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  • Radio mode AGN feedback observations in massive central galaxies

    1 Becky Canning, Heidelberg, July 2014

  • Multiphase media in X-ray bright galaxies

    2

    Low redshift, X-ray bright, massive (central) galaxies !

    Masses ~1011-1012 solar masses Single SSP models suggest ages of ~ 10 billion years SFRs typically

  • Multiphase media in X-ray bright galaxies

    3

    Low redshift, X-ray bright, massive (central) galaxies !

    Masses ~1011-1012 solar masses Single SSP models suggest ages of ~ 10 billion years SFRs typically

  • Multiphase media in X-ray bright galaxies

    4

    Low redshift, X-ray bright, massive (central) galaxies !

    Masses ~1011-1012 solar masses Single SSP models suggest ages of ~ 10 billion years SFRs typically

  • 5

    Abell 3581!z=0.0218 (95 Mpc)

    Canning et al. 2013

    Combine: HST optical/UV JVLA and GMRT radio data

    Chandra X-ray data SOAR optical imaging VIMOS spectroscopy

  • 6

    Cool-core group - some heating is required!

    Chandra X-ray

    50 ~ 20 kpc

  • 7

    LX in the core ~ Pcav in inner bubbles!2.1x1042 ergs-1 ~ 2.2x1042 ergs-1

    Chandra X-rayJVLA 1.4 GHz

    See also Birzan+04, Rafferty+06+08, Dunn+F,06,07

    Duty cycle is ~100%

    Multiple bubbles - AGN timescalesDuty cycles - high (70% to 100%)

    Birzan et al. 2004, Rafferty et al. 2006!Dunn et al. 2006

  • 8

    AGN feedback in Abell 3581 5

    Figure 2. Left: Net narrow band H emission image, taken with the SOAR telescope, of the BGG in Abell 3581 after removal of continuum emission with theCTIO 6520/76 filter. Right: The unsharp masked H emission image. The initial image has been smoothed by a 2D gaussian with = 1 arcsec, subtractedfrom the original and binned by 4 pixels (0.6) in each direction.

    Figure 3. Left: HST F555W image with a smooth elliptical isophotal model subtracted. The dark feature piercing north-south through the nucleus and turningtowards the south-east is absorption from a prominent dust lane. Right: F300X image of the same region. The red circle shows a young star cluster not seenin the visible (F555W and F814W) images. The star cluster coincides with the northern dust lane.

    Figure 4. Left: The central region of the net H image overlaid with contours of dust absorption. The dust closely coincides with the inner H filaments.Right: The relative dust attenuation in the brightest cluster galaxy in units of E(B V ) magnitudes after correction for Galactic reddening. Contours ofL-band JVLA radio emission, which fill the inner X-ray cavities, are overlaid. The angular scale is the same as the left hand panel.

    c 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000000

    AGN feedback in Abell 3581 5

    Figure 2. Left: Net narrow band H emission image, taken with the SOAR telescope, of the BGG in Abell 3581 after removal of continuum emission with theCTIO 6520/76 filter. Right: The unsharp masked H emission image. The initial image has been smoothed by a 2D gaussian with = 1 arcsec, subtractedfrom the original and binned by 4 pixels (0.6) in each direction.

    Figure 3. Left: HST F555W image with a smooth elliptical isophotal model subtracted. The dark feature piercing north-south through the nucleus and turningtowards the south-east is absorption from a prominent dust lane. Right: F300X image of the same region. The red circle shows a young star cluster not seenin the visible (F555W and F814W) images. The star cluster coincides with the northern dust lane.

    Figure 4. Left: The central region of the net H image overlaid with contours of dust absorption. The dust closely coincides with the inner H filaments.Right: The relative dust attenuation in the brightest cluster galaxy in units of E(B V ) magnitudes after correction for Galactic reddening. Contours ofL-band JVLA radio emission, which fill the inner X-ray cavities, are overlaid. The angular scale is the same as the left hand panel.

    c 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000000

    ~108 solar masses of gas ~106 solar masses of dust

    H alpha

    Dust

  • How can radio mode feedback affect galaxy evolution

    Quiescence: Keeping hot gas hot !

    9

    But cool and cold gas are observed in massive X-ray bright galaxies.

    !Argue here that this gas originates from the hot gas

    and is heated/redistributed in the galaxy by RM AGN feedback. So RM feedback also important for quenching

    (preventing cool/cold gas from forming stars).

  • 10JVLA 1.4 GHz

  • 11

    GMRT 600 MHzJVLA 1.4 GHz

  • 12

    GMRT 600 MHzJVLA 1.4 GHz

    H alpha

  • 13Chandra X-rayJVLA 1.4 GHz

    H alpha

  • Velocities in the cool gas

    14

    Cool gas encases inner bubbles

    !Smooth line-of-sight

    velocities

    Canning et al. 2013

  • Velocities in the cool gas

    15

    High velocities observed near base of bubble

    !AGN bubbles (and maybe jet) displacing and redistributing

    the cool and cold gas !

