ispor connections vol. 14 no 1

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  • IN THIS ISSUE

    CONNECTIONSCONNECTIONSUNITING SCIENCE AND PRACTICEISP R

    JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2008 VOL. 14, NO. 1

    INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PHARMACOECONOMICS AND OUTCOMES RESEARCH

    LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

    PRESIDENTS MESSAGE

    Translational Research and the Value Equation

    POLICY ANALYSIS

    The Age of Health Economics: The Impact of IQWIG on the GermanPharmaceutical Market

    Levels of Association Between Health Care Expenditure and Health CareIndicators in Economically Developed Countries

    OUTCOMES

    Raising the Bar in the USA: The Impact of Heightened Awareness of the Needfor Health-Economic Data in the Absence of a Regulatory Mandate

    POLICY ANALYSIS

    Commentary: Reflections on Sicko by Michael Moore from a European Pointof View

    ISPOR CORNER

    Board of Directors Take Action in 2007

    ISPOR Board of Directors Election Candidates 2008

    ISPOR Student Corner: Authorship Declines in Economic Evaluations

    Recently Published Works: Using Pharmacoeconomics Innovatively

    ISPOR 3rd Asia-Pacific Conference Call for Abstracts

    ISPOR 13th Annual International Meeting Program

    ISPOR 13th Annual International Meeting Short Courses

    ISPOR 13th Annual International Meeting Promotional Information

    ISPOR 13th Annual International Meeting Registration

  • Copyright 2008 International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) All rights reserved under International and Pan-AmericanCopyright Conventions. Published in the United States of America by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. No part ofthis publication may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, taping,or information storage and retrieval systems without express written permission of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research.ISPOR and ISPOR CONNECTIONS are trademarks of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Inquiries should be addressedto: International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, 3100 Princeton Pike, Building 3, Suite E, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 USA

    ISPOR 2007-2008 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

    PRESIDENT Diana Brixner PhD, RPh, University ofUtah/Pharmacotherapy, dbrixner@hsc.utah.edu

    PAST PRESIDENT Michael F. Drummond PhD, University ofYork, md18@york.ac.uk

    PRESIDENT-ELECT Chris L. Pashos PhD, HERQuLES,chris_pashos@abtassoc.com

    DIRECTORS Marc Berger MD, Eli Lilly and Company, bergerma@lilly.com; Lou Garrison, PhD, University ofWashington, lgarrisn@u.washington.edu; Shu-Chen Li PhD,University of Newcastle, shuchuen.li@newcastle.edu.au; UweSiebert MD, University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics& Technology, uwe.siebert@umit.at; Richard J. Willke PhD,Pfizer, Richard.J.Willke@pfizer.com

    TREASURER Karen Rascati RPh, PhD, University of Texas,krascati@mail.utexas.edu

    FOUNDING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Marilyn Dix Smith RPh,PhD, ISPOR, mdsmith@ispor.org

    ISPOR CONNECTIONS EDITOR & EDITORIAL BOARDEDITOR-IN-CHIEF Steven E. Marx PharmD, MS, AbbottLaboratories, isporconnections@ispor.org

    ASSOCIATE EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Thomas Mittendorf PhD,University of Hannover, tm@ivbl.uni-hannover.de; DavidThompson PhD, i3 Innovus, david.thompson@i3innovus.com

    EDITORIAL BOARD Rajesh Balkrishnan PhD, MS, Ohio StateUniversity; Benjamin Craig PhD, University of South Florida;Bonnie M. Korenblat Donato PhD, Bristol Myers Squib; MarcNuijten PhD, MD, MBA, Imta, Erasmus University; MichaelWonder BSc, BPharm, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Australia; Peter Wong RPH, MS, MBA, PhD, Good Samaritan Hospital

    ISPOR CONNECTIONS PUBLISHING, SUBSCRIPTION,AND ADVERTISING OFFICE: ISPOR CONNECTIONS (ISSN 1538-5108) (USPS 019121) is published bi-monthly by the International Society forPharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, 3100 PrincetonPike, Building 3, Suite E, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 USA. Phone: 609-219-0773 Toll Free: 1-800-992-0643Fax: 609-219-0774 Website: www.ispor.orgAnnual membership dues include $30 for regular members and$15 for student members for a 1-year subscription to ISPORCONNECTIONS.

