learning history: a gamified activity for mobile devices

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1. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de1 Learning History: a gamified activity for mobile devices A New Culture of Learning: Computing and Next Generations IFIP, Vilnius, July, 3 Snia Cruz, sonia.cruz@braga.ucp.pt Catholic University of Portugal, Braga, Portugal Ana Amlia A. Carvalho, anaameliac@fpce.uc.pt University of Coimbra, Portugal Ins Arajo, inesaraujo@fpce.uc.pt University of Coimbra, Portugal 2. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de2 Summary MOBILE LEARNING The Republic Implantation in Portugal 6th grade Games THE PROJECT RESEARCH CONCLUSION improve learning? 3. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de3 MOBILE LEARNING Snia Cruz | soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt In recent years, mobile learning has undergone a significant transformation due to rapidly growing ownership of smartphones and tablets, accompanied by the proliferation of apps, social networks and mobile-friendly open access resources Kukulska-Hulme, 2014, p.12. Increased mobility; Time-saving; Interactive; Environmentally-friendly. 4. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de4 GAMES CAN: Snia Cruz | soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt Games, which have been applied in education for a long time, have also benefited from these advances in technology and from the portability of multiple devices. Jeong & Kim, 2007. enhance motivation; be used as a powerful mechanism for teaching formal contents; promote learning without the player even paying much attention be fun. 5. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de THE PROJECT identify the games Portuguese students play most often, especially on mobile devices. From Games to Interactive Activities for Mobile Learning Step 1 Step 2 design gamified activities for mobile devices for students of all educational levels . Step 3 apply in real learning contexts the 4 gamified activities designed. 6. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Survey Online (between May and November 2013) Characterisation of the students Characterisation of their gaming habits Preferences about games Preferences for learning school contents through games 7. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Sample 2303 players of mobile games Students from the 5th grade of Basic Education up to Masters degree level 508 players from 5th and 6th grades Respondents playing games Total Gender f % 508 Male 298 58.7 Female 210 41.3 8. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Characterisation of students Fig1. Mobile devices on which students played 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Mobile phone Smartphone Tablet PSP Nintendo 3DS Laptop Fig2. Mobile device they use the most to play their favourite game 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Mobile phone Smartphone Tablet PSP Nintendo 3DS Laptop 9. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Gaming habits 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% menos de 1h 1h a 5h 6h a 10h 11h a 20h Mais de 20h Masculino Feminino Fig3. The time students spend to games, by gender Alone 57% With others online 43% Fig4. Preference for game partners Fig4. Preference for game partners Alone 57% With others online 43% 10. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Preferences about games Table 1.: Top 5 favourite games (n=161) Game Total (N) Male (n=119) Female (n=42) N % N % 1 Grand Theft Auto (GTA) 40 39 32.8 1 2.4 2 Subway Surfers 31 16 13.4 15 35.7 3 Pou 28 6 5.1 22 52.4 4 Pro Evolution Soccer (PES) 26 26 21.8 0 0.0 5 Minecraft 18 17 14.3 5 2.4 Counter Strike (CS) 18 15 12.6 3 7.14 TOP 5 11. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Fig6.: Difficulty level of the games they played most 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Very Easy Easy Moderate Hard Very Hard menos de 1h 34% 1h to 5h 41% 6h to 10h 13% 11h t 20h 5% Mais de 20h 5% No reply 2% Fig5.: Time spent by students playing each preferred game 12. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de12 characters 79,5% graphic effects animations 70% many levels 72,4% improve ones score 70.5% Snia Cruz | soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt 79,9% 74,2%70,8% 71.1% Female Male Reasons for keeping playing 13. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de LEARNING PRINCIPLES AND GAME MECHANICS IDENTIFIED IN THE MOST PLAYED GAMES i) Psychosocial Moratorium; ii) Committed Learning Principle; iii) Amplification of Input Principle; iv) Achievement Principle; v) Practice Principle; vi) Regime of Competence; vii) Intuitive Knowledge and viii) Affinity Group Principle. (Gee, 2003) 14. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de 15. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de i) allow the formal learning of contents, ii) be a creative game that would attract students attention in order to make them learn. Planning The game 1910 has been designed according to two prerequisites: 16. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Course Content Course content: The Republic implantation in Portugal Subject: History (6th grade). 17. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Subject Late 19th century: the Portuguese monarchy faced great difficulties. 5th October 1910: a revolution established the republic in Portugal with the support of secret associations. Post revolution: - a government was created; - first elections held; - a constitution was drawn up; - several measures were taken in the social and educational fields. 18. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Students role A video will present students to the role they have to play in the game - a journalist in the year of 1890. 19. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Students role The game starts when the journalist is in the newspaper office and is asked to write a news article. The director tells him that the more the newspaper sells, the higher his salary will be (coins). 20. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de To pass to the next level, the student needs to have gained a fixed amount of coins. If the answer is wrong, the player does not get the respective coin but can progress forward till the end of that episode. At the end, the player is given the chance to recover the coins he did not win, by performing the task once again. 21. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de The tasks required from the players are distributed by episodes within a historical period with remarkable dates. 22. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de These episodes require a greater involvement of the student according to the increased complexity of the issues analysed. The tasks performed allow the player to unlock the time frames: Ex. hearing a sound or testimonials the students should find the right word. 23. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de LEARNING PRINCIPLES AND GAME MECHANICS IN GAME: 1910 Avatar (represents the player) Committed Learning Principle (Gee, 2003) World (space action) Psychosocial Moratorium; Amplification of Input Principle (Gee, 2003) Quest (tasks), Practice Principle; Regime of Competence; (Gee, 2003) Feedback (players glad with the accomplishments achieved) Achievement Principle, Intuitive Knowledge (Gee, 2003) 24. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de The designed game can be used in two different ways. Teachers role The students play the game out of the classroom, but the teacher knows the students' results by checking the report in an slide page. It can also be used in the classroom to introduce the new subject or to reinforce a subject already studied. 25. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de Implementation The design of the game is still in progress but it will be tested in September by the beginning of the school year. 26. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de26Snia Cruz | soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt CONCLUSION STUDENTS ARE RECEPTIVE TO USING GAMES IN COURSE ACTIVITIES TO LEARN SCHOOL SUBJECTS MOBILE LEARNING MAY FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A STUDENT-CENTRED LEARNING APPROACH MALE PLAYERS PREFER LONG GAMES AND PLAYING WITH OTHER PLAYERS ADVENTURE, ACTION AND SPORT ARE THE TYPES OF GAMES THAT PORTUGUESE STUDENTS PREFER TO USE IN CLASS. FEMALE PLAYERS PREFER SHORTER GAMES THEY CAN PLAY ALONE. GAMES CAN BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR LEARNING FORMAL CONTENTS 27. EDGAR COSTA www.edgarcosta.net 26de27 Thank you for your attention ! Snia Cruz | soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt Snia Cruz, soniacruz@braga.ucp.pt Catholic University of Portugal, Braga, Portugal Ana Amlia A. Carvalho, anaameliac@fpce.uc.pt University of Coimbra, Portugal Ins Arajo, inesaraujo@fpce.uc.pt University of Coimbra, Portugal