Social media and political literacy Transforming lives through learning Social Media, Digital Learning and Political Literacy Professional Learning Resource

Download Social media and political literacy Transforming lives through learning Social Media, Digital Learning and Political Literacy Professional Learning Resource

Post on 29-Dec-2015

218 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

<p>PowerPoint Presentation</p> <p>Social Media, Digital Learning and Political LiteracyProfessional Learning Resource for PractitionersSocial media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacy1ContentsMedia Literacy Social Media and US ElectionsSocial Media and Scottish ReferendumThe Impact of Social Media on Political DebateYoung People and Social MediaDigital Research SkillsDigital Debate and Participation SkillsDigital Rights</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacy2012 US Presidential ElectionSocial media established as a vital campaign tool for politicians and voters.</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySourcehttp://www.adweek.com/socialtimes/social-media-politics-infographic/4717385Social media during the Scottish referendum18 Sep 2014: Polls open = 898,750 conversations11 Sep 2014: Scots want to change postal votes = 251,513 conversations13 Sep 2014: Three opinion polls say to close to call = 233, 361 conversations25 Aug 2014: TV debate = 137,404 conversations5 Aug 2014: TV debate = 89,843 conversations</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:http://wallblog.co.uk/2014/09/23/infographic-the-scottish-referendum-in-online-stats/Source:http://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2014/09/18/scottish-independence-the-social-media-battle-infographic/</p> <p>6TED X talk: The impact of social media onpolitical debateDr.Mark Shephard studied the content of thousands of social media posts for research into social media and the Scottish independence referendum debate online.He illustrates tips on what to spot and what mistakes to avoid when posting online.</p> <p>Watch here (12 mins): http://ed.ted.com/on/EMKPkQQ1#watch </p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyFlaming keys and 5 FsTweeting</p> <p>Tipsy tweeting</p> <p>Tanked tweeting</p> <p>FOUL = writing abusive, rude commentsFALSE = fallacious or generalised postFOGGY = unclear language or behaviourFLANNEL = unnecessary repetition about a point or commentFLAMING = over exaggeration using too many capitals or exclamation marks etc.</p> <p>DONT DRINK AND DIGIT!Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyLABOUR WIN</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:https://www.integritysearch.co.uk/infographics/social-media-statistics-general-election-2015/</p> <p>9</p> <p>UKIPWINSocial media and political literacy</p> <p>Transforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:https://www.integritysearch.co.uk/infographics/social-media-statistics-general-election-2015/</p> <p>10</p> <p>GREENWINSocial media and political literacy</p> <p>Transforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:https://www.integritysearch.co.uk/infographics/social-media-statistics-general-election-2015/</p> <p>11Social media during 2015 General Election</p> <p>CONSERVATIVEWINSocial media and political literacy</p> <p>Transforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:https://www.integritysearch.co.uk/infographics/social-media-statistics-general-election-2015/</p> <p>12How useful is social media in researching, debating and participating in democracyWatch clips from Adam Konner, Barack Obamas social media strategist.</p> <p>How is social media changing politics?</p> <p>Should politicians pay attention to social media?https://vimeo.com/57540926Does social media motivate you to engage with politics offline?https://vimeo.com/57540928What is the impact of social media? Does it reinforce your opinion or reflect diversity?https://vimeo.com/57540927 Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySource:http://www.debatingeurope.eu/2013/01/22/how-is-social-media-changing-politics/#.VdH0-PlVikp</p> <p>13How do young people use social media?How many social media platforms can you name?Describe the social media habits of your own children or the young people you work with?Are there generational similarities and differences in how we use social media?</p> <p>70% of UK children aged 12-15 who online have a social media profile6 in 10 children aged 12-15 use the interneton their own most of the timeSocial media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacySourcehttp://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/media-literacy/media-use-attitudes-14/Childrens_2014_Report.pdf</p> <p>14Social media and digital content:Suggested aims for practitioners and young peopleUnderstand the different forms of social media and how these tools can be used for sharing information, debate and discussion. Find examples of at least two different kinds of social media, blogs, video / podcasting sites that you can follow and use. </p> <p>Understand how to use social media safely and what to do if you have any concerns or problems. Reflect on what you like or dislike about using social media and how you might want to use it yourself or for your projects. Interact with other social media users. </p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyAims taken from: http://digitalcommonwealth.