manual de instalacion waukesha

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  • CHAPTER 1 PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING

    1-2 Form 1091 (Eighth Edition)

    SECTION 1 DETERMINING INERTIA BLOCK OR PAD SIZE RECOMMENDED MINIMUM STANDARDSWidth of the inertia block or pad (W)The inertia block or pad width is to be at least one foot (30.5 cm) wider than thebase of the engine or the common skid to be installed.Length of the inertia block or pad (L)The inertia block or pad length is to be at least one foot (30.5 cm) longer than thecombined length of the base of the engine and driven equipment to be installed.Height of the inertia block or pad (H)With the length and width of the inertia block controlled by the package dimen-sions, the height will be controlled by the desired weight of the block. Waukesharecommends using a foundation specialist to determine what inertia block weightand isolation will be required to minimize vibration transmitted to the surroundingenvironment. Waukesha provides engine unbalance forces and moments in theDrive Data section of the General Tech Data Binder. This information, along withthe driven machine unbalance information would be required to properly calculatevibration transmission.In the absence of calculations for the proper inertia block weight, Waukesha rec-ommends the weight of the inertia block equal 1.3 to 1.5 times the weight of allequipment mounted on the inertia block or pad.This includes accessory equipment and the weight of all liquids (coolant, oil, andfuel) supported by the inertia block.Weights of LiquidsWater.................................................................................8.03 lb/gal (1.00 kg/liter)Water/Glycol......................................................................8.55 lb/gal (1.02 kg/liter)Lube Oil.............................................................................7.60 lb/gal (0.91 kg/liter)Diesel Fuel ........................................................................7.10 lb/gal (0.85 kg/liter)

    Figure 1-2 Schematic of Inertia Pad

    LW

    H

  • PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING CHAPTER 1

    Form 1091 (Eighth Edition) 1-3

    The depth of the inertia block or pad may be found by the following:

    The final decision on inertia block or pad size should be made only after calculat-ing the weight of the inertia block or pad plus the weight of the equipment, andcomparing this figure to the soil bearing load of the installation site.

    U.S. Customary Formula Metric Equivalent Formula

    Where:

    H = Depth of inertia block or pad (width plus one foot) in feet.

    H = Depth of inertia block or pad in meters.

    1.3 to 1.5 = Constant depending on type of engine. For more vibration prone engines such as diesels and V-8's, use the higher value. This will provide more mass for vibration damp-ening.

    1.3 to 1.5 = Constant depending on type of engine. For more vibration prone engines such as diesels and V-8's use the higher value. This will provide more mass for vibration damp-ening.

    M = Weight of engine in pounds. M = Weight of engine in kilograms.

    L = Length of inertia block or pad (engine or common skid length plus one foot) in feet.

    L = Length of inertia block or pad (engine or common skid length plus 30 cm) in meters.

    W = Width of inertia block or pad (engine or common skid width plus one foot) in feet.

    W = Width of inertia block or pad (engine or common skid width plus 30 cm) in meters.

    135 = Density of concrete (lbs. per cubic foot)

    2162 = Density of concrete (kilograms per cubic meter).

    Example: F3521GSI

    M = 15,000 lbs. M = 6808 kg

    L = 9.3 ft. L = 2.84 m

    W = 4.5 ft. W = 1.37 m

    H = 3.75 ft. deep H = 1.13 m deep

    H 1.3 to 1.5 ML W 135-----------------------------------= H1.3 to 1.5 ML W 2162-----------------------------------=

    H 1.4 15 000, 9.3 4.5 135 ------------------------------------------= H1.4 6808

    2.84 1.37 2162 ----------------------------------------------------=

    H 210005650----------------= H95318412-------------=

  • CHAPTER 1 PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING

    1-4 Form 1091 (Eighth Edition)

    SECTION 2 DETERMINING REQUIRED SOIL BEARING LOADThe next step is to determine if the weight of an inertia block or pad of this sizeplus the weight of the engine (and driven equipment, if mounted on a commonskid) exceeds the safe soil bearing load.The necessary soil bearing load (S.B.L.) can be determined with the following for-mula:

    Where:

    2.5 = Safety constantM = Weight of engineW = Width of inertia block or padL = Length of inertia block or padF = Weight of engine (or engine and driven equipment if mounted on a commonskid - see Note 1)The weight of the inertia block or pad (F) must first be determined.The weight is determined by the following formula:Weight of inertia block or pad = W x L x H x density of the concrete

    NOTE: 1. The above example only takes into account the weight and size of theengine. An actual installation would have to include the weight of the engine andthe driven equipment, and the weight of a common mounting skid large enough tosupport both the engine and driven equipment.2. An equivalent calculation applies for driven equipment mounted on a separateskid.

    Example: F3521GSI

    F = 4.5 x 9.3 x 3.75 x 135 lb/ft3 F=1.37 m x 2.84 m x 1.13 m x 2162kg/mr3

    F = 21187 lb. F = 9505 kg.

