october 2012 biomass magazine

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October 2012 Biomass Magazine

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  • October 2012

    Determined To ProfitEvan Chrapko sold his fi rst company for $811

    million. Now hes ready to take large-scale biogas

    technology global.Page 22

    Plus:A Tennessee Town Buys in to Downdraft Gasifi cationPage 28

    And:Trends in Metal Recovery That Generate Signifi cant RevenuePage 34

    www.biomassmagazine.com

  • OCTOBER 2012 | BIOMASS MAGAZINE 3

    BIOGASBetting Big on BiogasBuilding the largest AD facility in North America isnt enough for Himark BioGas. The Canadian company has a global vision. By Luke Geiver

    POWERThe Upside of Downdraft Gasifi cationThis gravity-based technology combines feedstock fl exibility with a positive economic punch. Just ask the mayor of Covington, Tenn. By Luke Geiver

    ENERGY-FROM-WASTEMaximizing Metal Recovery Revenue streams linked to ferrous and nonferrous metal recovery technologies are on the rise, thanks to innovative hardware and advanced strategies. By Anna Simet

    SUSTAINABILITYVerifying Forest SustainabilityThere are several programs a business may choose from to prove that their woody feedstock was sustainably harvested.By Charles A. Levesque and Eric W. Kingsley

    INSIDE

    OCTOBER 2012 | VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 10

    FEATURES

    CONTRIBUTION

    DEPARTMENTS04 EDITORS NOTE

    On Not Wasting the Energy Potential in WasteBy Tim Portz

    06 INDUSTRY EVENTS

    07 POWER PLATFORMLegislation until Lame Duck Session: A Look AheadBy Bob Cleaves

    08 THERMAL DYNAMICSThe State of Biomass Heat: A 2012 Refl ection By Joseph Seymour and Charlie Niebling

    10 WASTE-HEAT NOTIONSA New FrontierBy Kelsey Southerland

    14 BUSINESS BRIEFS

    18 BIOMASS NEWS

    44 MARKETPLACE

    28

    22

    34

    40

    ADVERTISER INDEX

    2012 National Advanced Biofuels 46Conference & Expo

    2013 International Biomass Conference & Expo 4 & 12

    Airofl ex Equipment 30

    Algae Biomass Organization 47

    Amandus Kahl GmbH & Co. KG 26

    BBI Consulting Services 45

    Biomass Industry Directory 48

    Buhler Inc. 38

    Clariant Produckte (Deutchland) Gmbh 27

    Continental Biomass Industries, Inc. 14

    CPM Roskamp Champion 6

    CST Industries, Inc. 21

    Detroit Stoker Company 42

    Dieffenbacher 19

    Eide Bailly, LLP 37

    Factory Sales and Engineering Inc. 24

    Fagen Inc. 15

    Himark bioGas 2

    KEITH Manufacturing Company 31

    Metso Power AB 11

    PHG Energy 13

    PRODESA 5

    Renewable Energy World 16

    Retsch, Inc. 41

    RUD Chain 43

    Scheuch GmbH 20

    Schutte-Buffalo Hammer Mill 17

    Terex Woodsman Chippers 39

    ThermoEnergy Corporation 33

    Twin Ports Testing 36

    Vecoplan LLC 32

    West Salem Machinery 25

    Williams Crusher 9

    Wolf Material Handling Systems 18

    Biomass Magazine: (USPS No. 5336) October 2012, Vol. 6, Issue 10. Biomass Magazine is published monthly by BBI International. Principal Offi ce: 308 Second Ave. N., Suite 304, Grand Forks, ND 58203. Periodicals Postage Paid at Grand Forks, North Dakota and additional mailing offi ces. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Biomass Magazine/Subscriptions, 308 Second Ave. N., Suite 304, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58203.

    22

  • 4 BIOMASS MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2012

    On Not Wasting the Energy Potential in WasteBiomass-to-energy projects often fail to attract investors and debt partners because of their

    inability to demonstrate a reliable and consistent feedstock plan along with some assurance of long-term price stability. Coupled with the fact that large volumes of biomass feedstocks often found well away from major population centers, it becomes readily apparent why biomass-to-energy projects often struggle to move beyond the conceptual stage.

    Viewed in that context, municipal solid waste is a veritable dynamo as a feedstock. The U.S. EPA estimates that on average, every American generates nearly 4.5 pounds of waste each day. When it comes to waste, feedstock availability and populationand energy demand, by extensionare highly correlated. Waste also has a well-established, robust and effi cient collection system that is paid for by collection tipping fees.

    Why then, does the U.S. lag so far behind other parts of the world in waste to energy? The Inter-national Solid Waste Association reports that Europe boasts nearly fi ve times more waste-to-energy (WtE) facilities than the U.S. Perhaps the abundance of available land to dispose of waste plays a role. Waste professionals often talk of a mythical place known as away, a location that the public believes is the fi nal destination for its refuse. When attempts are made to retrieve this valuable feedstock from away and produce energy from it, however, public outcry often begins. Opponents of WtE facili-ties quickly hang the garbage burner label on a project and developers fi nd themselves forced into a public education role to keep their project moving forward.