    Periodicals Postage paid at Trenton, New Jersey and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changesto ISPOR CONNECTIONS, 3100 Princeton Pike, Building 3, SuiteE, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 USA.Managing Editor: Stephen L. Priori, email: spriori@ispor.org Advertising Manager: Danielle Mroz, email: dmroz@ispor.org

    Direct advertising, photocopy permission, and reprint requests,to Managing Editor.

    All members of the Board of Directors serve in their personal capacity and do notrepresent the views of their organization during Board activities. All members of theBoard of Directors annually disclose any conflicts of interest concerning businessrelationships with the Society. See: http://www.ispor.org/board/index.asp.

    2 January/February 2008 ISPOR CONNECTIONS

    LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

    Ten Most Influential Authors in 2007: Steve Marx's Picks

    At the end of the year, we read about the ten best and worst

    of movies, dressed, jobs, etc. But who in health econom-

    ics & outcomes research were the most influential authors

    to you? Well, I attempted again to identify them by

    conducting a Medline search using the following search terms: cost-effectiveness

    or quality of life from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007. There were

    3,005 articles sited under cost-effectiveness and 10,686 articles under quality of

    life, which are both slightly higher from last year. The initial screening criteria

    requirement was first author of at least 3 articles that resulted in 20 cost-

    effectiveness authors, and 62 quality of life authors. Of the 82 authors identified a

    search of each authors name and articles related to cost-effectiveness or quality

    of life were quantified and weighted for each term. The following top ten authors in

    alphabetical order were identified:

    2007 TOP TEN AUTHORS Samuel Aballea Dennis Revicki *

    David Cella * Thomas Rosemann

    Greg de Lissovoy Michael Schatz

    Michael Drummond * Andrew Shorr

    Barbara Murphy Kenneth Smith

    * Last year winners

    Congratulations to all the movers and shakers or the Chubby Checkers of health

    economics & outcomes research for making a difference in 2007. Let's start doing

    some of our own twisting and shouting, by presenting and authoring our own stud-

    ies to demonstrate the value of health economics for decision makers. Again, these

    are my picks, not the association. If you have suggestions on improving

    the methodology to identify these authors next year, I look forward to your

    suggestions.

    On behalf of the editorial members and ISPOR staff, we look forward to and inform-

    ative and productive New Year.

    Steve Marx, Editor-in-Chief

    ISPOR CONNECTIONS

  • Arecent commentary published in the Journalof the American Medical Associationaddressed the Meaning of TranslationalResearch and Why it Matters [1]. In light ofISPOR related topics such as outcomesresearch, comparative effectiveness, cost-effec-tiveness, and pharmacoeconomics, it seemstimely to consider where these disciplines fit inthe continuum of translational research.

    As Woolf acknowledges in his article, translation-al research means different things to differentpeople. The more traditional definition of bench

    to bedside encompasses drug discovery(medicinal chemistry), drug formulation (phar-maceutics), drug testing (pharmacology andclinical development), and patient care (pharma-cotherapy). These definitions align particularlywell with the Departments in our own College ofPharmacy at the University of Utah, and, mostlikely, with various other colleges and pharma-ceutical companies across the globe. TheInstitute of Medicine (IOM) Clinical ResearchRoundtable has labeled this definition as trans-lational block one, or T1 [2]. The componentsof T1 have been traditionally funded by individualNational Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes andnow collectively through the NIH roadmap initia-tive [3] and by the launch of the Clinical andTranslational Science Award (CTSA) with a goalof $500 million in funding across 60 academiccenters by 2012.

    An alternative definition of translational research,perhaps more relevant to the disciplines repre-sented by ISPOR and other population-basedorganizations such as the International Society ofPharmacoepidemiology, Academy Health,Society for Medical Decision Making and others,would be translating research into practice.Here the disciplines of epidemiology, evidence-based synthesis, economics, public policy,behavioral science, and biostatistics play a muchlarger role in understanding how the real world ofclinical practice, patient behaviors, and concomi-tant disease can impact the predictions of thehighest quality research produced by randomizedclinical trials. The IOM Clinical ResearchRoundtable labeled this as translational blocktwo or T2 [2]. The challenges of this type ofresearch abound. In specific research on how anew technology can be introduced into practice,one must consider the nuances of a health caresystem that has previously operated in theabsence of such technology. Treatment guide-lines are reviewed and revised, systematicreviews are redone, and documentation, such asthe Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy(AMCP) Dossier and dossiers for other globalregion reimbursement agencies, is prepared andupdated. The evidence that is created to supportthese documents is largely conducted in patientpopulations from primary care physician prac-tices, integrated health care systems, and nation-al administrative claims databases. This realworld r