Research Article Iraqi Community Pharmacy ?· Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 47(1), November - December…

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  • Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 47(1), November - December 2017; Article No. 07, Pages: 45-51 ISSN 0976 044X

    International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research . International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

    .

    . Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    45

    Dena Al-Tameemi*1, Haydar Al-Tukmagi2 1Ministry of Health, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq.

    *Corresponding authors E-mail: dena.abbas@yahoo.com

    Received: 09-09-2017; Revised: 14-10-2017; Accepted: 26-10-2017.

    ABSTRACT

    Dyslipidemia is an ideal area to demonstrate the value that pharmacists can add to the patient care process through services that can increase patient compliance while improving treatment outcomes and patients quality of life. The aim of this study is to apply a pharmaceutical care program for patients with dyslipidemia within a community pharmacy setting and examine its effects on patients awareness about dyslipidemia, disease control, and quality of life. A randomized, controlled, prospective clinical trial with treatment and follow up periods of 16 weeks. 57 patients who were aged 18 years or older were assigned randomly either to control group (receive usual care) or intervention group (receive pharmaceutical care). Patients were interviewed on a monthly basis where lipid profile was measured. Patients knowledge about the illness and quality of life were assessed. In the intervention group, the knowledge about dyslipidemia score was increased from 9.682.64 to 12.01.87 which was statistically significant (p

  • Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 47(1), November - December 2017; Article No. 07, Pages: 45-51 ISSN 0976 044X

    International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research . International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

    .

    . Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    46

    targets in addition to reducing adverse drug events.18 These intermediate health outcome benefits result from enhanced patient knowledge about medications, increased medication adherence, and improved quality of life.

    18

    METHODS

    A randomized, controlled, prospective clinical trial with a follow-up period of 16 weeks was carried out at a community pharmacy in Baghdad city, Iraq where 76 patients were included. The inclusion criteria for patients were as follows: both genders, age of 18 years or older, had already been diagnosed and treated for dyslipidemia and who had expressed willingness to abide by the rules of study and provided a written informed consent. While pregnant women, patients with: communication difficulties, nephrotic syndrome, hypersensitivity to any lipid-lowering agent or those who would not be in the geographic area of the study for the entire duration of the study were excluded from participation in our trial.

    The Patients engaged in our trial were randomly assigned to either a control or an intervention group. The intervention group received comprehensive pharmaceutical care program while the control group received ordinary (usual counseling) care.

    Initial assessment data for both groups were collected through personal interviews and include details about patients` sociodemographics, history of the present illness, information on medications being used, comorbidities and life style habits in addition to measurement of patient`s weight and height to calculate Body Mass Index (BMI). For laboratory analysis, patients had been asked to fast for 10-12 hours in order to measure lipid profile (Total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, VLDL, and Triglycerides). Heart Risk Calculator available at http://www.cvriskcalculator.com/was used to estimate10-year risk of heart disease or stroke using the ASCVD algorithm to determine the potency of statin agent needed for each patient. Questionnaires to assess Patients` knowledge about dyslipidemia and quality of life were used at the first and the last session.

    Pharmacist intervention

    Patients in both groups were surveyed for 16 weeks during this time period participants attended monthly sessions at the pharmacy, for control group these sessions were of usual care where only laboratory tests were performed to measure lipid profile. This usual care was offered with little or no education of the patients on their diseases and treatment and without empowerment of the patients to be fully involved in the self-management of their illnesses, whereas patients in the intervention group attended a monthly visit that lasted about 15 minutes each and additional on-demand phone calls and visits were performed if required by the patients . A stepwise approach was designed for each patient in order to: set priorities for patient care, assess patients educational needs, and develop a comprehensive and

    achievable pharmaceutical care plan. Patients in the intervention group were also educated on their illness and their medication in a structured manner, including information about dyslipidemia, discussions about therisk of its complications, role of therapy in disease management and treatment goals. Behavioral modifications which involved advice on the following were pursued: Physical exercise, diet, Smoking cessation. Patients were supplied with this information verbally and in a written manner through manuals organized specially for this study. At each visit: lipid profile and body weight were measured for each patient in the intervention group.

    Final measurements and assessments

    At the last scheduled visit, patients in both groups received questionnaires to assess their knowledge about dyslipidemia and quality of life. Weight measurement and blood analysis for lipid profile determination were also performed.

    Statistical analysis

    SPSS 20.0.0, Minitab 17.1.0, GraphPad Prism 7.0 software package used to make the statistical analysis, p value considered when appropriate to be significant if less than 0.05.

    RESULTS

    57 patients completed the follow-up period, 29 patients in the control group and 28 in the intervention group; the mean age was (58.9 9.8). Patients characteristics and details are summarized in Table 1.

    Disease characteristics including disease duration, lipid profile and ASCVD scores were assessed for both groups at baseline. The results show that there were significant differences (P value < 0.05) in TC, TG and VLDL values between the groups and the values of these parameters were higher in the intervention group, whereas no significant differences were noticed for the other parameters as shown in Table 2.

    At the beginning of the study, there was no significant difference in total knowledge scores. Total scores were (9.68 2.64), (9.48 2.49) in the intervention and the control group respectively. At the end of study, the mean scores were increased significantly in the intervention group and became (12.00 1.87). At the end of the follow-up period, the control group showed no significant difference in total score and in the individual components except in general knowledge which was improved from (0.79 0.77) at baseline to (1.21 0.49) at the end and the change was statistically significant. Table 3 and 4 demonstrate patients scores regarding different aspects of the disease as well as the total score values.

    Quality of life was assessed using short form-36 questionnaire (SF-36), and the data obtained are shown in Table.5. It was obvious that the application of our pharmaceutical care program on the intervention group

    http://www.cvriskcalculator.com/http://www.cvriskcalculator.com/

  • Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 47(1), November - December 2017; Article No. 07, Pages: 45-51 ISSN 0976 044X

    International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research . International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

    .

    . Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net

    47

    had improved their mean scores from (50.07 17.38) at baseline to (55.51 17.52) at the end which was statistically significant within the group, however this improvement was not statistically significant when compared to that of the control group (P value > 0.05). The percentage increase in mean quality of life score values at the end of the study was 17.7% in the intervention group vs. 4.5% in the control group as illustrated in Figure 1.

    The impact of pharmaceutical care program on different clinical parameters was summarized in Table 6. At baseline, there were significant differences between the groups in the following parameters: total cholesterol, TG and VLDL so adjusted analysis was used to eliminate such confounders. At the end of the study, P of interaction which assessed changes between the 2 groups revealed that all the assessed parameters were significantly improved in the intervention group except HDL values

    where no significant difference between the groups was obtained (P value > 0.05). On the other hand,

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