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  • The journey started in 1888 when a group of explorers and scientists created a society for the support of geographical knowledge and to share that knowledge with the world.

    Now your students can experience that early journey through unparalleled, in-depth coverage of cultures, global events, nature, science, technology, the environment, and gripping first-person accounts of epic exploration and discovery.

    With comprehensive, timely articles and legendary photos and maps, the iconic magazine documents life on our planet and beyond, interpreting the world through the lens of personal experience:

    Jane Goodalls encounters with chimpanzees in Tanzania;

    Hiram Binghams expedition into Machu Picchu in 1911;

    Robert Ballards 1985 discovery of the Titanic on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean;

    And many more examples

    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE ARCHIVE, 1888-1994

    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE ARCHIVE, 1995-CURRENT

    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: PEOPLE, ANIMALS, AND THE WORLD

    The journey continues through present day with National Geographic Magazine Archive, 1995-Current. Changes in our world since 1995 changes in science and technology, the environment, and the cultures of the world provide unprecedented research opportunities in geography, history, world cultures and many other disciplines.

    The pages of National Geographic magazine fulfill an important role but printed, bound editions are limited in reader access and subject to loss and damage.

    Just some of the topics covered:

    Genghis Khan

    Inca Ice Maiden discovery

    Egyptian tombs exploration

    Mustang region

    Sita the tiger

    Hubble Space Telescope and Mars Rover

    Nenets, Masai and Garifuna Peoples

    Epic journeys like Megatransect and Australia by Bike

    I

    Emperorsof the e

    Greetedwith courtly

    bows, an emperorpenguin

    chick aboutfour months

    old basks at the center of

    attention.In the deadof

    theAntarcticwinter,these

    regalbirds nurturetheir

    young through relentless

    blizzards, oppressive

    darkness,andmonths of

    killing cold.Largestof 17

    penguin species, they are

    the undisputedrulersof

    earth'scoldest realm.

    By GLENN OELANDNATIONALGEOGRAPHICEDITORIALSTAPP

    Photographs byFRANS LANTING

    FEATURES

    Only 2 issue embargo very recent coverage on hot research and popular topics

    Cross-searchable with 1888-1994 content and

    with National Geographic: People, Animals, and

    the World

    Must have 1888-1994 content to subscribe to

    this set

    FEATURES

    187K+ pages in 1,224 issues

    160K+ images

    465 map supplements

    Detailed indexing of feature articles, map supplements, images and advertisements

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    mill

    er d

    esig

    n

    A RENAIS

    A restorerwipes centuriesof dirtfromaface in the Vatican'sSistine

    Chapel, as the gloomy masterwork isrenewed to a glory of color and light.

    V HO WOULD DARE changethe arms of God on the

    first day of Creation?Michelangelo. First he

    scribed outlines for God'sarms into wet plaster with quick strokes ofa sharp tool. Then he abandoned thoseoutlines in a flash of brushstrokes. Hepainted God's left arm so it swept directlyoverhead, made that arm plunge a divinehand into the turbulent light and wrenchit from the darkness (page 697).

    The Sistine Chapel quivers still with theaftershocks of Michelangelo's daringnow even more as nine years of carefulcleaning and restoration by Vaticanexperts come to an end. They have beenseparating darkness -the accumulatedgrime of nearly five centuries - fromMichelangelo's light. It is a light to amazethe eye and blind the soul.

    Yet what a reluctant light it was, for theartist was cajoled and harassed, forcedreally, into completing one of the crowning masterpieces of Western civilization.

    (Continuedon page 696)

    By DAVID JEFFERY ASSISTANT EDITOR

    Photographs by ADAM WOOLFITTand VICTOR R. BOSWELL, JR.NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHER

    COURTESY THE VATICAN MUSEUMS,WITH SPECIAL CONSENT OFNIPPON TELEVISION NETWORK CORPORATION

    688

    SANCE FOR

    The journey is enriched through this new resource featuring a collection of National Geographic books, images, maps and videos as well as National Geographic Traveler magazine and includes:

    New exciting multimedia resource!

    Full-text books on travel, science & technology, history, environment, animals, photography, and peoples & cultures

    Videos covering such topics as the Islamic world, alternative energy and the lifestyle of beluga whales

    655 full-color maps and atlases to support student learning and assignments

    National Geographic Traveler magazine from 2010 to the present

    Must have 1888-1994 content to subscribe to this collection

    600 downloadable National Geographic images

    All cross-searchable on the National Geographic Virtual Library platform

    FREE TRIAL: WWW.GALE.CENGAGE.COM/NGVL

    A~ S A LS

    IE

    }3S~ t,,,*S-5 -- .0 - I - - S S - *5 *0S 5

    I ill

    Sli AFREE TRIAL: WWW.GALE.CENGAGE.COM/NGVL

  • AN ESSENTIAL RESOURCE FOR 21ST CENTURY LEARNERS

    The National Geographic Virtual Library delivers the diverse and intriguing content 21st century learners

    desire. It challenges students to think about the world

    from multiple perspectives, such as comparing first-hand

    accounts with contemporary news coverage. Multiple

    media types such as photographs and videos - enliven

    learning, bridge understanding and reinforce the

    development of information literacy skills.

    Now you can bring the National Geographic Society

    to your students. Start their journey with National Geographic Magazine Archive, 1888-1994, continue their journey with National Geographic Magazine Archive, 1995-Current, and enrich their journey with the new National Geographic: People, Animals, and the World.

    Source code: 13P-RF0534 CMD 11/12

    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC VIRTUAL LIBRARY

    1-800-877-GALEwww.gale.cengage.com/ngvl

    Sign up for a FREE trial

    of National Geographic

    or contact your Gale

    Representative at

    www.gale.cengage.com/ngvl

    for details.

    Bringing the National Geographic Society to

    DIGITAL LIFE

    32 NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DECEMBER 2007

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    Double row of spineson neck and back

    iIA

    WHEN 130-125 million years agoWHERE Argentina

    Like the tail fins on a 1959 Cadillac,a bizarre double row of spinesextending from the vertebrae ofAmargasaurus(right) may haveserved little purpose other thanto turn heads. Since the discoveryof the sauropod was announcedin 1991, paleontologists havepondered the function of thedelicate bony rods, which wouldhave offered limited defense atbest against predators. Perhapsthey were covered with skin,forming sails similar to those onsome living lizards. If so, Amargasaurusmight have flushed

    blood into the sails to help coolits body. But their likely function,says Smithsonian paleontologistHans-Dieter Sues, was to attractmates or intimidate rivals. "Inevolution nothing is really bizarre.Every structure makes perfectlygood sense to the organism. Inthe case of extinct animals thechallenge is to identify what thepurpose might have been."

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