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In ROUGH STUFF #2, editor (and top pro inker) BOB McLEOD spotlights more NEVER-BEFORE PUBLISHED penciled pages, preliminary sketches, detailed layouts, and unused inked versions of art from throughout comics history! There's an interview with PAUL GULACY, andt lengthy galleries of work by fan-favorite artists FRANK BRUNNER, JERRY ORDWAY, and MATT WAGNER, who contribute commentaries on pencils, sketches, and more from some of their most beloved comics series—discussing what went right and wrong with it, and giving background information to put it all into historical perspective. Also: A pencil art spotlight on BRIAN APTHORP! A retrospective art gallery on the late comics legend ALEX TOTH! Plus: Before-and-after comparisons revealing how images changed from initial concept to published version, a look at oddball penciler/inker combinations, and more, all behind a new GULACY “Hex” cover!

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  • FRA

    NK BRUNNERJERR

    Y ORDWAY

    BRIAN APTHORP

    MATT WAGNER

    P R E S E N T S

    N o . 2F a l l 2 0 0 6

    $ 6 . 9 5

    C e l e b r a t i n gt h e A R T

    o f C r e a t i n gC om i c s !

    Jonah Hex, Sandman, Superman, Atom, Superman, Supergirl, Batman TM & 2006 DC Comics.

    FeaturingFeaturing

    PAUL GULACY!PAUL GULACY!Interview &Art Gallery

    ALEX TOTH

    1 82658 27766 6

    63

  • OCTOBER 2006 ROUGH STUFF 1

    Volume 1, Number 2October 2006

    Celebrating the ART of Creating Comics!

    EDITORBob McLeod

    PUBLISHERJohn Morrow

    DESIGNERMichael Kronenberg

    PROOFREADERSJohn Morrow and Christopher Irving

    COVER ARTISTPaul Gulacy

    COVER COLORISTLaurie Kronenberg

    CIRCULATION DIRECTORBob Brodsky, Seastone Marketing Group

    SPECIAL THANKSBrian ApthorpFrank BrunnerPaul GulacyJerry OrdwayAlex TothMatt WagnerRay WongEric Nolen-WeathingtonRoger ClarkDavid HamiltonKen SteacyMichael Eury

    ROUGH STUFF is published quarterly byTwoMorrows Publishing, 10407 Bedfordtown Drive,Raleigh, NC 27614. Bob McLeod, Editor. JohnMorrow, Publisher. Editorial Office: ROUGH STUFF,c/o Bob McLeod, Editor, P.O. Box 63, Emmaus, PA10849-2203. E-mail: mcleod.bob@gmail.com. Four-issue subscriptions: $24 Standard US, $36 FirstClass US, $44 Canada, $48 Surface International,$64 Airmail International. Please send subscriptionorders and funds to TwoMorrows, NOT to the edi-torial office. Central cover art by Paul Gulacy.Jonah Hex TM & 2006 DC Comics. All charactersare their respective companies. All material their creators unless otherwise noted. All editorialmatter 2006 Bob McLeod and TwoMorrowsPublishing. ROUGH STUFF is a TM of TwoMorrowsPublishing. Printed in Canada. FIRST PRINTING.

    FEATURED ARTISTS3 Brian Apthorp

    14 Frank Brunner

    50 Jerry Ordway

    61 Alex Toth

    73 Matt Wagner

    ROUGH STUFF INTERVIEW30 Paul Gulacy

    ROUGH STUFF FEATURE46 A Special Memento

    Ray Wong

    ROUGH STUFF DEPARTMENTS2 Scribblings From The Editor

    Bob McLeod

    26 Cover StoriesPaul Gulacy and Frank Brunner reveal the process they go throughwhen creating a cover.

    48 PreProA look at the art of the pros, before they were pros.

    84 Rough CritiqueEditor Bob McLeod critiques an artists sample page.

    86 Rough TalkComments and opinions from our readers.

    For more art by our featured artists, visit www.bobmcleod.com/roughstuff.htm

    ISSN 1931-9231

  • OCTOBER 2006 ROUGH STUFF 3

    BRIAN APTHORPBrian Apthorp is

    part of the new van-

    guard working incomic books toda

    y, but

    hes very well rooted in the fundam

    entals

    of good comic art. His composition

    s are

    dynamic, his figures are graceful

    and powerful andsexy,

    and his dramaticlighting is first-r

    ate, delighting the inker

    in me. His pencils would be a ball

    to ink!

    F E A TU R E D

    A R T IS T

    BRIAN APTHORP:

    Ghost #11, cover

    The pencils for the cover of Ghost #11. I did

    four covers, for numbers 9, 11, 13 and 17, and

    this is one of the better ones, I think, though

    shes considerably sexier in the other three.

    But it was really cool, working on each,

    because I didnt have to adhere to any story

    situation; they were simply compositions of

    my own devising, portraits of her and her

    peculiar situation, trying to be evocative.

    ABOVE: The cover for Ghost #11, inked by

    Gary Martin.

    GHOST TM & 2006 Dark Horse Comics.

  • 4 ROUGH STUFF OCTOBER 2006

    BRIAN

    APTH

    ORP

    BRIAN APTHORP:

    Dreaming Special:

    Trial and Error, pg. 28

    This is from The

    Dreaming Special:

    Trial and Error, writ-

    ten by LenWein, for

    Vertigo from some-

    time in the late 90s.

    It was inked by Scott

    Hampton, one of my

    favorite artists and

    persons, and I am

    proud of it, basically.

