PART FIVE Chapter 16: Renaissance - fin rev-0...Renaissance Covering the period from roughly 1400 to 1600, Renaissance means “rebirth”. It refers to the revival of interest in ancient Greek and Roman

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<ul><li><p>PART FIVE </p><p>Chapter 16: Renaissance </p><p>Key Styles for this chapter include: </p><p> Early Renaissance </p><p> High Renaissance </p><p> Northern Renaissance </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Key Terms for this chapter include: oil painting: sfumato and chiaroscuro </p><p> linear and atmospheric perspective </p><p> humanist </p><p> Plato and Neo-Platonism </p><p> art patron </p><p> Medici family </p><p> academy </p><p> Mannerism </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Renaissance </p><p>Covering the period from roughly </p><p>1400 to 1600, Renaissance means </p><p>rebirth. It refers to the revival of </p><p>interest in ancient Greek and Roman </p><p>culture. This interest is one of the key </p><p>characteristics of the period. </p><p> The new and very rich merchant class </p><p>joined nobility and clergy as art patrons. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Renaissance </p><p>Artists were learned persons whose creative powers were viewed as almost miraculous. They were considered a breed apart because of their abilities, and they transcended social class. </p><p> Painting, sculpture, and architecture were held as intellectual activities allied with mathematics, science, and poetry. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Renaissance </p><p>Influenced by the Greek philosopher Plato, beauty became equated with moral goodness. Renaissance artists sought an idealized beauty. </p><p> Humankind was viewed as Gods finest and most perfect creation. </p><p> Reason and creativity were considered Gods gifts. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Renaissance Artists worked to reproduce the natural world as accurately </p><p>as possible. </p><p> Studying the effects of light, they developed the technique of chiaroscuro. </p><p> Noting that distant objects appeared smaller than near ones, they developed the system of linear perspective. </p><p> Seeing how detail and color blurred with distance, they developed the principles of atmospheric perspective. </p><p> Artists studied anatomy, even dissecting cadavers, to fully understand the human form. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestions: </p><p>16.2 The Story of Jacob and Esau </p><p>16.3 Trinity with the Virgin, St. John the Evangelist, and Donors </p></li><li><p>Early Renaissance </p><p>The Early Renaissance is characterized by </p><p>the work of artists like Donatello, Ghiberti, </p><p>Masaccio and Botticelli. </p><p> Donatello: A sculptor; used the body as the </p><p>framework on which the fabric draped. </p><p> Sculptors created full-scale clay models of nude </p><p>figures, then draped clay-soaked linen over the clay </p><p>models to create garments. This model was then </p><p>copied in marble. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestion: </p><p>16.1 St. Mark </p></li><li><p>*St. Mark, Donatello, 1411-13, 79, marble. </p></li><li><p>Early Renaissance </p><p> Ghiberti: Designed the baptistry doors for </p><p>the Florence cathedral; his great </p><p>innovation was the use of architecture and </p><p>figures on the same scale in his work. </p><p> Masaccio: A painter; used the new </p><p>technique of linear perspective to create </p><p>deep, convincing architectural space within </p><p>his work; used a triangular composition </p><p>symbolic of the Godhead. 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Left Trinity with the Virgin, St John the Evangelist, &amp; Donors, </p><p>Massacio, fresco, 1425 </p><p>Right The Story of Jacob and Esau, Lorenzo Ghiberti, 1435 </p></li><li><p>Early Renaissance </p><p> Botticelli: A painter; worked for the Medici </p><p>family who commissioned secular artwork. </p><p> Medicis: A wealthy merchant class family who </p><p>were art patrons; they sponsored an Academy </p><p>(discussion group) where humanist scholars and </p><p>artists met to discuss Classical culture and its </p><p>relationship to Christianity. These two combined </p><p>systems of thought created a philosophy known </p><p>as Neo-Platonism. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestion: 16.6 The Birth of Venus </p></li><li><p>*The Birth of Venus, Botticelli, tempera, 1480 </p><p>Commissioned by Medici family who also sponsored an Academy. Venus (Roman </p><p>goddess of love and beauty) born from sea and is depicted on shell. Wind god Zephyr </p><p>blow her toward shore where figure (Spring) awaits to cloth her. Modeled after Greek </p><p>(Roman copy) Venus de Milo. In Neo-Platonic thought, Venus is associated with Mary. </p><p>Birth of water relates to baptism of Christ by John the Baptist. </p></li><li><p>High Renaissance </p><p>The High Renaissance lasted for about 25 </p><p>years ending around 1520. The most </p><p>outstanding and recognized artists of this </p><p>period are: </p><p>Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo </p><p> Other well-known artists include Raphael, Titian, </p><p>and Giorgione. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestions: </p><p>5.21 Study of Human Proportions </p><p>16.8 David </p></li><li><p>High Renaissance </p><p>Leonardo da Vinci </p><p> Embodies the term Renaissance man; many </p><p>consider him to have been the greatest genius </p><p>who ever lived. </p><p> A painter, inventor, sculptor, architect, engineer, </p><p>scientist, musician. </p><p> Left many works uncompleted. