Perceptual dyslexia

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<ul><li> 1. Perceptual Dyslexia </li> <li> 2. DefinitionPerceptual Dyslexia is a visual-perceptual disorderaffecting reading and writing based activities such as:1.Reading 4. Math2.Writing 5. Copying3.Spelling 6. Reading music And other activities such as:1.Computer work 3. Sports performance2.Driving 4. Comfort under fluorescents </li> <li> 3. What Is Perceptual Dyslexia? Not standard dyslexia Perceptual vice optical Based on sensitivity to light frequencies, not optical dysfunction Victim can have 20/20 vision and still be affected </li> <li> 4. When ordinary readers look at text The way we see is not determined by what we want to see but how we have learned to practice seeing. There are several strategies that we pick between depending on what we have learned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes. So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey, a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architect uses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Each discipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic, you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 5. When dyslexics look at text The way we see is not determined by what we want to see but how we have learned to practice seeing. There are several strategies that we pick between depending on what we have learned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes. So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey, a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architect uses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Each discipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic, you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 6. Symptoms of Perceptual Dyslexia Light sensitivity Problems with high-gloss or high-contrast material Inefficient reading Slow reading rate Attention deficit Strain or fatigue Poor depth perception </li> <li> 7. The Victims of Perceptual Dyslexia Estimated 46-50% of those with learning disabilities or reading problems Estimated 33% of those with dyslexia, ADD/HD, or other behavioral problems Estimated 12-14% of the general population </li> <li> 8. Blurry Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 9. Halo Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 10. Rivers Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 11. Seasaw Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 12. Shaky Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 13. Swirl Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 14. Washout Effect What They See Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 15. What They SeeIrlen Syndrome w/Dyslexia Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 16. What They SeeOverlapping writing Reprinted by permission from Reading by the Colors by Helen Irlen </li> <li> 17. Discovery by IrlenSerendipitous discoveryA student using a red overlay noticed her page and words nolonger swayed back and forthRed did not work for everyoneTried overlays of other colors 31 out of 37 in class and 58 out of 75 in private practice helped by colored overlays Each individual helped had certain colors that made things better or worse </li> <li> 18. Effects of Perceptual Dyslexia Brains of perceptual dyslexics are in overdrive when working problems Signal in visual neural pathways of optic nerves of perceptual dyslexics is different </li> <li> 19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Dyslexics use different part of the brain for reading Dyslexics use larger portion of brains capacity in reading and visual tasks Normal Brain Dyslexic Brain </li> <li> 20. Looking for the Reason What Is the Cause of Perceptual Dyslexia? </li> <li> 21. Receptor Field Theory : Developed in 80s by visual physiologists Hypothesizes that cones of the eye organized into 8 sets of concentric, counterbalancing fields </li> <li> 22. Hypothesized Types of Receptor Fields </li> <li> 23. Receptor Field Theory Type of field determined by: Fields color region arrangement Balance of the output of each fields energy (signal) Positive or negative </li> <li> 24. Receptor Field Theory All receptor fields transmit their respective signal to brains visual processing center Signals summed to a unity, forming output image in brain </li> <li> 25. The way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading.The way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 26. Reading with a window-maskThe way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading.The way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 27. Reading with a window-maskThe way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading.The way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 28. Reading with a window-maskThe way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading.The way we see is not determined by what we want to see buthow we have learned to practice seeing. There are severalstrategies that we pick between depending on what we havelearned to see, and we switch between them as the task changes.So for example, a hunter uses a wide field of vision to locate prey,a scribe uses a narrow field to write and a painter or architectuses a variable field to arrange an ensemble into a whole. Eachdiscipline of seeing take practice. But suppose, like a dyslexic,you have a strategy inappropriate to reading. </li> <li> 29. How To Fix It Dim the lights Use natural vice fluorescent lighting Use blackboards instead of white boards Allow students to use colored paper Allow caps/visors to be worn indoors </li> <li> 30. Cont Computers Can be modified using display options of operating system Brighten or dim background Change background and font colors on computer screen Modification of light spectrum presented Colored film overlays Colored eyeglass filters Each persons color different </li> <li> 31. Testing for Color Irlen Method Two types of screening -Quick, simple test, consisting of about 10-15 questions -In-depth, reading-related screening (1-2 hours) </li> <li> 32. Wilkins Rate of Reading Test: Fairly simple, easy to administer Fairly quick diagnosis f...</li></ul>