the problem soil erosion - university of drtd0c/soil erosion.pdfآ  prediction of soil erosion by...

Download THE PROBLEM Soil Erosion - University of drtd0c/Soil Erosion.pdfآ  Prediction of Soil Erosion by Water

Post on 28-May-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1

    Soil Erosion

    hChapter 17 p. 740‐795

    1

    THE PROBLEM

    Land Degradation and Loss

    • Erosion • Salinization • Waterlogging• Waterlogging • Urbanization • Deforestation to replace 

    productivity lost

    • Over 15 million acres/year

    2

    3 3

    4 4

    On‐site Effects: Soil Productivity

    • Reduction in topsoil depth – Exposes less desirable (less productive) subsoil – Higher acidity & clay, lower fertility & SOM

    • Reduced rooting zone; soil surface is closer to:Reduced rooting zone; soil surface is closer to: – Bedrock – Restrictive horizons (e.g., fragipans)

    • Lower nutrient supply and available water  holding capacity

    • Loss of fines (silt & clay)

    5

    Off‐site Effects: Sediments

    • Yellow River ‐ China – 1.6 billion tons of sediment per year – China loses ≈ 18 tons/acre/year

    • Ganges River ‐ IndiaGanges River  India – 1.5 billion tons/year

    • Mississippi River ‐ USA – 300,000,000 tons/year – BEST SOILS IN THE US (and world)

    6

  • 2

    Effects of Sediments • Sediments are the #1 pollutant of surface  waters

    • Sediments carry – Nutrients ‐ N & P (eutrophication) – Pesticides – Other pollutants (organic chemicals & metals)

    • Sediments Destroy Aquatic Habitats – Cloudy water = lower photosynthesis = less O2 → hypoxia

    • Sediments degrade water supplies

    7

    Effects of Sediments Biological

    • Smothering of eggs and nests of fish • Transport of pollutants (toxins) • Clogging fish gills • Cover habitat of aquatic insects (fish food) • Reduce biological diversity (favors burrowing  animals)

    • Accelerates growth of aquatic plants and algae

    8

    Effects of Sediments Chemical

    • Interferes with photosynthesis • Decreases available oxygen due to organic  matter decomposition

    i l l h l• Increases nutrient levels that accelerate  eutrophication

    • Transports organic chemicals and metals into  the water column

    9

    Effects of Sediments Physical

    • Reduces or prevents light penetration • Changes temperature patterns • Decreases the depth of ponds and lakesDecreases the depth of ponds and lakes • Changes flow patterns

    10

    Magnitude of the Problem – USA 2003 Data

    • 368 million acres of cropland (19 % of total  area)

    / /• Average soil loss ≈ 2.63 tons/acre/year from  all cropland

    11

    Magnitude of the Problem – Tennessee  2003 Data

    • 4.75 million acres cultivated and non‐ cultivated cropland ≈ 17.6 % of total land area

    • Average cropland soil loss ≈ 3.6 ton/acre/year h 60 0 il i• There are 60,507 stream miles in Tennessee

    • 24,808 stream miles are impaired (41 %) • 5,212 stream miles are impaired by sediments  (21 % of impaired; 8.6 % of total)

    12

  • 3

    Magnitude of the Problem – Tennessee  2003 Data

    9.1

    13

    7.1

    5.6

    3.6

    Other Erosion Problem Areas • Poor forest management • Poor pasture and range management – Too many animal units/acre – Animal access to streams – Tramped & poorly vegetated forage areas

    • Urban construction – 100 to 200 ton/acre/year common

    • Surface Mining – 200+ ton/acre/year common

    14

    15 16

    What do tons/acre mean?

    • 1 acre, 6‐inches deep ≈ 2,000,000 lbs • Thus, 6 inches ≈ 1,000 tons of soil • 1 inch of soil over an acre = 167 tons • 16.7 tons/acre/year = 0.1 inch soil loss • At 2003 erosion rates, it would take 46 years  to lose 1 inch of soil evenly from the 4.75  million acres of cropland in Tennessee 

    [Tennessee was losing 1 inch of soil every 18 years in 1982]

    17

    One inch of soil may take 200 to 10,000 years to form

    Once eroded the loess derivedOnce eroded, the loess-derived soil in west Tennessee is lost forever

