconsin, USAScott Spencer, New York University, USAElizabeth Hirschman, Rutgers University, USAJonathan Schroeder, University of Exeter, UKAlf Rehn, bo Akademi University, FinlandDominique Bouchet, University of Southern Denmark, DenmarkJohn Sherry, Notre Dame University, USADaragh OReilly, University of Sheffield, UKMatthew MacDonald, Northeastern University, USARobin Canniford, University of Exeter, UKJames Fitchett, University of Leicester, UKLinda Scott, University of Oxford, UKByron Dueck, Open University, UKJanet Borgerson, University of Exeter, UK

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  • Consumption Markets & Culture 227

    Tim Newton, University of Exeter, UKSimon Frith, University of Edinburgh, UKzlem Sandikci, Bilkent University, TurkeyRobert V. Kozinets, York University, CanadaAnthony Patterson, University of Liverpool, UKEminegl Karababa, University of Exeter, UKMarkus Giesler, York University, CanadaEkant Veer, University of Bath, UKEric Arnould, University of Wyoming, USABrett Martin, University of Bath, UKMorris Holbrook, Colombia University, USARichard Elliott, University of Bath, UKAaron Ahuvia, University of Michigan Dearborn, USAChristina Goulding, University of Wolverhampton, UKBernard Cova, Euromed-Marseilles, FranceRussell Belk, York University, CanadaPauline Maclaran, Royal Holloway, University of London, UKDannie Kjeldgaard, University of Southern Denmark, DenmarkAlbert Muiz, DePaul University, USAKristine de Valck, HEC, Paris, FranceMichael Saren, University of Leicester, UK

    Extra acknowledgementsWe wish to acknowledge the support of Fuat Firat and Jonathan Schroeder. We also note theaccompanying special session that was presented at the 2007 European Association for ConsumerResearch conference in Milan and included contributions by Tali Yazicioglu, Linda Scott andRobin Canniford as well as the rocking sax jam of the great Dougie Brownlie.

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