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  • Teacher Activity

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/teacher activity

    Cold Station

    Ring The Alarm!

    Station Electricity

    Fruit Conductors

    How Elevator Save Energy

    Are You A suggish Snail Or A Turbon

    Pressure

    WaterCraft

    No Sucker

    PE

    TR

    O S A I N S

  • x

    Introduction

    These activities introduce the concept of atmospheric pressure and its application in our daily life.At the end of the activities, students should be able to understand principles of basic pressure and how a vacuum cleaner works.

    1. NO SUCKER

    What do we need?

    What do we do?

    1. Fill the plastic bottle with some drinking water.

    Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

    Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

    PRESSURE

    1 Knife/bladeAn empty plastic bottle Drinking water Some plasticine

    2. Using a knife/blade, poke a hole in the bottle cap big enough for a straw.

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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    O S A I N S

    x

  • Whats happening?Water could not come through the straw. When you drink from an open glass of water, air pressure allows the water to travel up the straw. When you reduce the pressure inside your mouth (by suck-ing on the straw), the surrounding air pressure pushes down on the water and forces the liquid up the straw. When the bottle cap is sealed, there is no air pressure to help push the water up the straw to go into your mouth.

    3. Put the straw into the water through the hole in the lid and seal up the space around the straw with some plasticine.

    4. Try to suck through the straw. Did the water go into your mouth?

    Prepared by: Aziah YahayaTeacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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    O S A I N S

  • 2. Now cut a slit down one side of the bottom third of the bottle. This will allow you to slide it through the top part of the bottle so that it can act as a piston.

    3. Cut a 6 x 3 strip of paper and fold it in half lengthwise for extra strength. Tape this strip to the opened part of the bottom third of the bottle to make a handle for your piston.

    4. For the top part of the bottle, cut a inch hole about 1 inches below the neck. This hole will lead to the lter bag.

    5. Make a lter bag for your vacuum with a 6 x 4 piece of tissue paper. Fold the paper rectangle in half and tape the sides to make a bag. Tape this over the hole you made near the neck of the bottle.

    6. Tape one end of a thread to a ping-pong ball. Put the ball inside the top part of the bottle. Feed the free end of the thread through the mouth of the bottle, and tape it to the outside of the bottle so the ping-pong ball hangs just slightly below the neck.

    Prepared by: Aziah YahayaTeacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

    PE

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    O S A I N S

  • IntroductionA vacuum cleaner is able to suck dirt o carpet because high pressure air from the outside ows towards the low pressure air inside. The higher pressure air outside the vacuum is sucked in to replace the lower pressure air, bringing dirt and dust with it to be caught in the lter bag.

    What do we do?

    1. Cut o the soda bottle about of the way up from its base.

    Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

    Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

    2. A VACUUM CLEANER

    1 razor Knife/blade

    1 A4 paper Adhesive tape 1 ping-pong ball

    Some tissue paper

    Some thread

    One 1.5L plastic soda bottle

    What do we need?

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

    PE

    TR

    O S A I N S

  • Whats happening?

    Pulling the piston back decreases the air pressure inside the bottle, as there is bigger space for the same amount of air (volume of space increases). The lower pressure air inside the bottle creates suction, pulling in higher pressure air from outside in through the mouth of the bottle. As you push the piston, the air is compressed and pressure increases in the vacuum, so air ows back out of the bottle. The ping-pong ball works as a valve.

    The table below shows how the atmospheric pressure varies with altitude.

    Fraction 1 atm Avg. altitude in meters

    1 0

    5486.3

    1/3 8375.8

    1/10 16131.9

    1/100 30900.9

    1/1000 48467.2

    1/10000 69463.6

    1/100000 96281.6

    The Earths atmospheric pressure varies broadly and these changes are important in

    meteorology. The recorded atmospheric pressure during hurricane Wilma on 19th October

    2005 was 33.2 kPa (882mbar or 66.8 cmHg).

