IAHR - XIXth CONGRESS, NEW DELHI (INDIA) 1981

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  • This article was downloaded by: [University of Ulster Library]On: 25 November 2014, At: 03:21Publisher: Taylor & FrancisInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registeredoffice: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

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    IAHR - XIXth CONGRESS, NEW DELHI(INDIA) 1981Published online: 22 Jan 2010.

    To cite this article: (1982) IAHR - XIXth CONGRESS, NEW DELHI (INDIA) 1981, Journal of HydraulicResearch, 20:2, 147-174, DOI: 10.1080/00221688209499493

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  • IAHR - XIXth CONGRESS, NEW DELHI (INDIA) 1981 Panel Discussion during this Congress on February 3, 1981

    on HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING EDUCATION

    - Present Trends and Future Outlooks -

    Contents Page

    Introduction - S. Bruk 147 Subject 1: Problems arising in university education - P. Novak 149 Subject 1: Experience dans Ie dmaine de l'enseignement du cours de

    l'hydraulique sur la facult hydrotechnique de l'Institut Poly-technique de Leningrad - R.R. Tchougaev et V.T. Orlov (Ex-perience in teaching hydraulics at the Faculty of Hydraulic Engineering at Leningrad Polytechnical Institute) 150

    Subject 2: The Inter-American Center for the Integral Development of Land and Water Resources (CIDIAT) - G. Uzcategui, J. Aguirre Pe and R. Rojas 153

    Subject 3: Research and education - P.C. Saxena 156 Subject 3: Economy of education and research - M. de Vries. 158 Subject 4: Transfer of know-how. Its new importance - M. Bouvard (in French

    and English) 159 Subject 4: Main problems of hydraulic engineering education in Africa -

    J.O. Sonuga 165 Subject 4: The role of UNESCO - J.S. Gladwell 169 Subject 5: Proposals for IAHR actions - M. Kozak 171 Some proposed questions for the discussion 172 Concluding remarks - S. Bruk 173

    INTRODUCTION by

    Dr. STEVAN BRUK "Jaroslav Cerni" Institute for Development of Water Resources, Belgrade, Yugoslavia

    The first panel discussion ever organized within an IAHR Congress took place in Cagliari, in 1979, on the subject: "New Developments and Needs in Hydraulics" - an obvious topic, since Hydraulics is the profession of the membership of the association. An account of this panel discussion was given in Vol. 18, 1980 No. 3 of this Journal.

    On the XIXth Congress of the IAHR in New Delhi, 1981, a second panel discussion was included into the programme, this time under the title: "Hydraulic Engineering Education - Present Trends and Future Outlooks". In the following pages, the contributions of the panel members will be presented, with an introduction of the moderator and a short summary of the discussions.

    The subject of this second panel discussion is in many ways a continuation of the first one, since all members of the IAHR are products of hydraulic engineering education and many of them, educators themselves. Research and education are closely linked and hydraulic engineering education should respond to new developments in hydraulics and the hydraulic engineering profession. IAHR has a natural and keen interest in how

    Received March 15, 1982

    Journal of Hydraulic Research 20 (1982) No. 2 147

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  • hydraulic engineers are being educated and the opinions of its members, highlighted in the Panel discussion, will certainly have an influence on educational policies of educational institutions in various countries. The purpose of the present outline is in facilitating the access of interested readers to these opinions.

    The fact that IAHR has introduced the topic of engineering education on the agenda of the Congress reflects the increased social responsibility of the hydraulic engineer, who becomes more and more involved into the social and economical implications of his project. He has to understand not only economics, but also the social decision making process, with increased public participation. Communication skill is hence becoming an important asset of the engineer: he has to be able to speak a language understood not only by specialists, but by the decision - making laymen as well. To develop this ability is a new task in engineering education.

    No argument is needed to underline the necessity of educating the hydraulic engineer for an increased environmental awareness. He will be asked not only to predict the environmental impact of his project, but also to foresee the social reactions to environmental changes. He should be ready to give honest and unbiased answers to the many questions relative to the consequences of the project, and he should be even able to anticipate most of the questions. Some of the answers would require highly professional study and sophisticated investigations.

    The hydraulic engineer of present and future days should be prepared to cope with the rapidly changing technologies of his profession, from construction methods to planning principles, with new and powerful tools of design and prediction, which develop faster than the ability of using them. In his activity, the engineer has to be fully integrated into the world-wide progress of the profession, responding to the flow of information which spreads from one end to the other of the world.

    At the same time, present days are also marked by widening gaps between societies on various levels of development. The hydraulic engineer of the day, and more so of to-morrow, must face and accept this fact. In full knowledge of the state of his art, he is confronted with the many constraints of his own environment - physical, economical, social, political, financial, etc. Instead of feeling frustrated, like the many graduates returning from advanced centers to their countries, he should relish the challenge to do the best possible job under the constraints imposed by reality. Such an attitude is part of the ethics of the engineer of present days.

    To put more emphasis on the economy of education is an imperative of the coming era, marked by irreversibly increasing costs of energy. In simple words, it is not enough to produce good engineers, but to do it for less money. Methods of education should become more rational, avoiding waste of time, resources and talent of both students and staff. The same holds for postgraduate and other research - the cuts of funds must be compensated by improved planning.

    The IAHR is an association of individual members and behaves as such. It cannot and should not assume the responsibilities of public bodies, national or international, and therefore cannot undertake actions such as setting standards, prescribing rules, issuing regulations or pretending to exercise control on any aspect of the hydraulic engineering profession, inclusive education. The IAHR can, nevertheless, be instrumental in influencing professional views by an organized exchange of ideas among its world-wide membership. The panel discussion was meant to serve this purpose, aiming at bridging the gaps which exist between the various concepts concerning - the teaching of hydraulics (subject 1) - continuing education (subject 2) - research and education (subject 3) - transfer of knowledge (subject 4)

    148 Journal de Recherches Hydrauliques 20 (1982) No. 2

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  • with an outline of the - possible actions of the IAHR (subject 5).

    On the following pages the above subjects are concisely presented in the contributions of the panel members and followed by the concluding remarks of the moderator, in an attempt to summarize the main points of the discussion.

    Subject 1: PROBLEMS ARISING IN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION by

    P. NOVAK, Professor, Department of Civil Engineering University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England

    Some problems

    1. Should there be special first U

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