professor hoffmann - drawing room conjuring

Download Professor Hoffmann - Drawing Room Conjuring

Post on 06-Nov-2015

78 views

Category:

Documents

9 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

magic

TRANSCRIPT

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DRAWING-ROOMCONJURING

    TRANSLATED AND EDITED, WITH NOTES, BY

    PROFESSOR HOFFMANNAUTHOR OF "MODERN MAGIC," CONJURER DICK,"

    ETC., ETC.

    WITH 79 ILLUSTRATIONS

    LONDONGEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, LIMITED

    BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL MANCHESTER AND NEW YORK

    2

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.

    The following pages are a translation of a recent French work entitled "Recueil de Tours dePhysique Amusante," published by Delarue of Paris. They do not profess to form a completetreatise on the art of conjuring, but merely to describe, with the appropriate "boniment" or"patter," a selection of illusions which, by reason of the small amount and portable nature of theapparatus required for them, and their comparative independence of "stage" appliances, areespecially suitable for drawing-room performance.

    It is assumed that the reader possesses a certain amount of elementary knowledge, which isindicated, rather than actually conveyed, in the preliminary chapter. Where such knowledge iswanting, the student desirous of complete instruction will find it in the writer's work on "ModernMagic,"1 of which a sixth Edition has recently been issued, and to which references, whereappropriate, have been given. So far, however, as space has permitted I have endeavoured, byexplanatory footnotes, to render the text fully intelligible, without the necessity of recourse toany extraneous source of information.

    LOUIS HOFFMANN.January, 1887.

    1 George Routledge & Sons.

    4

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CONTENTS

    PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONSTHE FLYING COINTHE MONEY-PRODUCING CARDTHE MAGIC COINDEMATERIALISED MONEYTHE TWO HALF-CROWNSSOLUBLE MONEYTRANSPOSITION EXTRAORDINARY THE SHOWER OF MONEYA FINANCIAL OPERATIONTHE FLYING HALF-CROWNSMESMERIC SYMPATHYTHE AMBITIOUS CARDTHE TWO CARD-BOXESTHE PEREGRINATIONS OF A CARD AND A COINTHE RISING CARDS (IMPROVED)UNCONSCIOUS DIVINATION THE ELASTIC CARDS .AN IMPROMPTU TRANSFORMATION THE MYSTERIOUS LETTERA SUPERNATURAL MEMORY THE PENETRABLE HAT THE MYSTERIOUS SHOT THOUGHT CONTROLLED OR ANTICIPATED

    THE TEETOTUMWITH CARDS WITH DOMINOES WITH FLOWERS THE MYSTERIOUS ADDITION

    THE BURNT HANDKERCHIEFTHE SECRET SENTENCEFLORICULTURE EXTRAORDINARY THE FLYING BOTTLE AND GLASS THE BEWITCHED RINGA HUMAN HENTHE METAMORPHOSES OF A GLOVETHE JAPANESE BUTTERFLIESAN ILLUSTRATION OF FREE TRADE PRINCIPLESTHE THREE RINGS THE FAKIR'S WAND THE SPIRIT PADLOCK EXPERIMENTS OF A PSEUDO-SPIRITUALISTIC CHARACTER THE INTELLIGENT COINTHE DANCING DOLLS

    5

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    THE ABODE OF THE SPIRITSTHE KNOTTED POCKET-HANDKERCHIEFS THE HAT AND THE CHOSEN CARDTHE CARD FRAME AND THE HALF-CROWNTHE SPIRIT PADLOCKTHE TWO HATSTHE CORD FEATSPIRIT PHOTOGRAPHYA FEAT OF DIVINATIONCONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS

    6

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DRAWING-ROOM CONJURING,

    PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS.

    I SHALL pass very briefly over the elementary processes which form the A B C of sleight ofhand.

    In card tricks, the most important of the artifices employed is the "pass." There are severaldifferent ways of making the pass some with both hands, some with one only. The methodwhich is the least likely to be detected, and consequently the most generally used, is the two-handed pass, which is executed as follows:

    Take the pack in the left hand, and divide it, with the little finger, into two equal portions (seeFig. 1.) Cover the pack with the right hand, and nip the undermost portion endwise between thethumb and the remaining fingers of that hand (Fig. 2); then, by the aid of the little finger and ofthe second and third fingers of the left hand, draw the upper portion under the lower.

