Humanities and the Arts

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<ul><li><p>ARTS AND HUMANITIES CATEGORY 6 </p><p>GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT GECCIG REPORT </p><p>June 25, 2009 GECCIG COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Gerard Alosio, Thomas Hendrickson, David </p><p>Laverny-Rafter, Elizabeth Miller, Steven Smith (Chair) </p><p>A. PROCESS: </p><p>Samples of student work was gathered during Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 from students whose Tech ID ends with 5. The work collected was of many different types due to the large variety of offerings within the College of Arts and Humanities. Although this group is identified as a committee, it was determined very early on that it was difficult to work in a committee in the traditional sense where the group would assemble together and collectively go over data. It proved difficult to find a suitable meeting time. The committee also recognized that they would be faced with comparing apples and oranges due to the large variety of class formats involved. Therefore, it was decided to each individually collect and analyze data and write separate reports, with the chair of the committee submitting a summary of the data. Each committee member collected data samples and applied the following three rubrics to individually formulate whether classes in the committee members department were meeting the objectives of General Education Category 6. 1. Student can create and/or critique a work in the arts or the humanities </p><p>1. Student has observed a work of art or a work in the humanities. 2. Student can create a work of art or a work in the humanities, and critique a </p><p>work of art or a work in the humanities. 3. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can critique a </p><p>work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities. 4. Student can create a work in the arts and/or humanities, and can develop </p><p>and use acceptable criteria to critique a work of art and/or evaluate a work in the humanities. </p><p> 2. Student displays knowledge of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities. </p><p>1. Students can list works in the arts and humanities from different eras, or list works that deal with different issues from the same era. </p><p>2. Students can describe works in the arts or humanities from different eras, or discuss works that deal with different issues from the same era. </p><p>3. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts or humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues from the same era. Student comparison shows a depth of knowledge concerning the works compared. </p><p>4. Students can compare and contrast works in the arts and humanities from different eras, and compare and contrast works that deal with different issues </p></li><li><p>from the same era. Student comparison shows a depth of knowledge concerning the works compared. </p><p> 3. Student displays understanding of the relationship between the arts and the humanities and culture. </p><p>1. Student can identify a relationship or a connection between a work in the arts and/or the humanities and society. </p><p>2. Student can explain a relationship or a connection between a work in the arts and/or the humanities and society. </p><p>3. Student can explain how works in the arts and humanities help to define, create, recreate, change or sustain a society, or how that society creates conditions or constraints for the creation of works in the arts and humanities. </p><p>4. Student can explain how works in the arts and humanities help to define, create, recreate, change or sustain a society, and how that society creates conditions or constraints for the creation of works in the arts and humanities. </p><p> Each individual committee members report has been added to this document after this summary page. It was left to the discretion of each member to determine what forms of data were to be collected and how the three rubrics were to be applied. B. RESULTS Each individual committee member reached their own carefully crafted conclusions from individual analysis of all data collected and anyone reviewing this document is encouraged to review all of the individual reports. In summary, each report found that the classes examined were meeting the GECCIC 6 requirements. C. RECOMMENDATIONS </p><p>When the committee first met, its members were faced with the task of deciding to use </p><p>the existing GECCIC 6 rubrics or revise and create an improved standard to apply to all </p><p>of the data collected. The task of making such a revision was dismissed as too </p><p>daunting a task and thus the existing three rubrics were again utilized. This assessment </p><p>tool needs to be reviewed and revised by a committee whose sole purpose is to revamp </p><p>the assessment procedure. </p><p>Several of the committee members felt that a larger sampling of students would be </p><p>more suitable for accurately assessing the outcome of an entire class, rather than </p><p>depending on a much smaller sampling such as students whose Tech ID ends in 5. </p><p>Some individual committee members used a larger sampling size since they had the </p><p>data available and the resources to go over a larger set of data. In many of the smaller </p><p>classes examined, there may only be a few students representing the entire class. </p></li><li><p>This