    18

  • 4

    19 19

    20 20

    21 21

    22 22

    The Erosion Process

    • Erosion: the movement of soil from desirable  to undesirable locations

    • A combination of three sequential processes D t h t– Detachment

    – Transport – Deposition

    23

    Geologic vs. Accelerated Erosion

    • Erosion is always occurring – geologic – Erosion ≈ soil formation

    • Disturbance of soil causes accelerated erosion A i l– Agriculture

    – Construction –Mining – Recreation

    24

  • 5

    Types of Erosion

    • Water Erosion – Removal of soil or rock by moving water

    • Wind Erosion – Removal of soil or rock by windRemoval of soil or rock by wind

    • Gravitational Erosion (often related to  hydrology) – Landslides –Mass wasting

    25

    Forms of Water Erosion 

    • Splash Erosion on bare soil – Impact of raindrop DETACHES silt and sand  particles preferentially

    – Tremendous transfer of energy to soilTremendous transfer of energy to soil – Destroys aggregates

    • Surface Runoff or Sheet Erosion – TRANSPORT of detached particles – Clays and silts travel furthest, sand very little

    26

    Forms of Water Erosion

    • Internal Erosion –Washing of soil particles into cracks and pores – Reduces infiltration – Known as CRUSTING or SURFACE SEALINGo as C US G o SU C S G

    • Channel Erosion – Rills – Gullies – Streambank erosion

    27

    Gully

    28 28

    Rills

    29

    Factors Affecting Water Erosion

    • Rainfall characteristics – Frequency, intensity, and duration of rainfall – As these increase, total energy available for  erosion increases

    • Soil Characteristics – Texture – Structure – Organic matter content – Permeability

    30

  • 6

    Factors Affecting Water Erosion

    • Slope characteristics – As length and % slope increase, amount and  velocity of runoff increases, and erosion increases

    • Vegetative coverg – Residues protect against SPLASH EROSION – Slows runoff velocity, so TRANSPORT decreases – Builds SOM and soil aggregation

    31

    Principles of Erosion Control

    1. Reduce raindrop  impact on soil surface

    2. Reduce runoff volume  d l iand velocity

    3. Increase soil’s  resistance to erosion 

    32

    How to stop Erosion

    • Erosion prevention is easier than stopping it  once it starts – Surface residues must be maintained Conservation tillage– Conservation tillage

    – Increase organic matter content – Produce enough biomass for erosion control

    33

    Soil Loss Tolerance ‐ T Value

    • T = maximum rate of annual soil loss that will  permit crop productivity to occur  economically and indefinitely.

    • Ranges from 1 to 5 ton/acre/year• Ranges from 1 to 5 ton/acre/year • 2 to 5 ton/acre/year for most soils • Soil loss tolerance “T” is assigned according to  properties of root limiting subsurface soil  layers. 

    34

    Soil Loss Tolerance ‐ T Value

    • Criteria for assigning “T” are estimated from: – The severity of physical or chemical properties of  subsurface layers. 

    – The climatically influenced properties of soilThe climatically influenced properties of soil  moisture and temperature. 

    – The economic feasibility of utilizing management  practices to overcome limiting layers or  conditions. 

    35

    Soil Loss Tolerance Factor ‐ T Value Depth to limiting  layer  (inches) Group 1 Group 2 Group 3

    0 ‐ 10  1 1* 3

    10 ‐ 20  1 2 3

    20 ‐ 40  2 3 4

    40 ‐ 60  3 4 4

    >60  5 5 5

    • Group 1 ‐‐ The limitations are significant or have permanent layers  of root limitation.

    • Group 2 ‐‐ The limitations are of moderate root restriction, or have  a less than permanent loss to productivity in a given climate.

    • Group 3 ‐‐ The limitations can be overcome in a given climate,  through natural or managed processes to achieve the productivity  level of the non‐eroded soil. 

    36

    * Some soils are assigned with soil loss tolerance of 2

  • 7

    Prediction of Soil Erosion by Water  RUSLE

    • Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation • Equation to predict loss (t/ac/yr) as function  of rainfall soil type landscape vegetationof rainfall, soil type, landscape, vegetation,  and conservation practices

    • A = R × K × LS × C × P

    37

    Definition of Factors RUSLE

    • A = Soil loss in tons/acre/year • R = Rainfall factor ‐ energy/acre/year term • K = Soil erodibility factor ‐ tons/energy • LS = Slope length and steepness factor • C = Crop/veget