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Study of Human Proportions, Vitruvian </p><p>Man, da Vinci </p><p>http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&amp;source=images&amp;cd=&amp;cad=rja&amp;docid=j4f8GL_08l8_NM&amp;tbnid=k_o0w0hjX2OxOM:&amp;ved=0CAgQjRwwAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fmilan.milanovic.org%2Fmath%2Fenglish%2Fgold%2Fpages%2F06.Study%2520of%2520Human%2520Proportions%2520According%2520to%2520Vitruvious.html&amp;ei=iN1qUaixGKm5ygHV-4HAAw&amp;psig=AFQjCNGQ_30diV295ULfGiNkDpppsH7aNg&amp;ust=1366044424466082</p></li><li><p>High Renaissance </p><p>Leonardo da Vinci </p><p> The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper are </p><p>his most famous works. </p><p> Sfumato: Italian for smoke; Leonardos </p><p>specialty; a layering of translucent glazes </p><p>producing a hazy atmosphere, softened </p><p>contours, and velvet shadows. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestions: </p><p>2.4 Mona Lisa </p><p>4.45 Last Supper </p></li><li><p>*Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci, 1503-05 </p></li><li><p>Virgin and Saint Anne, Leonardo </p><p>da Vinci, Charcoal </p></li><li><p>*Madonna and Child with </p><p>Saint Anne, da Vinci, 1503-6 </p><p> Purpose to suggest theological </p><p>meaning . </p><p>3 form single unit </p><p>3 generations </p><p>Lamb- symbol of Jesus future </p><p>sacrifice </p><p>Tree symbolic of cross he will die on. </p><p>Sfumato- hazy atmosphere </p></li><li><p>*Last Supper, Leonardo da Vinci, </p></li><li><p>High Renaissance </p><p>Michelangelo </p><p> 25 years younger than Leonardo but his </p><p>greatest rival. </p><p> A painter, sculptor, poet, and architect. </p><p>The artist considered himself a sculptor </p><p>above all else. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestions: </p><p>16.10 Sistine Chapel </p><p>p.375 Portrait of Michelangelo </p></li><li><p>Portrait of Michelangelo </p></li><li><p>*Pieta, Michelangelo, 1500 </p><p>http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&amp;rct=j&amp;q=pieta&amp;source=images&amp;cd=&amp;cad=rja&amp;docid=zN-NoIzriXVF4M&amp;tbnid=yhHDgEoetA72gM:&amp;ved=0CAUQjRw&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Femployees.oneonta.edu%2Ffarberas%2Farth%2Farth110%2Farth110_sl8.html&amp;ei=YjRvUbiaNsfI2wX3koC4Bg&amp;bvm=bv.45368065,d.b2I&amp;psig=AFQjCNFH0GYTqSbC8NRXHdAf11hPQ_h2Hg&amp;ust=1366328666842901</p></li><li><p>*Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo, Vatican, 1473-80, </p><p>fresco </p></li><li><p> David, Michelangelo, </p><p>1501-4, Marble, 18 </p><p> Commissioned </p><p> Greeks knew how bodies </p><p>looked on outside. </p><p>Renaissance artists knew </p><p>how they looked on </p><p>inside. </p><p> Expressive face </p><p> Symbol of Florence </p></li><li><p>High Renaissance </p><p>Michelangelo </p><p> Tension and energy are characteristics that </p><p>make David a Renaissance sculpture. </p><p> The Sistine Chapel is another of his famous </p><p>works. It is a fresco and depicts stories, </p><p>prophets, and sybils from the Bibles Old </p><p>Testament. </p><p> He was the architect of the new St. Peters </p><p>Basilica in the Vatican. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>The Tempest, Giorgione, Oil on canvas, 1505. </p></li><li><p>*The Annunciation, Titian, 1560, </p><p>Oil </p></li><li><p>Northern Renaissance </p><p>The Northern Renaissance evolved out of </p><p>the Middle Ages. This artwork is </p><p>characterized by the artists interest in </p><p>details. </p><p> The Limbourg Brothers, Van Eyck, Grunewald, </p><p>Hans Holbein the Younger, and Durer are just a </p><p>few of the artists associated with this period. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestions: </p><p>16.16 February </p><p>16.20 The Ambassadors </p></li><li><p>*February, Limbourgh Brothers, 9, 1416 </p><p>The Ambassadors, Hans Holbein the Younger, Oil, 1533. </p></li><li><p>*Merode Altarpiece, Robert Campin, Oil, </p><p>1426 </p></li><li><p>Luke Drawing the Virgin, Rogier can der Weyden, 1435, Oil </p></li><li><p>Northern Renaissance </p><p>The artists interest in details stems from a </p><p>long tradition of decorative arts including </p><p>miniatures, manuscript illumination, </p><p>stained glass, and tapestries. </p><p> They were interested in the precise outer </p><p>appearance of their subjects. </p><p> Religious artwork tended to be emotionally </p><p>harsh. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>*Isenheim Altarpiece, Matthias </p><p>Grunewald, 1515. </p></li><li><p>*The Harvesters, Petier Brueghel the Elder, 1565, </p><p>oil. Netherland artist </p></li><li><p>Late Renaissance </p><p>Scholars generally date the end of the </p><p>High Renaissance in Italy to the death </p><p>of Raphael in 1520. It was followed by </p><p>a style called Mannerism. </p><p> Mannerism: Comes from the Italian </p><p>maniera, meaning style or stylishness. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p><p>Insert visual(s). </p><p>Suggestion: 16.24 The Last Supper </p></li><li><p>Late Renaissance: Mannerism </p><p> This artwork grew out of possibilities </p><p>suggested by the work of the High </p><p>Renaissance, especially Michelangelo. </p><p> Characterized by a fondness for elaborate </p><p>or obscure subject matter. </p><p> The artwork of Bronzino typifies the </p><p>Mannerist style. </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>*The Last Supper, Tintoretto, </p><p>1592-94, oil </p></li><li><p>Renaissance: SUMMARY </p><p>Key Styles and Terms covered: </p><p>Early, High, Northern Renaissance </p><p> oil painting: sfumato and chiaroscuro linear and atmospheric perspective humanist Plato and Neo-Platonism art patron Medici family Academy Mannerism </p><p> 2013, McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. </p></li><li><p>Compare and contrast the two paintings below. Discuss </p><p>periods and specific characteristics . </p></li></ul>

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