    Now that F is known, the required soil bearing load can be determined using thegiven formula.

    Required S.B.L.=2161.7lbs/sq.ft. Required S.B.L. = 10483.9 kg/m2

    S.B.L. 2.5 M F+ W L ---------------------------------=

    S.B.L. 2.5 M F+ W L ---------------------------------=

    S.B.L. 2.5 15 000, 21 187,+ 4.5 9.3----------------------------------------------------------------= S.B.L.2.5 6808 9505+ 1.37 m 2.84 m---------------------------------------------------=

    S.B.L. 90467.5 lb.41.85 sq. ft.-------------------------------= S.B.L.40782.5 kg.

    3.89 m2 ------------------------------------=

  • PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING CHAPTER 1

    Form 1091 (Eighth Edition) 1-5

    Now that the required soil bearing load has been determined, refer to Table 1-1 todetermine if the supporting material at the engine site can support the weight.If the required soil bearing load exceeds suggested standards, footings may haveto be incorporated to give the inertia block or pad a larger support area (seeFigure 1-3).Table 1-1

    NOTE: This table gives approximate values for average conditions. Building coderequirements may vary and should be consulted for a particular locality.

    Figure 1-3 Footing for Poor Bearing Soil

    NATURE OF SUPPORTING

    MATERIAL

    SAFE BEARING CAPACITY

    (LBS. PER SQUARE FT.) KG/M2

    Hard rock Granite, etc. 50,000 200,000 240,000 980,000

    Medium rock Shale, etc. 20,000 30,000 100,000 150,000

    Hard pan 16,000 20,000 80,000 100,000

    Soft rock 10,000 20,000 50,000 100,000

    Compacted sand & gravel 10,000 12,000 50,000 60,000

    Hard clay 8,000 10,000 40,000 50,000

    Gravel & coarse sand 8,000 10,000 40,000 50,000

    Loose, medium and coarse sand, compacted fine sand 6,000 8,000 30,000 40,000

    Medium clay 4,000 8,000 20,000 40,000

    Loose fine sand 2,000 4,000 10,000 20,000

    Soft clay 2,000 15,000

    NORMAL SOIL POOR BEARING SOIL

  • CHAPTER 1 PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING

    1-6 Form 1091 (Eighth Edition)

    SECTION 3 CONCRETE MIXTUREUse one part cement, two parts sand and three parts aggregrate by volume, witha maximum slump of 4 inch (100 mm) providing a 28-day compressive strength of3000 psi (211 kg/cm2).

    SECTION 4 INERTIA BLOCK REINFORCEMENTThe concrete reinforcing network should be a 10 in. x 10 in. (254 mm x 254 mm)steel wire fabric or equivalent which is 0.155 in. (3.9 mm) diameter minimum. Itshould be placed 2 inches (51 mm) from the top and bottom surfaces with eachlevel spaced 6 in. (152 mm) apart.An alternate method of reinforcing is to place a level of 3/4 in. (19 mm) diameterreinforcing rod, or equivalent, on 6 in. (152 mm) centers in both directions. A levelshould be placed 2 inches (51 mm) from the top and bottom surfaces. Rod place-ment should take into consideration interference with inertia block or pad mount-ing bolts and sleeves.

    Figure 1-4 Common Skid Mounted Directly to Inertia Block or Pad

    SCHEMATIC FOR DIRECT MOUNTING PAD CONSTRUCTION

    COMMON SKID

    HEXNUT FLAT WASHER

    SHIM

    LINER

    FLOOR SLAB

    CONVOLUTED TUBE SLEEVE

    INERTIA BLOCK

    MOUNTING BOLT

    REINFORCING

  • PREPARATION FOR MOUNTING CHAPTER 1

    Form 1091 (Eighth Edition) 1-7

    SECTION 5 VIBRATION ISOLATIONThe inertia block or pad (spring isolated engine) is an important factor in isolatingengine vibration from the surrounding structure. Many times however this is notenough. There are several additional techniques that can be used to isolate thevibration.Isolating LinersA liner can be fabricated and used to line the pit into which the concrete inertiablock is poured (see Figure 1-5.) A number of suitable liners are available com-mercially. Consult the liner manufacturer for specific information. The principle forall liners is the same line the bottom and sides of the pit, and pour the concreteinertia block inside of the isolator lining. The engine and/or common mounting skidwill still vibrate, but the vibration is dampened and largely confined within the liner.Be sure to construct the liner so that no liquid concrete can flow into gapsbetween the liner slabs. If concrete seeps between the inertia block and the pit,the vibration absorption value of the liner will be greatly reduced.Other materials such as sand or gravel may be used as isolating mediums. Onefoot of well tamped, settled gravel under the inertia block will be satisfactory.Do not bridge the gap between the inertia block and the surroundin