lessons learned from past notable disasters chile part 2: windstorms walter hays, global alliance...

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  • Slide 1
  • LESSONS LEARNED FROM PAST NOTABLE DISASTERS CHILE PART 2: WINDSTORMS Walter Hays, Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction, Vienna, Virginia, USA
  • Slide 2
  • NATURAL HAZARDS THAT HAVE CAUSED DISASTERS IN CHILE FLOODS WINDSTORMS EARTHQUAKES/TSUNAMIS VOLCANOES WILDFIRES GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE HIGH BENEFIT/COST FROM BECOMING DISASTER NRESILIENT GOAL: PROTECT PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES
  • Slide 3
  • Natural Phenomena that Cause Disasters Planet Earths atmospheric- hydrospheric- lithospheric interactions create SEVERE WINDSTORMS
  • Slide 4
  • HIGH POTENTIAL LOSS EXPOSURES IN A SEVERE WINDSTORM Entire communities; People, property, infra- structure, business enterprise, government centers, crops, wildlife, and natural resources.
  • Slide 5
  • FORTUNATELY, CHILES WINDSTORMS, ALTHOUGH DAMAGING, ARE USUALLY NOT CLASSIFIED AS SEVERE
  • Slide 6
  • NOTABLE WINDSTORMS IN CHILE JULY 22, 2011 (WHITE EARTHQUAKE) JULY 6, 2011 (DESERT STORM) JUNE 8, 2011 (TORNADO) JULY 29, 2000 (RAINSTORM)
  • Slide 7
  • Natural Phenomena that Cause Disasters Planet Earths atmospheric- hydrospheric- lithospheric interactions create WHITE EARTH- QUAKES
  • Slide 8
  • WHITE EARTHQUAKE HITS EIGHT MUNICIPALITIES Eight municipalities of Chile were isolated by a 'white earthquake' of heavy snow with drifts of up to 2 meters or more of snow (equal to the normal snowfall in a 4 month period). The government declared these municipalities a "disaster area."
  • Slide 9
  • THE WHITE EARTHQUAKE
  • Slide 10
  • CHILES CITIES (NOTE: ATACAMA DESERT IN NORTH)
  • Slide 11
  • JULY 6, 2011
  • Slide 12
  • The Atacama is the world's driest desert, where wetting rains are truly rare visitors.
  • Slide 13
  • JULY 6, 2011 A winter storm with unusual rain, high winds, and mountain snow struck the northern desert regions of Antofagasta and Atacama only days after another rare desert storm.
  • Slide 14
  • JULY 6, 2011 Roads were cut off and flights disrupted in an area that holds some of the world's biggest, most productive copper mines.
  • Slide 15
  • JUNE 8, 2011 WINDSTORM This windstorm was a tornado, a rare event for Chile. It struck the heart of the town of Villarrica in southern Chile with winds of 125 to 183 kph (75 to 110 mph).
  • Slide 16
  • Villarrica, a city and commune in southern Chile, is located on the western shore of Villarrica Lake near the active Villarrica volcano, 746 km (464 mi) south of Santiago, the capital.
  • Slide 17
  • VILLARRICA
  • Slide 18
  • IMPACTS OF THE WINDSTORM Only damage and nine injuries this time.
  • Slide 19
  • SANTIAGO SKYLINE
  • Slide 20
  • This disaster exposed Chiles lack of disaster planning and disaster-resilient infrastructure in 2000, and led to concerted efforts to improve.
  • Slide 21
  • JULY 29, 2000 WINDS AND FLOODING IMPACT THE CAPITAL A state of emergency was declared in the Santiago metropolitan region.
  • Slide 22
  • IMPACTS Schools were forced to close, train services were cancelled and electricity was cut to many areas due to the high winds.
  • Slide 23
  • IMPACTS Many homes were wiped out as a result of the 90 kph (54 mph) winds and the pouring rains, forcing thousands into shelters around Santiago.