committee made great strides in overcoming the question of large format lecture </p><p>style classes where the only data available was in the form of multiple choice exams. In </p><p>this style of class, individual questions from each exam administered were selected that </p><p>specifically addressed each of the three rubrics. In this way, statistics were generated </p><p>that could demonstrate numerically whether the class being examined met the </p><p>requirements of the General Education Category. Previous GECCIC reports did not </p><p>include or examine large format classes at all. One suggestion in regards to the large </p><p>format classes is that instructors review the three rubrics and keep them in mind when </p><p>crafting exam questions to facilitate data analysis for future GECCIC reports. </p></li><li><p>FALL 2008/SPRING 2009: CATEGORY 6 ASSESSMENT OF ART 160: </p><p>ART 160: Introduction to Visual Culture </p><p>Individual assessments were completed for the following general education </p><p>course: </p><p> Art 160: Introduction to Visual Culture </p><p>We addressed the criteria for evaluation in relation to each course included </p><p>in this assessment. However, Art 160 is unique in its class size and other </p><p>aspects of course delivery. The only art course offered outside of Nelson Hall, </p><p>Art 160 seeks to provide an introduction to visual culture to over 800 </p><p>students, in four sections, each academic year. Assessment included review of </p><p>student writing assignments, qualitative information from student </p><p>interactions, and the usual quantitative measures of standard course </p><p>evaluation forms. </p><p>ART 160: INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE </p><p>Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program, </p><p>students can: </p><p>1) Create and/or critique artistic performances: </p><p>Art 160: Introduction to Visual Culture provides an overview of </p><p>visual culture historically and in contemporary society. Objectives </p><p>include understanding: </p><p> the role of the artist </p><p> the role of the observer </p><p> the role of art in society </p><p> the role of Art 160 in the context of other general education courses </p></li><li><p>Within this context, students critique works of art based on objectives </p><p>specific to the course. </p><p>Typical assignments asks students to critique a work of art </p><p>addressing: </p><p> Form and content in visual culture </p><p> A personal critique of art work(s) utilizing the </p><p>vocabulary of the course text </p><p> Reactions to specific art works or videos about visual </p><p>culture as in-class writing assignments. </p><p>The following writing samples from Art 160 students demonstrate </p><p>their use of vocabulary and reactions to the formal elements of art: </p><p>There is a lot of negative space in each of the three drawings </p><p>although the pictures do not look empty. </p><p>The whole piece is balanced asymmetrically. </p><p>Lines descend from the rooftop and intersect with the contoured </p><p>line bordering the roof. Implied lines direct my sights starting at </p><p>the entrance, working upward to the right, then down. </p><p>The bold lines in this piece, although stylized as propaganda, are </p><p>also reminiscent of pop art. </p></li><li><p>The defined objectives encourage students to not only engage with </p><p>artwork, but they must do so in ways consistent with the process of </p><p>art criticism using its unique vocabulary and methods. Similar to </p><p>the assessed studio courses, Art 160 helps students to grapple with </p><p>specific content and subject matter while also incorporating their </p><p>own ideas and point-of-view. This, in turn, links their </p><p>understanding of how form and content interact. These written </p><p>assignments challenge students to think about visual culture in new </p><p>ways. </p><p>As stated in the Art 160 syllabus, the objective of the course is to </p><p>help students learn to be a fully informed observer, better </p><p>understand the role of the artist, and the role of art in society. </p><p>Critiquing examples of visual culture ties these objectives to the </p><p>overall goal of providing a solid general education exposure to the </p><p>world of art. </p><p>In summary, students: 1) build a critical vocabulary of formal issues </p><p>in visual culture, 2) better understand the historical context of </p><p>visual culture, and </p><p>3) gain exposure to diverse examples of contemporary visual culture. </p><p>Again, this mirrors the intent of Art Department studio courses by </p><p>developing strong critical thinking and analysis skills. </p><p>2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts </p><p>and humanities: </p></li><li><p>Art 160 explores visual culture in a way that emphasizes scope and </p><p>variety while also connecting visual culture to the humanities as a </p><p>whole. This is achieved by first building a vocabulary of terms and </p><p>providing some historical grounding. Then, visual culture is </p><p>explored one medium at a time drawing, painting, prints, camera </p><p>and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture and installation, crafts </p><p>and architecture. I each area, students are presented with </p><p>traditional, modern and postmodern examples of media. </p><p>To further highlight this connection, another