    Another of those

    phantasmagoria

    pages, looking like

    Victorian wallpaper,

    I supposebut it

    was depicting the

    magic world of the

    Dreaming, and

    again, the ol

    reliance on the

    colorist to separate

    a bit, down the line.

    DREAMING TM &

    2006 DC Comics/

    Vertigo

  • OCTOBER 2006 ROUGH STUFF 5

    BRIAN APTHORP:

    Dreaming Special:

    Trial and Error, pg. 18

    The background was

    filled in on computer

    just to give a sense

    of how the thing was

    designed-for. The

    light amount of

    blacks on the figures,

    relatively, deemed it

    necessary to pull

    them out of the black

    emptiness of the

    courtroom back-

    ground. But I sent

    Scott Hampton some

    marker studies,

    saying how it was

    difficult for me to

    push the blacks as

    far as I wished, to

    encourage him to

    help get me there

    in his masterful inks.

    And what a drafts-

    man! Nobody ever

    inked my stuff with

    such sensitive

    drawing fidelity, and

    of course, he

    improved a lot of

    things in the bargain.

    I loved working in

    this dark environ-

    ment, of my own

    choosing, actually.

    It was just hard to let

    go of reflected light

    and all that. Its a

    struggle for me.

    DREAMING TM &

    2006 DC Comics/

    Vertigo

  • FRANK BRUNNERFrank Brunner h

    as always been one of

    my favorite artists. His work is ve

    ry

    sensual, and hisimagination know

    s no

    bounds. Hes probably best known

    for

    his definitive efforts on DR. STRAN

    GE and HOWARDTHE

    DUCK. In recentyears, hes been

    doing a lot of amazing

    commission work.

    F E A TU R E D

    A R T IS T

    14 ROUGH STUFF OCTOBER 2006

    FRANK BRUNNER:

    Supergirl pin-up:

    Just a bit naughty,

    but still mostly

    nice!

    SUPERGIRL TM &

    2006 DC Comics

    DR. STRANGE TM & 2006 MarvelCharacters, Inc.

  • OCTOBER 2006 ROUGH STUFF 15

    FRAN

    KBRU

    NNER

    FRANK BRUNNER:

    Howard the Duck

    (in Baghdad).

    Like Hope and

    Crosby, Howard

    and Beverly do a

    road trip movie

    in Ole Baghdad.

    HOWARD THE

    DUCK TM &

    2006 Marvel

    Characters, Inc.

  • 16 ROUGH STUFF OCTOBER 2006

    FRANK BRUNNER:

    Howard The Duck #1,

    page 6

    Howard executes a

    very difficult rescue.

    HOWARD THE DUCK

    TM & 2006 Marvel

    Characters, Inc.

    FRAN

    KBRU

    NNER

  • 26 ROUGH STUFF OCTOBER 2006

    COVER STORIES

    W hat happens between the initial layout of a cover, and the finished, printed piece? Usually a lot ofchangessome brought about by the pencil artist, some by the inker (assuming theyre not thesame person as the penciler), and some at the request of an editor or publisher. We asked acouple of this issues pros to give us a little insight into these classic covers.PAUL GULACY:

    Catwoman #25 cover

    rough: When Dan

    Didio asked me on

    board as the new

    penciler on

    Catwoman, I decided

    to pick an important

    scene from Ed

    Brubakers script,

    which had her

    crashing through the

    boarded-up window

    of a crack house in

    that first issue that I

    drew. It just

    screamed grand

    entrance. I decided

    on an upshot of her,

    but I needed a photo

    reference in this

    particular case,

    which meant I

    needed a model.

    CATWOMAN TM &

    2006 DC Comics

  • OCTOBER 2006 ROUGH STUFF 27

    PAUL GULACY:

    I nixed the opaque projector and

    rendered the scene freehand in

    pencil while holding a photo still.

    Jimmy Palmiotti then did his usual

    inking magic (below). In a situation

    of a monthly book with tight dead-

    lines, I felt he and I as a team

    worked great together. The only

    thing I didnt like about this was the

    goggles. I was adhering to the

    design the former team used which,

    according to Ed, was based largely

    on the same worn by Joe Kuberts

    Enemy Ace character. If it were up

    to me, Id nix them altogether. If she

    can run, jump, leap and do every-

    thing as a cat, why cant she see at

    night like one? Im for seeing Selina

    Kyles gorgeous eyes.

    CATWOMAN TM & 2006 DC

    Comics

  • 30 ROUGH STUFF OCTOBER 2006

    INTERVIEW

    PAUL GULACYBy Michael Kronenberg

    F or over thirty years Paul Gulacy has continued to be a creative force in the comic book industry. Hehas worked for every major publisher and has been associated with some of comics most memo-rable characters and titles. To thrive as long as he has in an industry as grueling and sometimescruel as comics has been not only his ability as an artist and storyteller, but tantamount to his skills as a survivor.

    Numerous times over the years a Gulacy art job would hang on the balance of which inker was selected for his

    pencils. There have been some outstanding embellishers he has been partnered withDan Adkins, Terry Austin, and

    Jimmy Palmiotti to name a fewbut too many times he has been mismatched and his idiosyncratic style has been lost.

    With the release this month of Jonah Hex #12, Gulacy embarks on a new venture with his art: inking his pencils.

    you never saw me doing my owncovers when I was on Master of Kung Fu,because I just got under the wire on thedeadline and there was no time to let medo the cover. Knowing that, I decided tomake the slash page the cover.

    I never get tired of it. Its what I do. Itsmy outlet for self-expression. Mar