Presentation by Nicolas Wallet 18 January 2011

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University Collaboration in Regional Development Spaces How universities can transform underperforming regional economies with the triple helix model. Presentation by Nicolas Wallet 18 January 2011. UNICREDS will study two key elements. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • University Collaboration in Regional Development Spaces

    How universities can transform underperforming regional economies with the triple helix model

    Presentation by Nicolas Wallet 18 January 2011

  • UNICREDS will study two key elements The triple helix (the partnership between the public and private sectors and education) as a good governance model which allows growth and employment The ways that a decentralised higher and further education system gathered in a partnership strengthens the synergistic effect of the triple helix.Partnership

  • End of traditional Universities- Sustainable Governance

  • Theorisation of the role of universities in regional innovation systems has evolved in the last 20 years, from the innovation systems approach, which highlighted the importance of knownledge spillovers from the educational and research activities performed by universities in regional knowledge spaces, towards the development of a third role performed by universities in animating regional economic and social development Gunasekara, C. 2006. Reframing the Role of Universities in the Development of Regional Innovation Systems. Journal of Technology Transfer, 31(1), pp. 101-113.Third European University-Business Forum by the EU Commission

  • New role of Higher and Further EducationUniversities as Producers of New KnowledgeUniversities as Educators of Advanced KnowledgeUniversities as Animators of Regions and Sectors Dalziel, P. Saunders, C. and Kaye-Blake, W. The role of Universities in Theories of Regional Development, in: Rowe, J. E., ed. 2009. Theories of local economic development:linking theory to practice. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd, pp.193-213.

  • Higher and Further Education can create new opportunities

    Universities, as major creators of scientific and technical knowledge, must be much deeper involved in the region they operate and develop a sense of awareness about and responsibility for contributing with real and novel solutions to real problemsespecially those ingrained at the bottom.Martins Rodriguez and Viedma Mart, Innovating through the lens of social entrepreneurship to tackle poverty reduction

  • Learning centre partnerships: Mutually reliant benefits

  • PartnershipsHigher and Further education institutionsFor StudentsBetter access to educationLife-long learningFor BusinessWorking with SMEsWorking with IndustryFor Public bodiesWorking for the economic development of the region

  • Regional development capacity? In this context, the role of local development approaches under Cohesion Policy should be reinforced, for example, by supporting active inclusion, fostering social innovation, developing innovation strategies or designing schemes for regeneration of deprived areas How can the partnership principle and involvement of local and regional stakeholders, social partners and civil society be improved? Higher and Further Education partnerships can help5th Cohesion reportEU Commission

  • Peripheral regions Convergence to excellence

  • 1- Cornwall Council Lead Partner2- Combined Universities in Cornwall15- University of the Highlands and Islands Millennium Institute3- Municipality of Skellefte - Campus Development Unit 4- Regional Council of Vsterbotten5- Akademi Norr Association of Municipalities6- City of Seinjoki7- University Consortium of Seinjoki / University of Tampere

    8- Frami9- University of South Bohemia10- South Bohemian Regional Authority11- Bulgarian Ministry of Regional Development and Public Works12- University of Sofia13- University of Debrecen Centre for Environmental Management and Policy14- Hajd-Bihar County Council

    University Collaboration in Regional Development SpacesEU economiccentre

  • Convergence regions 2007 2013Phasing-out convergence regions 2007 2013Regions non eligible to convergence 2007 2013

  • 20 Regions that have the most FP7 funds, representing 50% of the total FP7 funds so far

  • University and Economic Development: Knowledge Economy

  • Triple helix approach for economic developmentConclusions of the workshops on University-Business Cooperation with SMEs and Regional Development University has a key role in educating people but it also has a wider influence the development of territory by interaction with the industry. Therefore there is a need for a better understanding of the impact of the university on the territory through all of its outputs (education, workforce development, entrepreneurship, research etc). Each region can and should build on its own strength and build up the capacity in its local sectors: not every region can be silicon valley. Understanding the point of access for starting collaborations and how to develop sustained university-business partnerships. These partnerships are built on trust between the individuals involved. They have to include a continued and frequent contact between the partners.

  • Dialogue between HEIs and industry should be led in a mutually comprehensive language. Incentives: It important to find the right incentive for the right actor. For example - there is a need for incentives for universities to participate in SME business-university partnerships due to high transaction costs of collaborating with SMEs. Incentives are also important for achieving cultural change at an institution, but the change is not instant and usually takes a long time. The focus on societal value within the region: putting university- business cooperation in the context of a shared objective for the benefit of wider citizens Best use of public funding. There are many different sources of funding (ERDF, FP and national) which can be used in a complementary way to support common objectives in fostering university business collaboration and generating high added value.

  • Nurturing Business Culture and Research and Innovation Capacity

  • UNICREDS themesGeographical and community fit: design of a decentralised learning model to meet specific physical and social characteristics of failing regional economies in peripheral areas;Developing partnerships: universities with other FE/HE institutions, local learning centres and regional agencies working together in partnership in isolated, failing or resource-poor regions;Embedding economic and community benefits: embedding the benefits of collaborative universities within the local economy and communities;Nurturing innovation: nurturing an innovative business culture and reaching isolated groups;Achieving excellence: building research and innovation capacity within the region to secure long term sustainability.

  • Follow UNICREDSRegister for our newsletters on: www.unicreds.eu

  • Contact detailsNicolas WalletUNICREDS Project ManagerEconomic DevelopmentCornwall CouncilTrevenson House, PoolTR15 3RDT. +44 (0)1209 721071F. +44 (0)1209 711317E. nwallet@cornwall.gov.ukW. www.cornwall.gov.ukLinkedIn

    UNICREDS (University Collaborations in Regional Development Spaces[1]) is a European project that encourages participation in the knowledge economy via the triple helix concept. UNICREDS aims to demonstrate how the collaboration between universities, industry and the public sector can transform peripheral regions with underperforming economies into innovative knowledge economies.