student quote </p><p>explaining the impact of Art 160: Every time I see a work of art in </p><p>the library or on campus I think to myself, what is the artist trying </p><p>to get across? Before students can begin to understand the scope and </p><p>variety of visual culture, they have to learn to look. Art 160 is an </p><p>intense introduction to paying more attention to the world around </p><p>us. Students routinely indicate increased interest in the architecture, </p><p>photos, videos, and other areas of visual culture that they had taken </p><p>for granted prior to the course. </p><p>Demonstrating awareness of the scope and variety of works in the </p><p>arts and humanities is inextricably linked to helping students better </p><p>understand the relationship between the arts and other areas within </p><p>the humanities. As a result, some of the quotes from the next section </p><p>(3) relate to and resonate in the current section (2). </p><p>3) Describe the relationship between the arts and the humanities and </p><p>society: </p><p>Art 160 makes reference to a variety of other areas within the </p><p>humanities particularly theatre, literature, philosophy and </p></li><li><p>music. Beyond this, the course also connects students with history, </p><p>economics, sociology and many other disciplines. Art 160 stresses the </p><p>importance of an overall awareness of the issues in the humanities </p><p>and how they are best understood with reference to other fields of </p><p>knowledge and experience. </p><p>Quoting from a student: Before this class I had no idea that art was </p><p>such an important part of cultural history. I took for granted having </p><p>such beautiful things around me and I think this class has taught </p><p>me to have greater appreciation for different types of art. Art 160 </p><p>helps students to pay attention to the diversity of visual culture </p><p>while building a sense of context and understanding. Again, like the </p><p>studio classes, Art 160 connects with daily life a visit to the </p><p>gallery, greater attention to our architectural environment, or the </p><p>printed page as graphic design. </p><p>Beyond this, the relationship of the arts and fast-paced change in </p><p>contemporary society helps students to see the issues of the </p><p>humanities as a part of their lives. As they are exposed to </p><p>challenging course content, their definition of art, visual culture </p><p>and the humanities in general is stretched. From another student: </p><p>Reading the description I learned the artist suspended himself </p><p>above a canvas and swung over it dangling his feet to smear the </p><p>paint around. Normally Im not one to appreciate this sort of work, </p><p>but the knowledge I have gained in this class allows me to </p><p>appreciate how this can be considered art. Another student wrote: I </p><p>feel like his sculptures were an exploration of the bizarre </p><p>blended with the scary reality of a modern world. The bright colors </p><p>and crazy arrangement of ideas was very new and exciting to me. </p><p>Art 160 works in conjunction with other general education courses </p><p>in the humanities to help students better understand our individual </p><p>and collective lives and how they overlap. </p></li><li><p>FALL 2008/SPRING 2009: CATEGORY 6 ASSESSMENT OF STUDIO ART </p><p>COURSES: </p><p>ART 100: ELEMENTS AND PRINCIPLES OF ART </p><p>ART 231: MIXED MEDIA ART </p><p>275: PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Individual assessments were completed for the following studio courses: </p><p> Art 100: Elements and Principals of Art </p><p> Art 231: Mixed Media </p><p> Art 275: Photography </p><p>We have addressed the criteria for evaluation in relation to each course in </p><p>the documentation that follows. However, there are some generalizations and </p><p>explanations that pertain to all courses, and we will summarize those here: </p><p>Following the completion of Category 6 of the General Education Program, </p><p>students can: </p><p>1) Create and/or critique artistic performances: </p><p>All of the assessed studio courses are centered on the creation of art </p><p>as related to specific course objectives. Students create a number of </p><p>works throughout the semester, and these works are discussed and </p><p>evaluated in class critiques. Class discussions and critiques are </p><p>supplemented by the presentation of work from history as well as </p><p>contemporary visual examples. New artists and processes are </p><p>introduced through Power Point presentations, videos, and class </p><p>field trips. </p></li><li><p>Each of these strategies (the creation of work, the critique of work, </p><p>and the introduction of new work) reinforces the objectives set forth. </p><p>The nature of studio art courses necessitates that students make and </p><p>critique works of art. However, in this assessment, it is our goal to </p><p>illustrate that students make art in relation to specific objectives, </p><p>that achieving those objectives correlates to their understanding of </p><p>art-making, and that a broad knowledge of art history and </p><p>contemporary art helps to better their own work while also allowing </p><p>them to more articulately contextualize their work. </p><p>2) Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts </p><p>and...</p></li></ul>

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