the alien in israelite lawby christiana van houten

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  • The Alien in Israelite Law by Christiana van HoutenReview by: Victor H. MatthewsJournal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 115, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1995), pp. 722-724Published by: American Oriental SocietyStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/604768 .Accessed: 18/06/2014 00:43

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  • Journal of the American Oriental Society 115.4 (1995) Journal of the American Oriental Society 115.4 (1995)

    Exegetisch-musikalische Beobachtungen zu der Motette, 'Fir- chte dich nicht, ich bin bei dir' (BWV 228)" (pp. 1-19), dis- cusses Bach's theological interpretation of texts from Isaiah 41 and 43 through dramatized music as an effective means of tra- dition transmission. Kai Brodersen, in "Salomon in Alexan- dria? Der weise Richter in 1 Konige 3, antiker Bildtradition und P. Oxy. 2944" (pp. 21-30), collects parallels to Solomon as wise judge in Greek texts and iconography from the fourth to the first centuries B.C., and concludes that the origin of the motif is probably to be found in Egypt. Russell Fuller, in "The

    Blessing of Levi in Deuteronomy 33, Malachi 2, and Qumran"

    (pp. 31-44), traces the reappropriation of the blessing in Mal.

    2:4-9, where Levi is an ideal of the past, and in 4Q175 and

    4Q177, where it is given eschatological reference to a priestly messiah. Dieter Georgi, in "Die Aristoteles- und Theophrast- ausgabe des Andronikus von Rhodes: Ein Beitrag zur Kanons-

    problematik" (pp. 45-78), challenges current notions of canon

    development. He suggests that the canon refers to the official sanction given to a defined collection of writings judged to em-

    body the faith, but only after the church became a state insti-

    tution and quite contrary to the attitude towards written texts in

    the early church. Manfred G6rg, in "Juda: Namesdeutung in

    Tradition und Etymologie" (pp. 79-87), proposes an Egyptian

    etymology for Judah, based on the verbal root HD and used with

    a divine name E1/Yhwh, meaning the god "vanquishes." Ingrid

    Grill-Ahollinger, in "Biblische Gattungen als didaktische Im-

    pulse im Religionsunterricht" (pp. 89-114), uses the form-

    critical and theological discussion of narrative as a pedagogical method in the German Gymnasium, with application to the

    David and Goliath story. Baruch Halpern, in "The Baal (and the Asherah) in Seventh-

    Century Judah: Yhwh's Retainers Retired" (pp. 115-54), argues that the "Israelite elite" at the end of the Iron Age arrived at

    monotheism by rejecting as foreign their own gods, the baCalim, who had previously been members of the heavenly court. Jorg Jeremias, in "Das unzugingliche Heiligtum: Zur letzten Vision

    des Amos (Am 9, 1-4)" (pp. 155-67), interprets the vision as

    a continuation of the earlier visions, but also as reflecting the

    Judean Zion tradition (cf. Isaiah 6). Kenichi Kida, in "The

    Sovereignty of God and the Destiny of the Nations in the

    Prophecies of Amos, Isaiah and Jeremiah" (pp. 169-81), sur-

    veys the application of social ethics in a universalistic context

    by these pre-exilic prophets. Hans Klein, in "Zur Wirkungsge- schichte von Psalm 8" (pp. 183-98), shows that the primary themes of Psalm 8 have a very different development in the

    Old Testament and Judaism from that in early Christianity. Only in the latter is there any messianic/Christological connection,

    and, in the case of Matthew, his understanding of the psalm leads him to modify the passion narrative. Helmut Koester, in

    "Jesu Leiden und Tod als Erzahlung" (pp. 199-204), suggests that the passion narrative developed as a liturgical legend in-

    terpreting Isaiah 53. Thomas Kriger, in "Genesis 38: Ein 'Lehr-

    stick' alttestamentlicher Ethik" (pp. 205-26), sees this text in

    Exegetisch-musikalische Beobachtungen zu der Motette, 'Fir- chte dich nicht, ich bin bei dir' (BWV 228)" (pp. 1-19), dis- cusses Bach's theological interpretation of texts from Isaiah 41 and 43 through dramatized music as an effective means of tra- dition transmission. Kai Brodersen, in "Salomon in Alexan- dria? Der weise Richter in 1 Konige 3, antiker Bildtradition und P. Oxy. 2944" (pp. 21-30), collects parallels to Solomon as wise judge in Greek texts and iconography from the fourth to the first centuries B.C., and concludes that the origin of the motif is probably to be found in Egypt. Russell Fuller, in "The

    Blessing of Levi in Deuteronomy 33, Malachi 2, and Qumran"

    (pp. 31-44), traces the reappropriation of the blessing in Mal.

