Survival Is Not Enough: Soviet Realities and America's Futureby Richard Pipes

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  • Survival Is Not Enough: Soviet Realities and America's Future by Richard PipesReview by: John C. CampbellForeign Affairs, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Winter, 1984), p. 423Published by: Council on Foreign RelationsStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20042227 .Accessed: 17/06/2014 00:28

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  • RECENT BOOKS 423

    The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

    John C. Campbell SURVIVAL IS NOT ENOUGH: SOVIET REALITIES AND AMERI CA'S FUTURE. By Richard Pipes. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984, 288 pp. $16.95.

    Professor Pipes, the Reagan Administration's guru on this subject, pre sents a cogent, consistent and comprehensive statement of his thoughts on

    Soviet grand strategy for global hegemony, together with some proposals on what to do about it. He places himself neither among the doves, with their faith in pragmatism, good will and d?tente, nor among the hawks,

    with their concentration on military strength and containment. A main theme is the connection between the U.S.S.R.'s internal system and its

    foreign policy, and the need for the West to intensify the crisis in the former in order to cope with the latter.

    THE BREZHNEV POLITBURO AND THE DECLINE OF D?TENTE. By Harry Gelman. Ithaca (N.Y.): Cornell University Press, 1984, 264 pp. $29.95 (paper, $9.95).

    For many years Harry Gelman was a senior analyst of Soviet affairs in the CIA. His review of Soviet foreign policy in the Brezhnev era deserves careful attention because of that background and his obvious skills in the

    interpretation of the available evidence. The account of the continuing contention for power among the leaders is naturally of interest, but more

    important is the theme of the Politburo's consistent pursuit of political advantage in competition with the principal political adversary, the United States. Brezhnev is shown as led toward d?tente by his own political needs in relations with his colleagues, by objective factors, and by well-established

    priorities, and later led away from it for the same reasons. A book on this

    subject is bound to raise many controversial points, but it is not easy, on

    any sober reading of the evidence we have, to challenge the main line of

    argument presented here.

    NOMENKLATURA: THE SOVIET RULING CLASS. By Michael Vos

    lensky. New York: Doubleday, 1984, 455 pp. $19.95. A clinical dissection of the Soviet system, in which a group of managers

    and bureaucrats (some 1.5 percent of the population) are engaged in ceaseless political maneuvering among themselves while maintaining total

    power, as a privileged class, over all the others. The author, who left the Soviet Union in 1977, follows his argument to its logical conclusion: the

    impossibility of basic change, either toward liberalization of the internal order or toward modification of an aggressive foreign policy. This study of Soviet experience since Lenin evokes Milovan Djilas's analysis of the "new class" published some 30 years ago; appropriately, Djilas contributes a brief

    preface to the book.

    INSIDE SOVIET MILITARY INTELLIGENCE. By Viktor Suvorov. New York: Macmillan, 1984, 208 pp. $15.95.

    Carrying on with his revelations about the Soviet military establishment

    (see Inside the Soviet Army, noted in Foreign Affairs, Winter 1983/84), a former Soviet army officer draws a portrait of the military intelligence apparatus and how it works, especially its balancing role in relation to the

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    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    Article Contentsp. 423

    Issue Table of ContentsForeign Affairs, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Winter, 1984), pp. A1-A12, 219-286, A13-A20, 287-358, A21-A24, 359-440, A25-A42Front MatterAfter the ElectionForeign Policy under Reagan II [pp. 219-239]

    Arms ControlArms Control with and without Agreements [pp. 240-263]The President's Choice: Star Wars or Arms Control [pp. 264-278]

    A Divided EuropeThe Future of Yalta [pp. 279-302]The German Question Transformed [pp. 303-315]The New Deutschlandpolitik [pp. 316-329]

    The European Pillar [pp. 330-343]The World Economy: The Dollar and the Summit [pp. 344-359]Living with the Soviets [pp. 360-374]Papandreou's Foreign Policy [pp. 375-391]The Philippines in Crisis [pp. 392-410]Recent Books on International RelationsGeneral: Political and LegalReview: untitled [p. 411-411]Review: untitled [p. 411-411]Review: untitled [p. 411-411]Review: untitled [p. 412-412]

    General: Military, Technological, and ScientificReview: untitled [p. 412-412]Review: untitled [pp. 412-413]Review: untitled [p. 413-413]Review: untitled [p. 413-413]Review: untitled [pp. 413-414]Review: untitled [p. 414-414]

    General: Economic and SocialReview: untitled [pp. 414-415]Review: untitled [p. 415-415]Review: untitled [p. 415-415]Review: untitled [p. 415-415]Review: untitled [p. 415-415]Review: untitled [pp. 415-416]Review: untitled [p. 416-416]Review: untitled [p. 416-416]Review: untitled [pp. 416-417]

    The United StatesReview: untitled [p. 417-417]Review: untitled [p. 417-417]Review: untitled [pp. 417-418]Review: untitled [p. 418-418]Review: untitled [pp. 418-419]Review: untitled [p. 419-419]Review: untitled [p. 419-419]

    The Western HemisphereReview: untitled [p. 419-419]Review: untitled [p. 420-420]Review: untitled [p. 420-420]Review: untitled [pp. 420-421]

    Western EuropeReview: untitled [p. 421-421]Review: untitled [p. 421-421]Review: untitled [pp. 421-422]Review: untitled [p. 422-422]Review: untitled [p. 422-422]Review: untitled [p. 422-422]

    The Soviet Union and Eastern EuropeReview: untitled [p. 423-423]Review: untitled [p. 423-423]Review: untitled [p. 423-423]Review: untitled [pp. 423-424]Review: untitled [p. 424-424]Review: untitled [p. 424-424]Review: untitled [p. 424-424]Review: untitled [p. 424-424]Review: untitled [pp. 424-425]Review: untitled [p. 425-425]Review: untitled [p. 425-425]Review: untitled [p. 425-425]Review: untitled [p. 425-425]

    The Middle EastReview: untitled [p. 426-426]Review: untitled [p. 426-426]Review: untitled [p. 426-426]Review: untitled [pp. 426-427]Review: untitled [p. 427-427]Review: untitled [p. 427-427]Review: untitled [pp. 427-428]

    Asia and the PacificReview: untitled [p. 428-428]Review: untitled [p. 428-428]Review: untitled [pp. 428-429]Review: untitled [p. 429-429]Review: untitled [p. 429-429]Review: untitled [pp. 429-430]Review: untitled [p. 430-430]

    AfricaReview: untitled [p. 430-430]Review: untitled [p. 430-430]Review: untitled [pp. 430-431]Review: untitled [p. 431-431]Review: untitled [p. 431-431]Review: untitled [p. 431-431]Review: untitled [p. 431-431]Review: untitled [p. 432-432]

    Source Material [pp. 433-440]Back Matter