    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure (1/12/2006, 10:10 AM)

    Curriculum Specifications Link

    Physics Form 4: Pressure (Atmospheric pressure)

    Prepared by: Aziah YahayaTeacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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    7. Push the bottom cut-o part of the bottle into the upper part of bottle, and then pull it back sharply.

  • Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

    Sluggish Snail or charged Cheetah?

    Two peopleA calculatorA meter ruler

    IntroductionHow fast is your reaction?

    What do we need?

    What do we do?1. Hold the metre ruler with its zero reading pointing downwards.

    2. Person A positions his/her thumb and index ngers 8cm apart at chest level at a comfortable distance from the body.

    3. Person B holds the metre ruler inbetween Person As ngers.

    3. Person B drops the ruler straight down suddenly.

    4. Person A grabs the ruler upon its release and holds it.

    5. Take the reading where the subject grabbed the ruler.

    6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 thrice for an average reading.

    7. Convert the distance into milliseconds using this formula:

    8. Tabulate all data and look for eects on the reex time of subject of a dierent age and sex.e.g.

    1000480

    =dt

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher ActivityPrepared by: Chin Chee Keong

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  • or

    Sex Reaction time (millisecond)

    Female

    Male

    or

    Physical activity Reaction time (millisecond)

    Before push-ups

    After 20 push-ups

    Whats happening ?

    Nervous responses to environmental stimuli are fast and only takes a small fraction of a

    second to be completedThe body must react quickly to avoid painful or dangerous

    stimuli. Various factors affect our reaction time.

    Curriculum Specifications Link:

    Science Form 2: The World Through Our Senses

    Biology Form 5: Body Coordination System

    Age range (years) Reaction time (millisecond)

    26-30

    31-35

    36-40

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher ActivityPrepared by: Chin Chee Keong

    PE

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    O S A I N S

  • Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

    Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

    Masking tapeA pair of rubber gloves A stopwatch A pair of plastic gloves

    Some Vaseline or shortening A container half-lled with ice water

    COLD STATION

    1. RUBBER BLUBBER GLOVES

    Introduction

    How do sea mammals survive in the cold sea water? Lets nd out!

    What do we need?

    What do we do?

    1. Take its temperature of the ice water in the container.

    2. Dip your hand into the ice water and start the stopwatch. How long can you keep it there before it gets too cold for you?

    3. Take your hand out of the ice water and let it warm to your normal body temperature.

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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    O S A I N S

    A thermometer

  • Whats happening?

    Sea mammals like whales and seals have a thick layer of fat underneath their skin called blubber. The blubber keeps them warm. The layer of shortening on your right hand glove helps to reduce loss of heat from your hand to the ice water.

    4. Now put on rubber gloves on both hands. Carefully insert the thermometer into each glove.

    5. Apply a thick layer of shortening over the rubber gloves of your right hand.

    6. Put on plastic gloves over both hands and secure it with masking tape.

    7. Dip both hands into the container of ice water.

    8. Start the stopwatch. How long can you keep your hands in there?

    9. Remove your hands after 5 minutes. Which hand feels cooler?

    10. Check the reading of the temperature. Which one shows a lower temperature?

    Prepared by: Chin Chee KeongTeacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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    O S A I N S

  • Introduction

    How does a cold environment aect our sense of touch?

    What do we need?

    What do we do?

    1. Break a toothpick into 3 smaller pieces. Do this with all the 5 toothpicks.

    2. Use a thumbtack to make one small hole on the lid of the plastic container. The small hole must be big enough for the toothpicks to pass through.

    Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

    2. ICY FINGERS

    A stopwatch5 toothpicks A thumbtack A small plate

    A plastic container with lid A container of ice cubes

    Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Teacher Activity

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  • 3. Start the stopwatch as you begin to pick up a small toothpick from the plate and insert it into the plastic container through the small hole. How long did you take to nish inserting all the 15 pieces of toothpicks?

    4. Now dip the same hand into a container of ice for 30 seconds. Dry your hand, pick up the broken toothpicks and insert the

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