    No SF observed in filaments ~0.2 solar masses

    per year in core

    Canning et al. 2013

  • Velocities in the cool gas

    16

    High velocities observed near base of bubble

    !AGN bubbles (and maybe jet) displacing and redistributing

    the cool and cold gas !

    No SF observed ~0.2 solar masses per year

    Canning et al. 2013

    A1835 CO(1-0): Molecular flow

    Lack of high velocity gas towards nucleus

    Early science ALMA results show outflow of

    ~600 km s-1 in very cold gas

    McNamara et al. 2013, Russell et al. 2013

  • 17

  • H alpha emission (6/8)

    18

    2296 N. Werner et al.

    Figure 1. H+[N II] images of the galaxies with extended emission-line nebulae in our sample obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope.

    Table 4. H+[N II] fluxes from theSOAR telescope.

    Galaxy fH+[NII](1013 erg s1 cm2)

    NGC 1399

  • 2296 N. Werner et al.

    Figure 1. H+[N II] images of the galaxies with extended emission-line nebulae in our sample obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope.

    Table 4. H+[N II] fluxes from theSOAR telescope.

    Galaxy fH+[NII](1013 erg s1 cm2)

    NGC 1399

  • NGC 4636

    Pressure

    0.5 kpc

    5E-05 0.00015 0.00025

    Cold gas in giant ellipticals 2299

    Figure 5. Same as Fig. 4, but for NGC 6868 and NGC 7049.

    Figure 6. 2D map of the hot gas pressure (in units of keV cm3( l20 kpc )1/2) and entropy (in units of keV cm2 ( l20 kpc )

    1/3) with the H+[N II] contoursoverlaid. The maps were obtained by fitting each region independently with a single temperature thermal model, yielding 1 fractional uncertainties of35 per cent in temperature, entropy and pressure. Point sources were excluded from the spectral analysis and therefore appear as white circles on the maps.

    Fabian 2007; Sanders et al. 2008, 2010; Sanders, Fabian & Taylor2009; de Plaa et al. 2010; Werner et al. 2011, 2010, 2013) indicatesthe presence of cooling hot plasma distributed between the threads.The hot plasma may be cooling both radiatively and by mixing withthe cold gas in the filaments. Part of the soft X-ray emission from

    this cooling plasma gets absorbed by the cold gas in the strands(Werner et al. 2013).

    The velocities inferred from the [C II] line emission are consistentwith those measured from the H+[N II] lines by Caon, Macchetto& Pastoriza (2000), indicating that the different observed gas phases

    MNRAS 439, 22912306 (2014)

    by guest on June 28, 2014http://m

    nras.oxfordjournals.org/D

    ownloaded from

    NGC 4636

    Pressure

    0.5 kpc

    5E-05 0.00015 0.00025

    Cold gas in giant ellipticals 2299

    Figure 5. Same as Fig. 4, but for NGC 6868 and NGC 7049.

    Figure 6. 2D map of the hot gas pressure (in units of keV cm3( l20 kpc )1/2) and entropy (in units of keV cm2 ( l20 kpc )

    1/3) with the H+[N II] contoursoverlaid. The maps were obtained by fitting each region independently with a single temperature thermal model, yielding 1 fractional uncertainties of35 per cent in temperature, entropy and pressure. Point sources were excluded from the spectral analysis and therefore appear as white circles on the maps.

    Fabian 2007; Sanders et al. 2008, 2010; Sanders, Fabian & Taylor2009; de Plaa et al. 2010; Werner et al. 2011, 2010, 2013) indicatesthe presence of cooling hot plasma distributed between the threads.The hot plasma may be cooling both radiatively and by mixing withthe cold gas in the filaments. Part of the soft X-ray emission from

    this cooling plasma gets absorbed by the cold gas in the strands(Werner et al. 2013).

    The velocities inferred from the [C II] line emission are consistentwith those measured from the H+[N II] lines by Caon, Macchetto& Pastoriza (2000), indicating that the different observed gas phases

    MNRAS 439, 22912306 (2014)

    by guest on June 28, 2014http://m

    nras.oxfordjournals.org/D

    ownloaded from

    2 kpcNGC 5846

    Pressure

    0.0008 0.0012 0.0016 0.002 0.0024

    X-ray pressure

    20

    Cold gas in giant ellipticals 2299

    Figure 5. Same as Fig. 4, but for NGC 6868 and NGC 7049.

    Figure 6. 2D map of the hot gas pressure (in units of keV cm3( l20 kpc )1/2) and entropy (in units of keV cm2 ( l20 kpc )

    1/3) with the H+[N II] contoursoverlaid. The maps were obtained by fitting each region independently with a single temperature thermal model, yielding 1 fractional uncertainties of35 per cent in temperature, entropy and pressure. Point sources were excluded from the spectral analysis and therefore appear as white circles on the maps.

    Fabian 2007; Sanders et al. 2008, 2010; Sanders, Fabian & Taylor2009; de Plaa et al. 2010; Werner et al.

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