new options and opportunities under the workforce innovation and opportunity act

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  • Slide 1
  • New Options and Opportunities Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act
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  • Slide 3
  • Workforce Investment Act Signed into law in 1998 Five Titles Title I. Workforce Investment Systems Title II. Adult Education and Literacy Title III. Workforce Investment-Related Activities and Wagner-Peyser Act Title IV. Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 Title V. General Provisions $3 billion program Main Formula Programs Adults individuals over the age of 18 with barriers to employment Dislocated Workers individuals who have been laid off or received notice of termination of employment, are eligible for or have exhausted unemployment compensation, are self-employed but unemployed because of general economic conditions, or are displaced homemakers Youth low-income individuals between 14-21 years of age7 who meet at least one of several conditions
  • Slide 4
  • Path Towards Reauthorization
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  • Slide 6
  • Key Provisions of WIOA Increases the focus on serving the most vulnerable workerslow- income adults and youth Expands education and training options to help participants access good jobs and advance in their careers Helps disadvantaged and unemployed adults and youth earn while they learn Aligns planning and accountability policies across core programs to support more unified approaches
  • Slide 7
  • Brief WIOA Overview 7
  • Slide 8
  • Prioritize Services to Out-of-school Youth 8
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  • New and Expanded Definitions 9
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  • Expands and Improves Eligibility for Youth Services 10
  • Slide 11
  • Out-of-School Youth Definition WIAWIOA OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH.The term out-of-school youth means (A) an eligible youth who is a school dropout; or (B) an eligible youth who has received a secondary school diploma or its equivalent but is basic skills deficient, unemployed, or underemployed. The term out-of-school youth means an individual who is (i) not attending any school (as defined under State law); (ii) not younger than age 16 or older than age 24; and (iii) one or more of the following: (I) A school dropout. (II) A youth who is within the age of compulsory school attendance, but has not attended school for at least the most recent complete school year calendar quarter. (III) A recipient of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent who is a low-income individual and is (aa) basic skills deficient; or (bb) an English language learner. (IV) An individual who is subject to the juvenile or adult justice system. 11
  • Slide 12
  • Out-of-School Youth Definition WIAWIOA OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH.The term out-of-school youth means (A) an eligible youth who is a school dropout; or (B) an eligible youth who has received a secondary school diploma or its equivalent but is basic skills deficient, unemployed, or underemployed. (V) A homeless individual (as defined in section 41403(6) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 14043e2(6))), a homeless child or youth (as defined in section 725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a(2))), a runaway, in foster care or has aged out of the foster care system, a child eligible for assistance under section 477 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 677), or in an out-of-home placement. (VI) An individual who is pregnant or parenting. (VII) A youth who is an individual with a disability. (VIII) A low-income individual who requires additional assistance to enter or complete an educational program or to secure or hold employment. 12
  • Slide 13
  • In-School Youth Definition WIAWIOA ELIGIBLE YOUTH.Except as provided in subtitles C and D, the term eligible youth means an individual who (A) is not less than age 14 and not more than age 21; (B) is a low-income individual; and (C) is an individual who is one or more of the following: (i) Deficient in basic literacy skills. (ii) A school dropout. (iii) Homeless, a runaway, or a foster child. (iv) Pregnant or a parent. (v) An offender. (vi) An individual who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and hold employment. IN-SCHOOL YOUTH.In this section, the term in school youth means an individual who is (i) attending school (as defined by State law); (ii) not younger than age 14 or (unless an individual with a disability who is attending school under State law) older than age 21; (iii) a low-income individual; and (iv) one or more of the following: (I) Basic skills deficient. (II) An English language learner. (III) An offender. (IV) A homeless individual (as defined in section 41403(6) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 14043e2(6))), a homeless child or youth (as defined in section 725(2) of the Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a(2))), 13
  • Slide 14
  • In-School Youth Definition WIAWIOA ELIGIBLE YOUTH.Except as provided in subtitles C and D, the term eligible youth means an individual who (A) is not less than age 14 and not more than age 21; (B) is a low-income individual; and (C) is an individual who is one or more of the following: (i) Deficient in basic literacy skills. (ii) A school dropout. (iii) Homeless, a runaway, or a foster child. (iv) Pregnant or a parent. (v) An offender. (vi) An individual who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and hold employment. - a runaway, in foster care or has aged out of the foster care system, a child eligible for assistance under section 477 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 677), or in an out of-home placement. (V) Pregnant or parenting. (VI) A youth who is an individual with a disability. (VII) An individual who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure or hold employment. 14
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  • Expands Education and Training Options 15
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  • Pay-For-Performance WIOA Authorizes Local Workforce Development Boards to use up to 10% of their funds for pay-for- performance contract strategies. Authorizes Governors to establish incentives (using non-Federal funds) for Local Workforce Development Boards to implement pay-for-performance contract strategies for the delivery of training services. Creates a new definition of Pay-for-Performance Contract Strategy that means a procurement strategy that uses pay-for-performance contracts for training services and includes: Contracts (each with a specific amount) that will be paid to an eligible service provider based on the primary indicators of performance for the target populations identified by the Local Workforce Development Board (including individuals with barriers to employment), within a defined timetable, and which may provide for bonus payments to such service provider to expand capacity to provide effective training; A strategy for independently validating the achievement of the performance under the program; and A description of how the State or local area will reallocate funds not paid to a provider because of poor performance.
  • Slide 17
  • Career Pathways and WIOA Adds a new definition of career pathway to WIA that means a combination of rigorous and high-quality education, training, and other services. Requires the State Workforce Development Board to develop strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low- skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment. Requires the Local Workforce Development Board to develop and implement career pathways within the local area by aligning the employment, training. education, and supportive services that are needed by adults and youth, particularly individuals with barriers to employment.
  • Slide 18
  • Governance and Planning 18
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  • Statewide Youth Activities
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  • Local Elements and Requirements
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  • Program Elements
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  • Slide 23
  • Program Metrics
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  • Opportunities to Influence State and Local Planning
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  • Small Group Discussion How has your work been connected to WIA? Or the workforce system in your community? Do you have partnerships with your local workforce board? Youth council? What are some opportunities within WIOA for your work? What are some potential challenges?
  • Slide 26
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