    This months issue of Biomass Magazine is nothing if not a fi rm reminder that the WtE industry in this country continues to innovate and evolve in spite of the rampant misinformation that persists about its technologies and environmental footprint. Anna Simets feature Maximizing Metal Re-covery highlights the value delivered to WtE facilities and the general public through the continued advances made in front- and back-end metal recovery at these facilities. Luke Geivers feature on downdraft gasifi cation is not only a compelling technology feature, but also reinforces how WtE projects so often solve multiple problems simultaneously.

    Waste does not go away, nor should it. In all forms it carries energy, and because of its long list of advantages as a feedstock, developers will continue to eye it for conversion into power, thermal en-ergy and, increasingly, liquid fuels. While the general public can wring their hands, our industry knows that a refusal to capture energy from this ubiquitous feedstock would be an incredible waste.

    TIM PORTZVICE PRESIDENT OF CONTENT & EXECUTIVE EDITORtportz@bbiinternational.com

    EDITORS NOTE

    APRIL 8-10, 2013Minneapolis Convention Center

    Minneapolis, MNwww.biomassconference.com

    866-746-8385 | service@bbiinternational.com | twitter.com/biomassmagazine

    Networking Opportunities: Speak. Exhibit. Sponsor. Attend.

  • OCTOBER 2012 | BIOMASS MAGAZINE 5

    EDITORIAL

    PRESIDENT & EDITOR IN CHIEFTom Bryan tbryan@bbiinternational.com

    VICE PRESIDENT OF CONTENT & EXECUTIVE EDITORTim Portz tportz@bbiinternational.com

    CONTRIBUTIONS EDITORAnna Simet asimet@bbiinternational.com

    FEATURES EDITORLuke Geiver lgeiver@bbiinternational.com

    NEWS EDITORErin Voegele evoegele@bbiinternational.com

    COPY EDITOR Jan Tellmann jtellmann@bbiinternational.com

    ARTART DIRECTOR

    Jaci Satterlund jsatterlund@bbiinternational.com

    GRAPHIC DESIGNERElizabeth Burslie bburslie@bbiinternational.com

    PUBLISHING & SALESCHAIRMAN

    Mike Bryan mbryan@bbiinternational.com

    CEOJoe Bryan jbryan@bbiinternational.com

    VICE PRESIDENT, SALES & MARKETINGMatthew Spoor mspoor@bbiinternational.com

    EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT MANAGERHoward Brockhouse hbrockhouse@bbiinternational.com

    SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Jeremy Hanson jhanson@bbiinternational.com

    ACCOUNT MANAGERSMarty Steen msteen@bbiinternational.com Bob Brown bbrown@bbiinternational.com

    Andrea Anderson aanderson@bbiinternational.comDave Austin daustin@bbiinternational.com

    CIRCULATION MANAGER Jessica Beaudry jbeaudry@bbiinternational.com

    ADVERTISING COORDINATORMarla DeFoe mdefoe@bbiinternational.com

    SENIOR MARKETING MANAGERJohn Nelson jnelson@bbiinternational.com

    Subscriptions Biomass Magazine is free of charge to everyone with the exception of a shipping and handling charge of $49.95 for any country outside of the United States, Canada and Mexico. To subscribe, visit www.BiomassMagazine.com or you can send your mailing address and payment (checks made out to BBI International) to Biomass Magazine Subscriptions, 308 Second Ave. N., Suite 304, Grand Forks, ND 58203. You can also fax a subscription form to (701) 746-5367. Back Issues & Reprints Select back issues are available for $3.95 each, plus shipping. Article reprints are also available for a fee. For more information, contact us at (701) 746-8385 or service@bbiinternational.com. Advertising Biomass Magazine provides a specifi c topic delivered to a highly targeted audience. We are committed to editorial excellence and high-quality print production. To fi nd out more about Biomass Magazine advertising opportunities, please contact us at (701) 746-8385 or service@bbiinternational.com. Letters to the Editor We welcome letters to the editor. Send to Biomass Magazine Letters to the Contributions Editor, 308 2nd Ave. N., Suite 304, Grand Forks, ND 58203 or email to asimet@bbiinternational.com. Please include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity and/or space.

    TM

    Please recycle this magazine and remove inserts or samples before recycling COPYRIGHT 2012 by BBI International

  • 6 BIOMASS MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2012

    National Advanced Biofuels Conference & ExpoNovember 27-29, 2012Hilton Americas - HoustonHouston, TexasNext Generation Fuels and ChemicalsProduced by BBI International, the National Advanced Biofuels Conference & Expo is tailored for industry professionals engaged in producing, developing and deploying advanced biofuels, biobased platform chemicals, polymers and other renewable molecules that have the potential to meet or exceed the performance of petroleum-derived products. Early bird regist