Mortimer Adler Middle School/Perennialism School of Thought

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A Perennialism School

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<ul><li> 1. By: Lisa Clark, Krista Sipayung Fizette, &amp;Monica Oaks MORTIMER ADLER MIDDLE SCHOOL </li> <li> 2. Mortimer Adler believed critical thinking and strategies that engage students in dialogue with the great writers. In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but how many can get through to you (BrainyQuotes). Teachers are the knowledge holders, and this knowledge should be organized and factual and should come from the great books. Adler Middle School holds these beliefs. MORTIMER ADLER </li> <li> 3. The roots of Perennialism philosophy of education can be found by looking at the greats throughout history Aristotle Plato St. Thomas Aquinas More recently Robert Hutchins Mortimer Adler PERENNIALISM WHERE DID IT COME FROM? </li> <li> 4. Perennialism states that students should be educated in ideas that have been around a long, long, time. New ideas that could be considered culturally popular should not be taught in the classroom. They believe education is good when students acquire understanding of unchanging/universal principles (such as gravity). Teachers should set their classrooms up to stimulate students minds to become critical thinkers. This philosophy also wants schools to make sure students learn about the ideas of Western civilization. To do this, reading great works and having discussions about them, where the teacher is looked at as the knowledge holder, is the main focus. When you do this, it helps develop ideas that can add on to what we already know about universal truths. WHAT IS PERENNIALISM? </li> <li> 5. Equip students to become critical thinkers. Prepares and trains students with skills and knowledge that enable them to contribute positively in society. CURRICULUM </li> <li> 6. English Languages History Mathematics Natural Sciences Arts Religion Philosophy with an emphasis on universal principles The Great Books of the past (Great ideas of Western civilization) and contemporary literature, adolescent fiction, and classics. Students Will Learn Learning is Based on CURRICULUM </li> <li> 7. At Mortimer Adler Middle School, we know our teachers are the knowledge holders. They are the ones directing the learning and our students have the privilege in learning from them. We have 3 teaching strategies. Didactic Teaching ( Lecture) Socratic Method Coaching (Small Group) TEACHING STRATEGIES </li> <li> 8. The Theory of Relativity by Albert Einstein The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne Starry Messenger By Galileo Galilei The History of Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Don Juan by Lord Byron Tragedies by Sophocles Dialogues by Plato Oliver Twist and A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau Moby Dick by Herman Melville The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Mathematic Principles of Natural Philosophy by Isaac Newton THE GREAT BOOKS </li> <li> 9. Iliad The Odyssey by Homer Shakespeare Gullivers Travels Jonathan Swift Experience &amp; Education John Dewey The Beast in the Jungle Henry James Saint Joan George Bernard Shaw The Metamorphosis Franz Kafka The Wasteland T.S. Eliot A Rose for Emily William Faulkner Animal Farm George Orwell The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald THE GREAT BOOKS </li> <li> 10. 6th ELA: Reading material Shakespeare Othello; King Lear Macbeth, p 198 Homer The Odyssey, p 1 7th Math: Reading material to support learning Newton Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosopy; Preface, Definition, Book III page 161 (Link) Bible: Noahs Ark 8th Government (Social Studies): PLATO, The Republic, Books II-V; p. 1. ARISTOTLE, Politics, Book I; p. 17. LEARNING EXAMPLES </li> <li> 11. Orderly seating arrangements Desks arranged in rows and students (Philosophy of Education, 2006) CLASSROOM STRUCTURE </li> <li> 12. Strict rules that are compiled by teacher and school Students have NO input Punishment and Reward system Students will remain orderly in all aspects of school life DISCIPLINE </li> <li> 13. Boys: Shirts Polo shirts of either white or navy blue with no names, logos or designs present are acceptable in either long or short-sleeved. Polo shirts with school name or logo on it may be purchased. Dress Shirts Button down dress shirts of either white or navy blue, either long or short-sleeved. Stripes, logos, or designs, are not acceptable, unless it is the school name or logo. Sweaters or Vests Sweaters of both white or navy blue that are void of stripes, logos, or designs are acceptable, either cable knit or fleece. Pullovers or button-up cardigans are acceptable. Dress Pants Khaki or navy blue pants are acceptable, and they are not to have cargo pockets, Sweatpants and running style pants are not allowed. Shoes Plain sneakers or shoes are allowed. DRESS CODE </li> <li> 14. Girls: Shirts Polo shirts of either white or navy blue with no names, logos or designs present are acceptable in either long or short-sleeved. Polo shirts with school name or logo on it may be purchased. Dress shirt or Blouse Button down dress shirts or blouses of either white or navy blue, either long or short-sleeved. Stripes, logos, or designs, are not acceptable, unless it is the school name or logo. Sweaters or Vests Sweaters of both white or navy blue that are void of stripes, logos, or designs are acceptable, either cable knit or fleece. Pullovers or button-up cardigans are acceptable. Skirts, skorts, or jumpers These may be in the colors of khaki or navy blue with no stripes, designs or logos. They must not be shorter than knee length, and cannot be more than 2 inches below the knee. Dress Pants Khaki or navy blue pants are acceptable. Capri pants of the same colors may only be worn during the designated months. Neither are to have cargo pockets. Leggings, sweats and running pants are not acceptable forms of dress. Shoes Plain sneakers or shoes are allowed. No heels or tall boots. DRESS CODE </li> <li> 15. Staffing *$5,000,000* Operational Costs $50,000 School Improvement $7,000 Instructional Material Flex $60,000 (Funds for necessary instructional materials to be used as the principal so decides.) Library/Media $25,000 Science $10,000 School Technology $25,000 Custodial Supplies $9,000 Electricity $350,000 Utilities $30,000 Telephone $5,500 ___________________________________ Total School Budget = $5,571,500 A great deal is spent on library/media to ensure that the great books are accessible to all students SCHOOL BUDGET </li> <li> 16. Tuition (per year): 1 child - $4,200 2 children - $5,100 3 children - $5,000 Each additional child - $1200 School occupancy 600 students COST OF ATTENDANCE </li> <li> 17. BrainyQuote. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/mortimer_adler.html Philosophy of education. (2006, April 26). McGraw Hill. Retrieved from http://highered.mcgraw- hill.com/sites/dl/free/0073525901/419185/sad25901_ch08.pdf REFERENCES </li> </ul>

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