jespersen: chemistry: the molecular nature of matter, 7th ed states: ap 2019-06-15آ  ap chemistry...

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  • Jespersen: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter, 7th Ed

    States: AP Chemistry Course Description

    Subjects: Science

    AP Chemistry Course Description

    Science

    Adopted 2013

    Outline

    Level 1

    AP.C.1. Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all

    matter can be understood in terms of arrangements of atoms. These atoms retain their

    identity in chemical reactions.

    Outline

    Level 2

    EU.1.A. All matter is made of atoms. There are a limited number of types of atoms; these are the

    elements.

    Outline

    Level 3

    EK.1.A.1. Molecules are composed of specific combinations of atoms; different molecules are composed of combinations of different elements and of combinations of the same elements in differing amounts

    and proportions.

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.1.a. The average mass of any large number of atoms of a given element is always the same

    for a given element.

    Page 0008

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.1.b. A pure sample contains particles (or units) of one specific atom or molecule; a mixture

    contains particles (or units) of more than one specific atom or molecule.

    Page 0027

    Page 0049

    Page 0070

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.1.c. Because the molecules of a particular compound are always composed of the identical

    combination of atoms in a specific ratio, the ratio of the masses of the constituent

    elements in any pure sample of that compound is always the same.

    Page 0007

    Page 0008

    Page 0027

    Page 0070

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.1.d. Pairs of elements that form more than one type of molecule are nonetheless limited by

    their atomic nature to combine in whole number ratios. This discrete nature can be

    confirmed by calculating the difference in mass percent ratios between such types of

    molecules.

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    Outline LO 1.1. The student can justify the observation that the ratio of the masses of the constituent

    elements in any pure sample of that compound is always identical on the basis of the

  • Level 4 atomic molecular theory. [See SP 6.1]

    Page 0007

    Page 0008

    Page 0070

    Page 0120

    Outline

    Level 1

    AP.C.1. Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all

    matter can be understood in terms of arrangements of atoms. These atoms retain their

    identity in chemical reactions.

    Outline

    Level 2

    EU.1.A. All matter is made of atoms. There are a limited number of types of atoms; these are the

    elements.

    Outline

    Level 3

    EK.1.A.2. Chemical analysis provides a method for determining the relative number of atoms in a substance, which can be used to identify the substance or determine its purity.

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.2.a. Because compounds are composed of atoms with known masses, there is a

    correspondence between the mass percent of the elements in a compound and the

    relative number of atoms of each element.

    Page 0118

    Page 0120

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.2.b. An empirical formula is the lowest whole number ratio of atoms in a compound. Two

    molecules of the same elements with identical mass percent of their constituent atoms

    will have identical empirical formulas.

    Page 0118

    Page 0120

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.2.c. Because pure compounds have a specific mass percent of each element, experimental

    measurements of mass percents can be used to verify the purity of compounds.

    Page 0118

    Page 0120

    Outline

    Level 4

    LO 1.2. The student is able to select and apply mathematical routines to mass data to identify or

    infer the composition of pure substances and/or mixtures. [See SP 2.2]

    Page 0109

    Page 0115

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    Outline

    Level 4

    LO 1.3. The student is able to select and apply mathematical relationships to mass data in order

    to justify a claim regarding the identity and/or estimated purity of a substance. [See SP

    2.2, 6.1]

    Page 0118

    Page 0120

    Page 0129

    Page 0137

    Page 0141

    Outline

    Level 1

    AP.C.1. Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all

    matter can be understood in terms of arrangements of atoms. These atoms retain their

    identity in chemical reactions.

    Outline

    Level 2

    EU.1.A. All matter is made of atoms. There are a limited number of types of atoms; these are the

    elements.

    Outline

    Level 3

    EK.1.A.3. The mole is the fundamental unit for counting numbers of particles on the macroscopic level and allows quantitative connections to be drawn between laboratory experiments, which occur at the

    macroscopic level, and chemical processes, which occur at the atomic level.

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.3.a. Atoms and molecules interact with one another on the atomic level. Balanced chemical

    equations give the number of particles that react and the number of particles produced.

    Because of this, expressing the amount of a substance in terms of the number of

    particles, or moles of particles, is essential to understanding chemical processes.

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    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.3.b. Expressing the mass of an individual atom or molecule in atomic mass unit (amu) is

    useful because the average mass in amu of one particle (atom or molecule) of a

    substance will always be numerically equal to the molar mass of that substance in

    grams.

    Page 0008

    Page 0109

    Page 0115

    Page 0118

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.3.c. Avogadro’s number provides the connection between the number of moles in a pure

    sample of a substance and the number of constituent particles (or units) of that

    substance.

    Page 0109

    Page 0115

    Page 0118

    Page 0120

    Page 0129

    Page 0137

    Page 0141

    Page 0184

    Page 0191

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    Page 0709

    Page 0945

    Outline

    Level 4

    1.A.3.d. Thus, for any sample of a pure substance, there is a specific numerical relationship

    between the molar mass of the substance, the mass of the sample, and the number of

    particles (or units) present.

  • Page 0008

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    Page 0129

    Page 0137

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    Page 0195

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    Outline

    Level 4

    LO 1

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