the 10 herbal medicines approved by doh

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The 10 Herbal Medicines Approved by the Department of Health

This is the list of the ten (10) medicinal plants that the Philippine Department of Health (DOH) through its Traditional Health Program have endorsed. All ten (10) herbs have been thoroughly tested and have been clinically proven to have medicinal value in the relief and treatment of various ailments: 1. Akapulko (Cassia alata) also known as bayabas-bayabasan and ringworm bush in English, this herbal medicine is used to treat ringworms and skin fungal infections. 2. Ampalaya (Momordica charantia) known as bitter gourd or bitter melon in English, it most known as a treatment of diabetes (diabetes mellitus), for the non-insulin dependent patients. 3. Bawang (Allium sativum) popularly known as garlic, it mainly reduces cholesterol in the blood and hence, helps control blood pressure. 4. Bayabas (Psidium guajava) guava in English. It is primarily used as an antiseptic, to disinfect wounds. Also, it can be used as a mouth wash to treat tooth decay and gum infection. 5. Lagundi (Vitex negundo) known in English as the 5-leaved chaste tree. Its main use is for the relief of coughs and asthma. 6. Niyog-niyogan (Quisqualis indica L.) is a vine known as Chinese honey suckle. It is effective in the elimination of intestinal worms, particularly the Ascaris and Trichina. Only the dried matured seeds are medicinal -crack and ingest the dried seeds two hours after eating (5 to 7 seeds for children & 8 to 10 seeds for adults). If one dose does not eliminate the worms, wait a week before repeating the dose. 7. Sambong (Blumea balsamifera)- English name: Blumea camphora. A diuretic that helps in the excretion of urinary stones. It can also be used as an edema. 8. Tsaang Gubat (Ehretia microphylla Lam.) Prepared like tea, this herbal medicine is effective in treating intestinal motility and also used as a mouth wash since the leaves of this shrub has high fluoride content. 9. Ulasimang Bato (Peperomia pellucida) also known as pansit-pansitan it is effective in fighting arthritis and gout. The leaves can be eaten fresh (about a cupful) as salad or like tea. For the decoction, boil a cup of clean chopped leaves in 2 cups of water. Boil for 15 to 20 minutes. Strain, let cool and drink a cup after meals (3 times day). 10. Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii) commonly known as Peppermint, this vine is used as an analgesic to relive body aches and pain. It can be taken internally as a decoction or externally by pounding the leaves and applied directly on the afflicted area.

Tips on Handling Medicinal Plants / Herbs: o o o o o If possible, buy herbs that are grown organically without pesticides. Medicinal parts of plants are best harvested on sunny mornings. Avoid picking leaves, fruits or nuts during and after heavy rainfall. Leaves, fruits, flowers or nuts must be mature before harvesting. Less medicinal substances are found on young parts. After harvesting, if drying is required, it is advisable to dry the plant parts either in the oven or air-dried on screens above ground and never on concrete floors. Store plant parts in sealed plastic bags or brown bottles in a cool dry place without sunlight preferably with a moisture absorbent material like charcoal. Leaves and other plant parts that are prepared properly, well-dried and stored can be used up to six months. Tips on Preparation for Intake of Herbal Medicines: o o o o o Use only half the dosage prescribed for fresh parts like leaves when using dried parts. Do not use stainless steel utensils when boiling decoctions. Only use earthen, enamelled, glass or alike utensils. As a rule of thumb, when boiling leaves and other plant parts, do not cover the pot, and boil in low flame. Decoctions loose potency after some time. Dispose of decoctions after one day. To keep fresh during the day, keep lukewarm in a flask or thermos. Always consult with a doctor if symptoms persist or if any sign of allergic reaction develops. SOURCE:

http://www.philippineherbalmedicine.org/doh_herbs.htmhttp://www.mixph.com/2008/02/10-herbal-medicines-approved-by-doh.html

Philippine Herbal Medicine: Akapulko / Acapulco (Cassia alata)