    2:4-9, where Levi is an ideal of the past, and in 4Q175 and

    4Q177, where it is given eschatological reference to a priestly messiah. Dieter Georgi, in "Die Aristoteles- und Theophrast- ausgabe des Andronikus von Rhodes: Ein Beitrag zur Kanons-

    problematik" (pp. 45-78), challenges current notions of canon

    development. He suggests that the canon refers to the official sanction given to a defined collection of writings judged to em-

    body the faith, but only after the church became a state insti-

    tution and quite contrary to the attitude towards written texts in

    the early church. Manfred G6rg, in "Juda: Namesdeutung in

    Tradition und Etymologie" (pp. 79-87), proposes an Egyptian

    etymology for Judah, based on the verbal root HD and used with

    a divine name E1/Yhwh, meaning the god "vanquishes." Ingrid

    Grill-Ahollinger, in "Biblische Gattungen als didaktische Im-

    pulse im Religionsunterricht" (pp. 89-114), uses the form-

    critical and theological discussion of narrative as a pedagogical method in the German Gymnasium, with application to the

    David and Goliath story. Baruch Halpern, in "The Baal (and the Asherah) in Seventh-

    Century Judah: Yhwh's Retainers Retired" (pp. 115-54), argues that the "Israelite elite" at the end of the Iron Age arrived at

    monotheism by rejecting as foreign their own gods, the baCalim, who had previously been members of the heavenly court. Jorg Jeremias, in "Das unzugingliche Heiligtum: Zur letzten Vision

    des Amos (Am 9, 1-4)" (pp. 155-67), interprets the vision as

    a continuation of the earlier visions, but also as reflecting the

    Judean Zion tradition (cf. Isaiah 6). Kenichi Kida, in "The

    Sovereignty of God and the Destiny of the Nations in the

    Prophecies of Amos, Isaiah and Jeremiah" (pp. 169-81), sur-

    veys the application of social ethics in a universalistic context

    by these pre-exilic prophets. Hans Klein, in "Zur Wirkungsge- schichte von Psalm 8" (pp. 183-98), shows that the primary themes of Psalm 8 have a very different development in the

    Old Testament and Judaism from that in early Christianity. Only in the latter is there any messianic/Christological connection,

    and, in the case of Matthew, his understanding of the psalm leads him to modify the passion narrative. Helmut Koester, in

    "Jesu Leiden und Tod als Erzahlung" (pp. 199-204), suggests that the passion narrative developed as a liturgical legend in-

    terpreting Isaiah 53. Thomas Kriger, in "Genesis 38: Ein 'Lehr-

    stick' alttestamentlicher Ethik" (pp. 205-26), sees this text in

    critical dialogue with other Old Testament legal and religious traditions. Heinz-Wolfgang Kuhn, in "Die drei wichtigsten Qum-

    ranparallelen zum Galaterbrief: Unbekannte Wege der Tradi- tion" (pp. 227-54), explains Qumran's similarities with Paul as

    reflecting his background within Judaism. Norbert Lohfink, in "Zur Fabel in Dtn 31-32" (pp. 255-79), explores the "plot" or narrative structure of these chapters as a basis for their unity. Peter Marinkovic, in "Was wissen Wir uber den zweiten Tempel aus Sach 1-8?" (pp. 281-95), proposes that Zechariah is more concerned with the establishment of the Yhwh community than with the physical structure of the temple. Eckhard von Nord-

    heim, in "Das Gottesurteil als Schutzordeal fur die Frau nach Numeri 5" (pp. 297-309), asserts that, unlike the ordeals of the

    Middle Ages, the ordeal envisioned in Numbers 5 was never a

    physical threat to the woman undergoing it. Robert B. Robinson, in "The Coherence of the Jericho Narrative: A Literary Reading of Joshua 6" (pp. 311-35), gives a synchronic reading of the

    story. Josef Scharbert, in "Die Landverheissung an die Vater als

    einfache Zusage, als Eid und als 'Bund'" (pp. 337-54), traces

    the development of the land promise theme in the Pentateuch

    and Deuteronomistic corpus. Eberhard Schwarz, in "'Ziehet aus

    ihrer Mitte und sondert euch ab!' Abgrenzung als Ursprungssit- uation paulinischer Gemeindebildung: Beobachtungen zu 2 Kor

    6, 14-7, 1" (pp. 355-72), sees this as the initial stage in Paul's

    attempt to establish the C