radio key facts 2002

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1. Radio 2002 2nd Edition November 2002 2. ForewordThe International Key Facts Radio 2002 analyses the Formats have been reduced to main families in order tosituation of radio in 22 European countries plus the United give indication of the main target group of a radio station,States which can be used as benchmarking. The figures they do not intend to give a strict definition of the sta-presented are those that are recognised and used by the tions play-lists.professionals of each country. This does not, however, Although by no means exhaustive, the unique gatheringenable a direct cross comparison of the data to be made. of those sometime heterogeneous information intends toThe definitions used in each country vary quite consid- give to the reader a glimpse of the diversity and power oferably. The audience measurement, for instance, is pretty radio in Europe.different from a country to another: the population of the In order to register scale, the financial indicators havesample may vary from 9 year-olds and plus to the 15 year- been converted into at constant value. Those used forolds and plus. In some other countries, people over 75 or this issue are for January 1st 2002.79 are not part of the sample. 1st January 2002 Country Currency abbreviation 1 equals Czech republic CZK 32.11232 Denmark DKK 7.42858 Hungary HUF 244.687 Norway NOK 7.97286 Poland PLZ 3.5406 Romania ROL 27198.1 Slovakia SKK 42.7163 Sweden SEK 9.3088 Switzerland CHF 1.4779 UK GBP 0.6121 USA USD 0.891392 Radio 2002 3. Editorial After a century of existence, radio is still a youthful medium, with enormous growth potential. Firstly, though radio has yet to go through its own digital revolution, 25 years after the FM revolu- tion, with the advent of increasingly available advances in technology, it is nevertheless definitely moving forward. Several countries (mainly the UK and Northern European countries) have made firm steps in the Digital audio broadcasting field. But technology is not only about terrestrial broad- casting. It opens up new opportunities to increase radio consumption through alternative distrib- ution channels such as digital cable & satellite, Internet or the future mobile telephony applica- tions. This technology will free radio from the current scarcity of available frequencies and fuel new offers for listeners. Secondly, radio is far from having reached its definitive structure. In most European countries the liberalisation of the airwaves is rather recent. Private radio stations only began to appear as recently as the 80s or the 90s, most often on a local level. The strong link between radio and the local com- munities as well as varying national or even regional regulations in Europe explain why radio is a highly fragmented medium. The challenges posed by new technologies, the listeners demand for more professionalism and clear programming promises, the increase in competition between sta- tions, and finally, the need for a coherent and simple advertising offer are all factors that will most likely lead to progressive structural changes and to a certain degree of consolidation in several European markets. Radio is healthy enough to undergo these transformations. Listening is on the rise in Europe, thanks to more diversified and attractive programming formats. More than ever, radio proves itself to be adapted to the modern way of life, being as mobile as the new generation of Europeans. The increased share of out-of-home listening is a clear demon- stration of this phenomenon. Radio also benefits from improved financial resources. In most European markets, investment in radio advertising has grown constantly over the last few decades, growing more quickly than total advertising investments in nearly all other markets. The end of the century proved to be a very dynamic time for radio. One of the main reasons for this is a bet- ter advertising sales offer, and a new organisation of the media in many markets that convinces many traditional advertisers to use it. Secondly, a growing number of advertisers have turned their attention toward those elusive target groups that radio reaches so well, such as young adults, work- ing people and the upper classes. All of this combined with the broadcast medias effectiveness at quickly building consumer awareness, it is not surprising that radio rapidly became one of the favourite vehicles for the so-called New Technology sector. Of course, the 2001 economic slump has hit radio all over Europe. However, with its high degree of reactivity and its enhanced advertising attractiveness, radio is nevertheless well placed to weather the current downturn and profit from the rebound. Encouraging signs are already appearing in 2002 in several markets, notably in France, one of Europes largest radio markets. RTL Group, Europes leading broadcaster and content provider, together with IP, Europes leading advertising sales network, are proud to present the third edition of their International Key Facts - Radio report. The International Key Facts - Radio 2002 will provide you with a concise overview of the current radio markets in 22 European countries. It is a reference tool to help you better understand a media with strong local specificity, which has undergone profound changes over the last 20 years: a media that will continue to evolve and grow in the coming years with more sweeping changes ahead. We hope this publication will help you to enrich your knowledge of this exciting media. Didier LEFEVRE Head of IPs International Marketing CommitteeRadio 2002 3 4. 4 Radio 2002 5. Table of contents Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Radio in Europe, a young, traditional media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Western Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Austria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Belgium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Denmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Finland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 France . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Germany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Greece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Ireland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Italy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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