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  • The Mobile ConsumerInsights on Global Trends Impacting Mobile Momentum and Customer Engagement

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Table of Contents

    4 Introduction

    5 Devices, Appetite and Use

    8 Maturity, Lifestyle and Work

    11 PreferencesandLevers

    14 MobileWalletOpportunities

    17 Conclusion

    20 Appendix

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Creating demand for mobile services relies on an understanding of mobile user behaviour. The following report provides marketers in the mobile industry with insights on the global trends impacting mobile momentum.

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    A global mobile user base is dynamic, complex and increasingly sophisticated in terms of needs and expectations relating to service delivery.

    Regional appetite for different mobile services and applications varies dramatically and the ways that users transact and communicate via mobile depends on the activities undertaken. Cultural, economic and technology norms shape regional uses of mobile, whilst an array of user requirements influence preferences towards appropriate marketing channels, relationships and incentives as they shop, spend and surf.

    In order to make informed marketing decisions and better understand mobile momentum and customer engagement across the globe,SAP commissioned independent researchamong mobile users across 4 key regions, encompassing 17 countries:

    North America (NAM) Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) Latin America (LATAM) Asia Pacific (APAC)

    Many countries within the regions have already reached a level of mobile maturity, yet for others mobile device use is evolving. This varied momentum contributes to differences in mobile ownership, appetite and behaviour.

    Growth in smartphone technology and the blur of social, mobile and traditional marketing channels have seen users becoming motivated by a range of complex factors. The greater the sophistica-tion of mobile use, the greater the sophistication of consumer needs. As the commercial elements of mobile interaction continue to take shape, CMOs capitalising on mobile channels need to balance the advancement of mobile functionality with these needs. Not all successful examples of mobility are based on bleeding edge innovation. The right service for the right user, marketed in the right way is a simplistic, yet appropriate, mantra for marketing strategy in the mobile sector.

    Introduction

    RESEARCHMETHODOLOGY12,424interviewswereconductedwithadultsaged18+whoownamobilephone(basicorsmartphone).RespondentscompletedanonlinesurveyinMarch/April2013.ResearchconductedbyLoudhouse,anindependentresearchagencybasedinLondon.

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Mobile devices have always given users the flexibility to communicate with each other on the go 79% either make or receive calls on their mobile phone daily, with 62% either sending or receiving texts on a daily basis.

    Yet the mobile phone in todays world has become an increasingly powerful Internet tool. Half (50%) of respondents globally access the mobile Internet on a daily basis. The way in which users now transact has subsequently evolved: while enjoying the benefit of greater flexibility, consumers are now more inclined to shop on their mobile device. Indeed, one in three (32%) has purchased products or services over the last 12 months via their mobile phone.

    The convenience of mobile communications and transactions has been a significant driver behind the increase in user adoption. Consumers cite the ability to use their device any time of the day (51%), ability to use on the go (51%), convenience

    (50%) and speed (50%) as the main benefits of communicating and transacting with service providers through a mobile phone.

    Nevertheless shopping behaviour also brings challenges for users. A significant minority (46%) note the hassle of having to enter a lot of personal information as a significant challenge when transacting and communicating via their mobile device. Additionally, 45% express safety concerns with mobile transactions, with 43% citing a lack of access to the Internet at the time of transaction.

    Globally, mobile purchasing shows huge potential, with the majority of users (82%) expressing an appetite for buying goods and services through their mobile devices in the future (Figure 1). Over half (53%) have not used their mobile to buy goods, but wish to do so in the future, whereas 29% have used their mobile to do so, and wish to continue. Only 1% has used their mobile to shop for goods and shows no desire to do so in the future.

    Devices, Appetite and Use

    82% of users express an appetite for buying goods and services through their mobile devices in the future.

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Mobile creates an opportunity for marketing strategy, but also carries a risk. Consumer enthusiasm for mobile freedom and flexibility must be respected. The desire to do more on mobile does not represent novelty, or a blind faith in mobile Internet services. It is a calculated response that comes with conditions to ensure end user engagement mobile must equate to simplicity, convenience or value.

    Furthermore, 80% of users agree that organisa-tions should use any available technology to make life easier for their customers. Such is the expectation of interconnectivity amongst todays consumers, that users are willing to hold service providers accountable if they fail to uphold high standards. Indeed, over half (54%) agree that they would switch to a different service provider if they could interact with them better on their mobile phone.

    Not used mobile to buy goods but want to 53%

    Net: Want to buy goods / more on mobile: 82%

    Figure1Appetite for purchasing via mobile

    Used mobile to buy goods and

    want to do it more 29%

    Used mobile to buy goods and content 1%

    Not used mobile to buy goods and

    content 17%

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Such is the reliance of mobile phones in emerging markets that 83% of users believe that having their mobile lost or stolen would really affect their personal productivity, compared to 70% in developing markets and 52% in mature markets.

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Just under two-thirds (63%) agree that, compared to 12 months ago, they use their mobile phone for more activities other than making calls and texting. However, the degree to which this is occurring across the globe varies between countries. Three distinct groups emerge when looking at the extent to which people use mobile devices: mature, developing and emerging markets (Figure 2).

    Emerging markets: South Africa, India, Saudi Arabia, Chile, China, Mexico

    Developing markets: Spain, Brazil, Russia, Colombia, Egypt

    Mature markets: Japan, USA, Germany, France, Australia, UK

    While emerging markets show a greater pace of change, mature regions appear more reserved. These groupings show significant differences in mobile appetite and mobile lifestyle. Enthusiasm for mobile devices is evidently stronger in devel-oping markets, and this leads to a stronger appetite for mobile phone use. Some 96% of users in emerging countries express a desire to use their mobile to buy goods or services in the future, compared to 59% in mature markets.

    Such is the relationship with mobile services in emerging markets that 75% of users agree that they rely on their mobile phone to help manage their lifestyle, compared to 69% in developing markets and 45% in mature markets.

    Figure2Agreement with statement: Compared to 12 months ago, I use my mobile phone for more activities other than making calls and texting/sending

    87%

    Mexico China Chile UKSpainBrazilRussiaColombiaEgyptSouthAfrica

    IndiaSaudiArabia

    USAGermanyFranceAustralia Japan

    86% 84% 83% 80% 74% 69% 67% 66% 63% 63% 50% 47% 47% 44% 38% 37%

    Emerging mobile markets Developing mobile markets Mature, saturated mobile markets

    Global 63%

    Maturity, Lifestyle and Work

  • The Mobile Consumer: Executive Summary

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    2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

    Yet the reliance on mobile seen in emerging markets is not a smartphone-only phenomenon (Figure 3). Only in mature regions is there a strong link between smartphone sophistication and lifestyle influence. In emerging and developing markets Internet-enabled and more basic devices are equally likely to influence owner lifestyles.

    Such is the reliance of mobile phones in emerging markets that 83% of users believe that having their mobile lost or stolen would really affect their personal productivity, compared to 70% in developing markets and 52% in mature markets.

    There are many factors that underpin these regional trends, but they can be summarised into three key areas:

    Economy: GDP growth and relative consumer momentum in BRIC and similar economies

    Infrastructure: Mobile network and mobile Internet services outperf