    There are several other methods of making the pass, but there is not much difference betweenthem. That known as the "Voisin" pass, however, after the name of its inventor,2 is unlike any ofthe others, and as it may occasionally be found useful, and is comparatively unknown, I will heredescribe it.

    Take the pack in the left hand, allowing its upper part to project beyond the hand for about halfits length (Fig. 3). With the middle finger of the same hand open the pack like a book, the closedportion resting on the fork of the thumb.

    2 A well-known manufacturer of magical apparatus. The "pass" in question is in truth merely theadaptation, to a single card, of the "false shuffle" known as the queue d'aronde, or dovetail.---TRANS.

    7

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    With the right hand, take the card to be introduced, and place it in the space formed by theopening of the pack, but holding it slant-wise (Fig. 4), then close the pack. With the forefinger ofthe right hand, press down the card as if merely to bring it square with the rest, but guiding it insuch manner as to make it project below the pack by about half its length.3

    Next, with the right hand, grip the remainder of the pack between the thumb and middle finger,and take it out of the left hand, though without removing it to any considerable distance. Thismanoeuvre will enable you to draw out with the left hand the introduced card. Replace the packin the left hand, slightly raising the card, which remains therein, in order to place it on the top.

    It is very important also to be able to "change" a card, i.e., to exchange a card, held by itself inthe right hand, for another which lies on the top of the pack held in the left hand, simultaneouslygetting rid of the "changed " card by placing it either upon or underneath the pack, ascircumstances may require (Fig. 5).

    The conjurer must also be well skilled in the art of "palming" a card4 (Fig. 6), not to mention"false shuffles," "replacing a palmed card," the "card drawn back," &c.5

    It is also absolutely necessary for the performer to be thoroughly versed in coin-palming, whichis performed as follows: Taking the coin with the tips of the fingers of the right hand, and(ostensibly) transferring it to the left hand, you secretly press it, under cover of that movement,into the palm of the right hand, between the ball of the thumb and the fleshy portion of thehand below the little finger.

    3 This is effected by keeping the card still diagonal to the rest of the pack, and pushing it down by the tipof the right forefinger on the left-hand top corner (which projects at the left side of the pack), until suchcorner has reached a position halfway down, when the card may be straightened with the rest. Its lowerhalf will now project below the rest, of the pack. TRANS.

    4 i.e., secretly retaining a card in the open or half-closed hand.-TRANS.5 "replacing a palmed card" explains itself, "False shuffles" retain the whole or a portion of the pack in apre-arranged order, though appaently the cards are thoroughly mixed. The "card drawn back" (i.e.showing the second card from the bottom in place of the bottom card) is a device now quite out of dateamong conjurers of any pretension to skill.TRANS.

    8

  • Drawing Room Conjuring-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There are several methods of "vanishing" a piece of money viz. "palming" as first described;the coulee, which is performed by sliding the coin with the thumb (in the act of apparentlytransferring it to the left hand) along the middle and ring fingers nearly to their tips, the coinbeing kept in position by the pressure of the first finger and little finger against its edges;6 the"Italian" palm, wherein the coin is held in the fork between the thumb and first finger; the tour-niquet or "French drop," wherein, holding a coin horizontally between the fingers and thumb ofthe left hand, you apparently take it with the right, but really let it drop into the palm of the lefthand; the pincette7 &c.; and lastly the "change" of one coin for another by means of palming orof the coulee.

    A proper "table" is desirable for a drawing-room performance; but if you are not provided withor cannot procure a table fitted with a servante,8 or with a drawer which may do duty as such,any ordinary table may be made available. All that is needful is to secure a tolerably high one,or, if need be, to increase its height by placing something underneath it, and to cover it with awoollen cloth, of which the side remote from the spectators is pinned up at each corner, so asto form a sort o f bag to receive articles which you may require secretly to get rid of.

    A very important point is the manner in which your tricks are presented to your auditors. In aword, your "patter" should be perfect. No special instructions can be given for this, but what yousay should have at least some show of reality, and above all must be lively. The smarter and thesimpler the better. Of course there are cases in which you will be compelled to spin out theperformance of a trick a little in order to allow your assistant (a totally different thing from a"confederate," by the way) to carry out some necessary arrangement. In such a case the operatormust display his utmost tact and intelligence, givi