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/digital-storytelling-handbook.pdf15Digital research: WebQuestsAn online lesson with 6 componentsPromotes higher order questions and critical thinking skillsTeacher preselects the sources emphasizing information use rather than information gatheringCollaborative promotes cooperative learning methodsWebQuests: http://webquest.organ inquiry based method to conduct research using the Internet.Use Glow365 software like PowerPoint, OneNote or WordOr free WebQuest websites:http://www.createwebquest.com/http://zunal.com/index.php</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacy6 components of a WebQuestIntroduction: The introduction section provides background information and motivational scenarios like giving students roles to play: "You are an underwater research scientist," or "You are an astronaut planning a trip to the moon." It also provides an overview of the learning goals to students.Task: The task is a formal description of what students will have accomplished by the end of the WebQuest.Process:This is a description of the steps learners should go through in accomplishing the task, with links embedded in each step.Resources: This section of the WebQuest consists of a list of the resources (bookmarked Web sites, print resources, etc.) that your students will need to complete the task.Evaluation: Each WebQuest needs a rubric for evaluating students' work. The standards should be fair, clear, consistent, and specific to the tasks set. Conclusion: This step allows for reflection by the students and summation by the teacher.</p> <p>16Digital participation:Handbook of Digital StorytellingDownloadable resource offering equipment suggestions, contexts for learning and top tips for the 4 key digital skills of:http://digitalcommonwealth.co.uk/2014/09/18/handbook-of-digital-storytelling/ </p> <p>BloggingVideoAudioSocial media</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyDuring 2014, Digital Commonwealth ran a schools programme involving primary and secondary learners from across Scotlands 32 local authorities, delivering in-school workshops on digital storytelling using audio, video, blogging and social media with supporting hard and e-copy learning materials.17BLOGGING / QUIZ DISCUSSIONVIDEO / AUDIOSOCIAL MEDIA DIGITAL STORYTELLINGGlow Wordpress Blogs</p> <p>Padlet</p> <p>Medium</p> <p>KahootsYouTube</p> <p>Vimeo</p> <p>Audioboom</p> <p>Adobe VoiceTwitter</p> <p>Facebook</p> <p>Instagram</p> <p>Pinterest</p> <p>Class Tools(for lots of applications) Glow Wikis</p> <p>Office Sway</p> <p>Prezi</p> <p>BookCreator</p> <p>Paper.li</p> <p>Storify</p> <p>Digital participation: suggested apps and web services18iRights: well informed 21st Century citizensiRights seeks to make the digital world a moretransparent and empowering place for children and young people (under 18)by delivering a universal framework of digital rights, in order that young peopleare able to access digital technologies creatively, knowledgeably and fearlessly.</p> <p>http://irights.uk</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyThe 5 iRightsThe Right to REMOVE</p> <p>The Right toKNOW</p> <p>The Right toSAFETY ANDSUPPORT</p> <p>The Right toINFORMED AND CONSCIOUS CHOICES</p> <p>The Right toDIGITAL LITERACY</p> <p>Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacyThe Right to REMOVEEvery child and young person should have the right toeasily edit or delete all content they have created</p> <p>The Right toKNOWChildren and young people have the right to know whois holding or profiting from their information, what theirinformation is being used for and whether it is beingcopied, sold or traded</p> <p>The Right toSAFETY ANDSUPPORTChildren and young people should be confident that theywill be protected from illegal practices and supported ifconfronted by troubling or upsetting scenarios online</p> <p>The Right toINFORMED AND CONSCIOUS CHOICESChildren and young people should be empowered to reachinto creative places online, but at the same time have thecapacity and support to easily disengage</p> <p>The Right toDIGITAL LITERACYTo access the knowledge that the Internet can deliver,children and young people need to be taught the skills touse, create and critique digital technologies, and giventhe tools to negotiate changing social norms20iRights linksWatch the animated film about iRightshttp://irights.uk Look at the young persons version http://irights.uk/young-persons-version/How could you use the iRights with children and young people to reflect on and improve digital and online participation, including social media?Social media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacy</p> <p>Education ScotlandDenholm HouseAlmondvale Business ParkAlmondvale WayLivingston EH54 6GA</p> <p>T +44 (0)141 282 5000E enquiries@educationscotland.gov.ukwww.educationscotland.gov.uk</p> <p> Image Copyright - The Noun Project: Mazil, Ryan Beck, Luis Prado, Marek Polakovic, Blake Thompson, Creative Stall, Darin S, Brennan Novak, riyazali, Ahmed Elzahra, Desbenoit, Julynn B, Baruch Moskovits, Simple Icons, Geral Wildmoser, Mathieu Dedebant, Jon Prepeluh, Mourad Mokrane, Sarah Joy, Evan MacDonald, Juan Pablo Bravo, Dan Hetteix, Arthur ShlainSocial media and political literacyTransforming lives through learningTransforming lives through learningSocial media and political literacy22</p>