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  • Staying StrongStrategies for building resilience during times of pressure

  • Updates: What has struck you from the Horizons programme so far? What have you done as a result of your learning and what has been the impact of this?

    What current leadership challenges do you face?

    How resilient are you feeling? Scale 1-10

    Realise there is a lot of change happening During times of change our personal resilience can take a hit - Im not here to run a theoretical session around resilience but to share with you a few models and for you to try these out How we want to work with each other todayWorkbook include content you may want to reflect on following todays session

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  • How to apply the BOUNCE methodology to build 6 core resilience factors How to maintain high performance and wellbeing during times of stressStrategies to manage your energy and optimise your strengths in the face of difficultySpecific techniques to deal effectively with setbacks and negative eventsHow to build and leverage your social support network to help overcome challenges

    What you will learn

    Not just survival but thriving during stressful timesManage your energy, not your time Tony Schwartz - Whenever we are struggling under more workload, the first thing is to stop what were doing and think about a better way to manage our energy, not to add more work hours to our days.Techniques looking at controlExercise and nutrition a concept called Physical energyPower of social support And recent research around building resilience by using strengths and stretching ourselves

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  • Work-related stress is widespread

    40 % staff reported feeling unwell as a result of stress

    ..promoting the idea that humans can flourish in the workplace, by ensuring that staff have opportunities for growth and development, the experience of supportive relationships at work, work environments that promote their physical health, and leaders who provide the resources that enable them to cope effectively with the demands of their work..

    Work-related stress is widespread among staff in the NHS; last year, according to the NHS Staff Survey, nearly 40 per cent of staff reported feeling unwell as a result of stress.blockChronic stress can have significant impacts on physical and mental health, being implicated in heart disease, early mortality, depression and a wide variety of psychosocial disorders. In effect, NHS staff are more likely than the rest of the working population to become patients, increasing demands on the system they work in.Moreover, the Care Quality Commission says poor staff health and wellbeing in NHS provider organisations is associated with poorer-quality patient care, lower levels of patient satisfaction and high levels of absenteeism. The ability of staff to pay close attention to patients, to have empathic responses and take intelligent action to help is detrimentally affected by high and chronic levels of stress.What are we to do? One solution is to introduce health and wellbeing strategies for stressed staff, offering massage, yoga, mindfulness, exercise and dietary advice. But although these are worthy interventions, they do not address the root causes of the problem.Research has shown that the most important factor contributing to stress is workload, with staff simply being asked to manage too much work. Another is a lack of clear roles knowing what the objectives, requirements and limits of their responsibilities are. Other factors include bullying and harassment (particularly by managers and other staff), discrimination, lack of resources, conflict, and dealing with pain and suffering. These core problems are to do with organisational culture and processes, so the solutions need to address organisational causes. We cannot just rely on health and wellbeing strategies as fig leaves for inaction around management, structures and culture.If we are to address the causes of stress at work then we need to nurture cultures that ensure a focus on providing the high-quality, compassionate care that NHS staff wish to provide. This means that leaders must have an unwavering focus on ensuring commitment to quality of care. As I have said before, absolutely key to this is developing, selecting, promoting and empowering leaders to nurture such cultures. But we also need to move swiftly away from unhealthy command-and-control cultures and this requires a comprehensive and wholesale change in the way in which leadership is developed and understood in the NHS.It is not enough simply to aim to reduce staff stress levels. We should be promoting the idea that humans can flourish in the workplace, by ensuring that staff have opportunities for growth and development, the experience of supportive relationships at work, work environments that promote their physical health, and leaders who provide the resources that enable them to cope effectively with the demands of their work.There are some organisations in the NHS that are making progress towards understanding how to reduce stress levels and promote staff wellbeing, and others should be striving to do the same. But NHS organisations must also look beyond the sector for outstanding examples of organisations both nationally and internationally that have shown how to create positive work environments and promote human health and wellbeing, rather than damage their staff. It is right that the NHS should aspire to be a model in this regard, rather than the bad example it currently is.*

  • How negative stress arisesStress occurs when the demands of a situation exceed the persons ability to control them

    Stress is internal it depends on how the person views their situation

    The more you believe you have control over the situation, the lower your stress

    stress occurs when the perceived pressure exceeds your perceived ability to cope

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  • Data Collection:Online surveysStrengths Engagement IndexFeedbackPerformance AppraisalsVideo StoriesBusiness Results

    Adapted from Robert Yerkes and John Dodson

    Stress is positive when the person feels stimulated and able to manage the situation. This positive response prepares the body for action and activates the higher thinking centers of the brain. A positive response to stress can provide the energy to handle emergencies, meet challenges, and excel.

    Stress is negative when a person feels threatened and not in control of the situation. These feelings instigate a powerful reaction affecting both the brain and body in ways that can be destructive to physical and mental health.Incidents of stress related illness rising heart disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's Over 80% of workers feel stresses at work and over 70% of healthcare visits due to stress related conditions

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  • Changes to sleep patterns Headaches/migraines Comfort eating Increase in number of colds Nausea Increased tiredness Poor time management Increased smoking/alcohol/caffeine Unable to concentrate

    Signs and symptoms of stress

    Different people respond to stress in different ways

    Symptoms can be a combination of emotional, psychological or physiological ones

  • In your toolkit, tick as many of the stress symptoms you identify in yourself.

    Reflect on where they are situated? Are they clustered into one area or is there an even spread?

    Your own stress symptoms

  • What is resilience?

  • Having the strength and flexibility to deal effectively with set-backs and challengesBrewerton and Brook, 2006

    The ability to adapt in the face of adversity, trauma or tragedy. The American Psychological Association

    The positive capacity of people to cope with stress and adversity. This coping may result in the individual bouncing back to a previous state of normal functioning, or using the experience of exposure to adversity to produce a Steeling effect and function better then expectedMasten, 2009

    Resilience Defined

    What do we mean by resilience?

    What do you think of the quotes?

    Do you think some people resilient and others not?

    NEXT SLIDE so how can we build resilience?

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  • Using BOUNCE to build resilience

    BOUNCE is a simple model based on research from American Psychological society Harvard business Review and medical research shows 6 steps to build resilience

    BBuild a social support network

    OOptimise your Mind set U Understand your StrengthsNNurture yourself CControl the Controllables EExecute a plan *

  • BOUNCE BBuild a social support network

    OOptimise your mindset U Understand your StrengthsNNurture yourself CControl the Controllables EEnable yourself to deliver

  • BOUNCE QUIZ In your toolkit, complete the brief quiz to see how you score on the following resilience factors

  • BOUNCE BBuild a social support network

    OOptimise your mindset U Understand your StrengthsNNurture yourself CControl the Controllables EEnable yourself to deliver

  • Building Support High levels of social support have been associated with improved psychological and physiological health:

    Reveal slide from previous questionsCuddling people/puppies/kittens releases the same hormoneAlso if you are stuck and unable to come up with a solution cuddles can help us think these through.

    NEXT SLIDE have a go and thinking through your support network

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  • Your Social Support Network

    Who gives you energy and who drains your energy so important to cut out our energy drainers doesnt help our own well being and resilience. Balance drainers with those who give energy

    NEXT SLIDE Plot your support network on this grid and in small groups discuss the following*

  • Building SupportIn pairs or small groups:Who ca