Power and Energy Advanced Design Applications Power and Energy © 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM  Center for

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  • Slide 1
  • Power and Energy Advanced Design Applications Power and Energy 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications Teacher Resource Unit / Lesson Learning Cycle One Learning Cycle One Introduction to Measurement and Energy
  • Slide 2
  • Measurements Measurements, in order to be precise, must have a standard, which ensures that all measurements are alike. A measurement standard is an exact quantity that people agree to use for comparison. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 3
  • Measurements - 1 Measurements must have units Units are what you use to measure the object our system has units such as feet, inches, and pounds. SI units SI stands for Le Systeme Internationale d'Unites The SI units are universally accepted and understood by scientists throughout the world. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 4
  • Measurements - 2 Prefixes in SI tell you what part of a base unit is represented milli 1/1,000 or 0.001 of a unit Ex. millimeter = 1/1,000 of a meter centi 1/100 or 0.01 of a unit Ex. centimeter = 1/100 of meter deci 1/10 or 0.1 of a unit Ex. decimeter = 1/10 of a meter deca 10 times a unit Ex. decameter = 10 meters 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 5
  • Measurements - 3 hecto 100 times a unit Ex. hectometer = 100 meters kilo 1,000 times a unit Ex. kilometer = 1,000 meters Derived units units obtained by combining different units, such as cm 3 and g/mm 3 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 6
  • Types of Measurements Types of measurements include length, volume, mass and density Length distance between two points Volume the amount of space an object takes up Mass all of the matter contained in a material Density mass per unit volume Temperature two temperatures; Celsius, used for most laboratory work and Kelvin, which is based on absolute zero which is the coldest temperature possible. 0 K is equal to -273 C. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 7
  • Engineering Notation
  • Slide 8
  • Slide 9
  • Measurement for Energy Unit for energy is a Joule 1 Joule = 1 newton-meter 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 10
  • Measurement for Power Power can also be measured in kilowatts. The watt is such a small amount of power that many times kilowatts are used instead. 1 kW = 1000 watts 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 11
  • Section 2 Types of Energy 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 12
  • What is Energy? Energy is the ability to produce change or to do work. Types of energy that we will learn about are: kinetic, potential, and total energy. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 13
  • Types of Energy The total energy in a substance or a system is the sum of the kinetic, potential and internal energies. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 14
  • Conservation of Energy The law of conservation of energy states that energy may change from one form to another, but the total amount of energy never changes. *1st Law of Thermodynamics* Example: swing or pendulum. As the swing moves back and forth the energy is continually converted from kinetic to potential energy. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 15
  • Kinetic Energy Kinetic energy is energy in the form of motion. The amount of kinetic energy depends on the mass of the object and its velocity. Formula: Kinetic Energy (KE) = mass ( m) x velocity2 (v2) Units: Mass = kg Velocity = m/s Energy = Joule (J) 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 16
  • Potential Energy Potential energy is energy stored in a motionless object due to its position or condition. Gravitational potential energy (GPE) is energy stored in objects that are in a position above the ground and having stored energy due to the force of gravity. An example would be a ball held suspended above ground. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 17
  • GPE Calculations The formula: Gravitation Potential Energy (GPE) is: GPE = mass (m) x 9.8 m/s2 x (h) Units: Mass = kilograms (kg) Gravity = meters/second2 (m/s2) Energy = Joules (J) 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 18
  • Section 3 Sources of Energy 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 19
  • Six Sources of Energy Nuclear * fission or fusion Electromagnetic *communication Chemical *batteries, coal Mechanical *speeding trains Thermal *heat engine, refrigerator Electrical *lightning 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 20
  • Six Types of Energy Sources Nuclear - Energy released when the nuclei of atoms are split or fused. Electromagnetic - Energy that travels through space in the form of waves. Chemical- Energy stored within the bonds between molecules. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 21
  • Six Types of Energy Sources Mechanical- Energy of motion Thermal- Energy of moving or vibrating molecules. Electrical- Energy generated by moving electrons. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 22
  • Section 4 Electric Motors and Generators 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 23
  • Electric Motor A device that changes electrical energy into mechanical energy. An electric motor contains an electromagnet that is free to rotate between two poles of a fixed permanent magnet. A - Power Source B Electromagnet C Permanent magnet 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 24
  • Generator Generator Generator does just the opposite of an electric motor. Changes mechanical energy into electrical energy. Uses electromagnetic induction by turning a coil of wire in a strong magnetic field. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 25
  • Section 5 Chemical Energy Battery 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 26
  • Chemical Energy Battery Combination of cells that provide chemical energy. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 27
  • Chemical Energy Battery PRIMARY CELLS VS. SECONDARY CELLS The basic difference is recharging ability. Primary cells - cannot be recharged after rated capacity is delivered. *must be discarded because the chemical reaction cannot be restored* Secondary cells or storage cell - the chemical reaction is reversible. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM Center for Teaching and Learning Advanced Design Applications
  • Slide 28
  • Chemical Energy Battery Carbon-Zinc Dry Cell Most common dry cell Operates at temperature of 70F. Higher temperatures will enable the cell to provide greater output. However, temperatures above 125F will cause rapid deterioration. Self-discharge of the cell when not in use reduces life (lower shelf life). Shelf life can be extended when stored at 40- 50F. But, the battery should be allowed to return to room temperature before use. 2014 International Technology and Engineering Educator