preparing students for pisa* prose that may be narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, or...

Download Preparing Students for PISA* prose that may be narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, or injunctive/instructive

Post on 28-Dec-2019

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • *Programme for International Student Assessment

    Preparing Students for PISA* Reading Literacy Teacher’s Handbook

  • 2 ■ Preparing Students for PISA* Reading Literacy

    Based almost entirely on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development document Sample Tasks from the PISA 2000 Assessment: Reading, Mathematics and Scientific Literacy © “OECD (2002). Reproduced by permission of the OECD.”

    Table of Contents

    Reading Unit 3 12 Question 11 ................................................13 Question 12 ................................................13

    Reading Unit 4 15 Question 13 ................................................16 Question 14 ................................................16 Question 15 ................................................17 Question 16 ................................................17

    Reading Unit 5 18 Question 17 ................................................20 Question 18 ................................................21 Question 19 ................................................21 Question 20 ................................................23 Question 21 ................................................23 Question 22 ................................................24 Question 23 ................................................24

    Reading Unit 6 26 Question 24 ................................................28 Question 25 ................................................28 Question 26 ................................................29 Question 27 ................................................30 Question 28 ................................................31

    Introduction 3 Preparing Atlantic Canadian Students

    for PISA......................................................3 PISA — Programme for

    International Student Assessment ............3 How PISA Works ................................................3 Significance of PISA ............................................3 Canadian Context ................................................3 Suggestions for Teachers ....................................4

    Reading Literacy ................................................4

    Atlantic Canada ELA Curriculum Outcomes........4 Outcome 4 ..........................................................5 Outcome 5 ..........................................................5 Outcome 6 ..........................................................5 Outcome 7 ..........................................................5

    How to Use This Document ....................................5

    Reading Unit 1 6 Question 1 ..........................................................7 Question 2 ..........................................................7 Question 3 ..........................................................8 Question 4 ..........................................................8 Question 5 ..........................................................8

    Reading Unit 2 9 Question 6 ........................................................10 Question 7 ........................................................10 Question 8..........................................................11 Question 9..........................................................11 Question 10........................................................11

  • Reading Literacy Preparing Students for PISA* ■ 3

    PISA — Programme for International Student Assessment

    PISA is a collaborative effort on the part of the member countries of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-op- eration and Development) to measure how well 15-year- olds are prepared to meet the challenges of today’s knowl- edge societies. Over 40 countries, including Canada, and more than a quarter of a million students participate in this international assessment that occurs every three years. PISA assesses three domains: reading literacy, mathe- matical literacy, and scientific literacy.

    How PISA Works A sample of 15-year-old students is randomly chosen from select- ed schools in each country for the PISA assessment. PISA is a two-hour pen-and-paper assessment with both mul- tiple-choice questions and questions requiring stu- dents to construct their own answers. Stu- dents and princi- pals also com- plete a ques- t i o n n a i r e . Each as- s e s s m e n t examines one domain in depth, and the other two domains provide a summary profile of skills. Reading literacy was examined in depth in 2000, mathematical literacy will be examined in depth in 2003, and scientific literacy will be examined in depth in 2006.

    Significance of PISA The internationally comparable evidence on student per- formance can assist jurisdictions to bring about im- provements in schooling to better prepare young peo- ple to enter a society of rapid change and global inter- dependence. As well, it can provide directions for poli- cy development, for curricular and instructional efforts, and for student learning. Coupled with appropriate in- centives, it can motivate students to learn better, teach- ers to teach better, and schools to be more effective.

    PISA represents an unprecedented effort to achieve comparability of results across countries,

    cultures, and languages.

    Canadian Context Approximately 30 000 15-

    year-old students from more than 1000 schools across Canada took part

    in the first adminis- tration of PISA in 2000. A large Canadian sam- ple was drawn so

    that information could be provided

    at both national and provincial lev-

    els. Cana- dian stu- d e n t s

    performed well in the global context, ranking second in reading, sixth in mathematics, and fifth in science. The perform- ance of the students in the Atlantic provinces was above the international average, but well below the Canadian average.

    Preparing Atlantic Canadian Students for PISA In preparation for the next PISA assessment, two documents have been prepared, one for teachers and anoth- er for students. In this document for teachers, there are two examples for whole-class discussion and two sam- ple tasks with answers and scoring criteria. In the companion document for students, the sample tasks are also provided but without answers and scoring criteria. These two documents are published to enable students, with the help of their teachers, to attain a clear understanding of the assessment and how it is scored and to help ensure more confident and successful participation. There is also a pamphlet for parents to raise awareness of the purpose, methodology, and significance of PISA.

    Introduction

  • 4 ■ Preparing Students for PISA* Reading Literacy

    Suggestions for teachers Reading Literacy

    Reading literacy is defined in PISA as “the understanding, using, and reflecting on writ- ten texts, in order to achieve one’s goals, to develop one’s knowledge and potential, and to participate in society.”

    Aspects of Reading The five aspects of reading assessed in PISA are as follows:

    1 Forming a broad general understanding (20%) — Student can identify the main idea, explain the purpose of the text, etc.

    2 Retrieving information (20%) — Student can select relevant information; this may require discrimination between two similar pieces of information.

    3 Developing an interpretation (30%) — Student can process information in a logical manner to show understanding of what is read.

    4 Reflecting on the content of text (15%) — Student can relate information found in a text to knowledge from other sources.

    5 Reflecting on the form of a text (15%) — Student can consider the text objectively and evaluate its quality and appropriateness.

    Text Format The text format used in PISA 2000 can be divided into two categories:

    1 Continuous text (approximately 66%) — includes prose that may be narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, or injunctive/instructive.

    2 Non-continuous text (approximately 33%) — includes charts and graphs, tables, diagrams, maps, forms, or advertisements.

    Reading Situations PISA distinguishes four types of reading situations:

    1 Reading for personal/private use (28%) — includes personal letters, fiction, reading for pleasure.

    2 Reading for public use (28%) — includes official documents, information about public events.

    3 Reading for work/occupational (16%) — reading related to the work world.

    4 Reading for education (28%) — includes school assignments, reading to learn.

    Type of reading task The “type of reading task” dimension is measured on three scales:

    1 retrieving information 2 interpreting text 3 reflection and evaluation

    Each question in the Reading Units in Sam- ple Tasks from PISA 2000 identifies the type of reading task, the text format, and the reading situation as they are described above.

    Atlantic Canada ELA Curriculum Outcomes The Atlantic Canada English Language Arts curricu- lum outcomes 4 to 7 reflect and support PISA’s defini- tion and its competencies. The general curriculum outcomes identify “what students are expected to know and be able to do upon completion of study in English Language Arts.”

    Language learning is a process that continues throughout schooling; therefore the identification of specific outcomes related to each assessment ques- tion is not feasible. However, the reading skills assessed by the Reading and Literacy component of PISA echo the learning expectations of the following Atlantic Canada English Language Arts curriculum outcomes.

  • Outcome 4: Students will be expected to select, read, and view with understanding a range of literature,