    At the end of the project, UNICREDS will demonstrate that Universities, or Higher and Further Education institutions have a cardinal role in their local region to enthuse partnerships and then strengthen the local economy with an innovative knowledge economy. [1] See www.unicreds.eu UNICREDS study two key elements:- the triple helix (the partnership between the public and private sectors and education) as a good governance model which allows growth and employment

    - the ways that a decentralised higher and further education system gathered in a partnership strengthens the effect of the previous element.

    I will go through 5 points during this speech to describe how How universities can transform underperforming regional economies with the triple helix model.1. End of traditional Universities Sustainable GovernanceOne of the key challenges facing universities today is coming to terms with their changing role in society[1].Today a University is not simply an institution that provide education and research, Universities have to be understand in their regional economic environment, and then working alongside with business and public bodies.In this sense, we can say that the traditional university paradigm is not anymore.

    [1] Dalziel, P. Saunders, C. and Kaye-Blake, W. The role of Universities in Theories of Regional Development, in: Rowe, J. E., ed. 2009. Theories of local economic development:linking theory to practice. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd, pp.193-213.

    Universities can be seen as a huge, untapped resource, full of knowledge which could improve regional and national competitiveness, but isnt currently being fully exploited[1]. Here, in this excerpt of the Journal of Technology Transfer, Professor Gunasekara says that the role Universities evolved dramatically over the last 20 years, particularly in terms of the importance of knowledge transfer inside a regional space. Now the Universities have a new role in addition to the traditional education and research, in animating regional economic and social development.There is increasing pressure on universities not only to provide excellence in teaching and research, but also to take up a role in economic development and knowledge transfer.[2] European universities in particular are less well-placed to take up the opportunities offered by working with industry compared to those in the USA[3]. Higher and Further education institutions are indispensable to the economic development of a region when it comes to creating a flourishing, innovative and knowledge based economy. [1] Theorisation of the role of universities in regional innovation systems has evolved in the last 20 years, from the innovation systems approach, which highlighted the importance of knownledge spillovers from the educational and research activities performed by universities in regional knowledge spaces, towards the development of a third role performed by universities in animating regional economic and social development Gunasekara, C. 2006. Reframing the Role of Universities in the Development of Regional Innovation Systems. Journal of Technology Transfer, 31(1), pp. 101-113.[2] OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), 2010. Education at a glance 2010, Editorial by Angel Gurra, OECD Secretary-General, pp. 13-15[3] LERU (League of European Research Universities), 2006. Universities and Innovation: The Challenge for Europe, p.6The role of universities in economic development is threefold: firstly, Universities as Producers of New Knowledge; secondly, Universities as Educators of Advanced Knowledge; and finally, Universities as Animators of Regions and Sectors[1].

    Higher education institutions have an active role in economic development. This role needs to be influenced by the regional authority in order to be efficient. These interactions are encompassed in UNICREDS under the research of the triple helix model, and form the empirical test of the decentralised multi-university models.

    A common vision of the Higher and Further education institutions and the local public authority is therefore particularly important. This point highlights the importance of the conference organised by UNICREDS:Developing partnerships: universities with other FE/HE institutions, local learning centres and regional agencies working together in partnership in isolated, failing or resource-poor regions.UNICREDS wants to find out what are the good practices involved in the creation and process of these partnerships, to allow other regions who need it to implement it, with our policy recommendations.The core of the triple helix model is in the creation of partnerships, and the two key elements to initiate the triple helix are Universities, assisted by public authorities. [1] and [2] Dalziel, P. Saunders, C. and Kaye-Blake, W. The role of Universities in Theories of Regional Development, in: Rowe, J. E., ed. 2009. Theories of local economic development:linking theory to practice. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd, pp.193-213.Alongside the traditional knowledge transfer activities of research-centred universities the development of spin-off companies, patents, staff secondments and consultancy - universities are working with industry to develop courses which provide the local economy with employable graduates who can increase regional productivity. By talking to local companies, the university can develop courses that give students the skills that are needed on the job creating employable graduates and providing industry with the competence to move forward and to grow, generating additional jobs in the longer term. Research is also transformed through the connection with local businesses, as resources can be directed towards solving specific problems rather than simply to further academic knowledge. Universities can create opportunities in an economically depressed region[1].

    This last bit of the triple helix, the private sector, or the business, has to be proactively included in the partnership. This local awareness that Universities should develop has to be through a common language with business. Universities need to get to know the business of their environment. [1] MacLeod, G., McFarlane, B. and Davies, C. H., 1997. The knowledge Economy and the Social Economy: University Support for Community Entreprise Development as a Strategy for Economic Regeneration in Distressed Regions in Canada and Mexico. International Journal of Social Economics, 24(11), pp. 1302-1324.2. Learning centres partnerships: Mutually reliant benefitsThe supremacy of the classical university ivory tower is being challenged by higher and further education partnerships where several different higher and further education institutions work in partnership, pooling resources to reach new types of student and to develop collaborative research centres, and finding the critical financing mass to launch projects. This is particularly efficient for bidding for Convergence funding from the EU Commission.Higher and Further education partnerships facilitate economic development by providing accessible higher education to students who would find studying at a traditional university difficult. The blend of distance learning through internet classrooms or video conferencing alongside class-based activity makes these courses attractive to life-long learners and career changers as well as young people who are unable to meet the financial cost of living away from home to study full-time.The university is now expected to connect with an ever-widening circle of students, businesses and policy makers. In summary, instead of you going to university, now the university has to come to you.

    You may already have some sort of cooperation between each of these components, but what you need in order to lead forward your regional ec...

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