  • Slide 24
  • JULY 29, 2000 FLOODING IMPACTED THE CAPITAL Some areas of the city were at a virtual standstill as roads were blocked and bridges collapsed
  • Slide 25
  • ELEMENTS OF HAZARDS AND RISK
  • Slide 26
  • HAZARDSHAZARDS ELEMENTS OF WINDSTORM RISK EXPOSUREEXPOSURE VULNERABILITYVULNERABILITY LOCATIONLOCATION RISKRISK
  • Slide 27
  • HAZARDS OF A SEVERE WINDSTORM (AKA POTENTIAL DISASTER AGENTS) WIND FIELD [CAT 1 (55 mph) TO CAT 5+ (155 mph or greater)] DEBRIS STORM SURGE/FLOODS HEAVY PRECIPITATION/FLOODS LANDSLIDES (MUDFLOWS) COSTAL EROSION
  • Slide 28
  • A DISASTER CAN HAPPEN WHEN THE POTENTIAL DISASTER AGENTS OF A WINDSTORM INTERACT WITH CHILES COMMUNITIES
  • Slide 29
  • WIND PENETRATING BUILDING ENVELOPE TYPHOONS UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM FLYING DEBRIS STORM SURGE IRREGULARITIES IN ELEVATION AND PLAN SITING PROBLEMS FLOODING AND LANDSLIDES CAUSES OF DAMAGE DISASTER LABORATORIES
  • Slide 30
  • A DISASTER is --- --- the set of failures that overwhelm the capability of a community to respond without external help when three continuums: 1) people, 2) community (i.e., a set of habitats, livelihoods, and social constructs), and 3) complex events (e.g., windstorms, floods,) intersect at a point in space and time.
  • Slide 31
  • Disasters are caused by s ingle- or multiple-event natural hazards that, (for various reasons), cause extreme levels of mortality, morbidity, homelessness, joblessness, economic losses, or environmental impacts.
  • Slide 32
  • THE REASONS ARE... When it does happen, the functions of the communitys buildings and infrastructure can be LOST
  • Slide 33
  • THE REASONS ARE... The community is UN- PREPARED for what will likely happen, not to mention the low-probability of occurrence high-probability of adverse consequences event.
  • Slide 34
  • THE REASONS ARE... The community has NO DISASTER PLANNING SCENARIO or WARNING SYSTEM in place as a strategic framework for early threat identification and coordinated local, national, regional, and international countermeasures.
  • Slide 35
  • THE REASONS ARE... The community LACKS THE CAPACITY TO RESPOND in a timely and effective manner to the full spectrum of expected and unexpected emergency situations.
  • Slide 36
  • THE REASONS ARE... The community is INEFFICIENT during recovery and reconstruction because it HAS NOT LEARNED from either the current experience or the cumulative prior experiences.
  • Slide 37
  • THE ALTERNATIVE TO A WINDSTORM DISASTER IS WINDSTORM DISASTER RESILIENCE
  • Slide 38
  • CHILESCOMMUNITIESCHILESCOMMUNITIES DATA BASES AND INFORMATION HAZARDS: GROUND SHAKING GROUND FAILURE SURFACE FAULTING TECTONIC DEFORMATION TSUNAMI RUN UP AFTERSHOCKS WINDSTORM HAZARDS PEOPLE & BLDGS. VULNERABILITY LOCATION WINDSTORM RISK RISK ACCEPTABLE RISK UNACCEPTABLE RISK GOAL: WINDSTORM DISASTER RESILIENCE PREPAREDNESS PROTECTION EARLY WARNING EMERGENCY RESPONSE RECOVERY and RECONSTRUCTION POLICY OPTIONS
  • Slide 39
  • TECHNOLOGIES FOR MONITORING, FORECASTING, WARNING, AND DISASTER SCENARIOS ARE VITAL FOR SURVIVAL
  • Slide 40
  • LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT DISASTER RESILIENCE ALL WIND- STORMS PREPAREDNES FOR THE EXPECTED AND UNEXPEDTED IS ESSENTIAL FOR DISASTER RESILIENCE
  • Slide 41
  • LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT DISASTER RESILIENCE ALL WIND- STORMS EARLY WARNING (THE ISS) AND EVACUATION ARE ESSENTIAL FOR DISASTER RESILIENCE
  • Slide 42
  • LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT DISASTER RESILIENCE ALL WIND- STORMS TIMELY EMERGENCY RESPONSE IS ESSENTIAL FOR DISASTER RESILIENCE
  • Slide 43
  • LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT DISASTER RESILIENCE ALL WIND- STORMS RECOVERY AND RECONSTRUCTION USUALLY TAKES LONGER THAN THOUGHT

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