Akapulko or Acapulco in English is a shrub found throughout the Philippines. It is known under various names in different regions in the country. Locals call the plant katanda, andadasi, and palochina in Tagalog, Ilocos and in the Visayas regions, respectively. The shrub belongs to the family ofLeguminosae, and grows about one to two meters tall. It has thick branches and the leaves are embraced with 8 to 20 leaflets that are oblong-elliptical in shape. The flowers of the Akapulko have oblong sepals, and its fruits are tetragonal, which are also winged and glabrous. A medicinal herb that contains chrysophanic acid, a fungicide used to treat fungal infections, like ringworms, scabies, and eczema. Akapulko also contains saponin, a laxative that is useful in expelling intestinal parasites. The primary part used for herbal purposes are the leaves, although the roots and flowers are also used for certain preparations with medicinal value. The extracts from the Akapulko plant is commonly used as an ingredient for lotions, soaps, and shampoos. Benefits & Treatment of Akapulko: External Use: Treatment of skin diseases: Tinea infections, insect bites, ringworms, eczema, scabies and itchiness. Mouthwash in stomatitis Internal use: Expectorant for bronchitis and dyspnoea Alleviation of asthma symptoms Used as diuretic and purgative For cough & fever As a laxative to expel intestinal parasites and other stomach problems. Note: A strong decoction of Akapulko leaves is an abortifacient. Pregnant women should not take decoction of the leaves or any part of this plant.

Preparation & Use: For external use, pound the leaves of the Akapulko plant, squeeze the juice and apply on affected areas. As the expectorant for bronchitis and dyspnoea, drink decoction (soak and boil for 10 to 15 minutes) of Akapulko leaves. The same preparation may be used as a mouthwash, stringent, and wash for eczema. As laxative, cut the plant parts (roots, flowers, and the leaves) into a manageable size then prepare a decoction Note: The decoction looses its potency if not used for a long time. Dispose leftovers after one day. The pounded leaves of Akapulko has purgative functions, specifically against ringworms. It should be noted that the pounded leaves of this plant may be applied thinly on the affected part twice a day. Marked improvement may be expected after two to three weeks of continuous application to the affected area(s) where the prepared Akapulko leaves were applied.

SOURCE: http://www.philippineherbalmedicine.org/akapulko.htm

Herbal Medicine: Ampalaya (Momordica charantia)

Ampalaya (Bitter Melon) with a scientific name Momordica charantia, is a climbing vine and the tendrils of which grow up to 20 centimeters long. This herbal plant belongs to the family of Cucurbitaceae, and it is a tropical as well as a subtropical vine. Ampalaya leaves are heart-shaped, which are 5 to 10 centimeters in diameter. The fruits of the ampalaya vine are fleshy green with pointed ends at length. It can never be mistaken for any other variety because its ribbed and wrinkled surface had always been ampalayas distinct physical structure. The bitter taste of the ampalaya fruit had also been the distinguishing factor from the rest of the fruits with medicinal value, and this is due to the presence of a substance known as momorcidin. Ampalaya has been a folkloric cure for generations but has now been proven to be an effective herbal medicine for many aliments. Most significant of which is for Diabetes. The Philippine variety has proven to be most potent. Ampalaya contains a mixture of flavanoids and alkaloids make the Pancreas produce more insulin that controls the blood sugar in diabetics. Aside from Ampalaya's medicinal value, it is good source of vitamins A, B and C, iron, folic acid, phosphorous and calcium. Ampalaya has been for used even by the Chinese for centuries. The effectively of Ampalaya as an herbal medicine has been tried and tested by many research clinics and laboratories worldwide. In the Philippines, the Department of Health has endorsed Ampalaya as an alternative medicine to help alleviate various ailments including diabetes, liver problems and even HIV. Aside from these, ampalaya also helps treat skin diseases and cough. Its herbal value extends to increasing the sterility of women, in parasiticide, antipyretic, and has purgative functions, as well. Note: In large dozes, pure Ampalaya juice can be a purgative and abortifacient.

Herbal Benefits of Ampalaya: Good for rheumatism and gout And diseases of the spleen and liver Aids in lowering blood sugar levels Helps in lowering blood pressure Relives headaches Disinfects and heals wounds & burns Can be used as a cough & fever remedy Treatment of intestinal worms, diarrhea Helps prevent some types of cancer Enhances immune system to fight infection For treatment of hemorrhoids Is an antioxidant and parasiticide Is antibacterial and antipyretic

Preparation & Use of Ampalaya: For coughs, fever, worms, diarrhea, diabetes, juice Ampalaya leaves and drink a spoonful daily. For other ailments, the fruit and leaves can both be juiced and taken orally. For headaches wounds, burns and skin diseases, apply warmed leaves to afflicted area. Powdered leaves, and the root decoction, may be used as stringent and applied to treat hemorrhoids. Internal parasites are proven to be expelled when the ampalaya juice, made from its leaves, is extracted. The ampalaya juice, and grounded seeds is to be taken one spoonful thrice a day, which also treats diarrhea, dysentery, and chronic colitis.

SOURCE: http://www.philippineherbalmedicine.org/ampalaya.htm

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