how to terminate coaxial cable

Download How to Terminate Coaxial Cable

Post on 08-Aug-2015

70 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

How To Terminate Coaxial Cable

Cut the end of the cable off square with a set of sharp cutters. (200069 Shown.)

Place the coax in the stripper part of the combination tool, with the end flush against the side of the tool. (Or use the separate stripper.) Twirl the strip tool around the cable until the "crunching" stops. (5 to 10 turns.) Remove the combination or strip tool.

Pull off the stripped materiel. Fold back the remaining braid so that there is only one layer of foil left against the center white dielectric. Note that with quad shield cable, there may be two layers of braid and one layer of foil to fold back. When using the 200004 stripper, adjust the blade so that it cuts through the outer layer of braid and foil. This makes the "folding back" operation much

quicker and easier. If you do not get everything except the innermost layer of foil folded back, it will be very difficult to push on the connector. Untwist the black ring from the SNS connector and slide onto the cable, fat end first. Insert the cable into the SNS connector.

When inserted properly, the white insulator of the cable should be flush with the metal flange. If you cannot get the coax to go in all the way, pull it out and push it in again. Sometimes the cable catches on the inner ring. If the cable jacket is loose, you may need to kink the cable slightly in your palm while pressing it into the connector (no more than 45 degrees). Slide the ring into the connector and lay the assembly into the crimp tool. Squeeze the handle until the ring seats all the way into the connector. You should hear or feel a "click" as it pops into position. Remove the coax and connector from the crimper.

Crimp Style Connectors on RG6 Dual-Shield Cable

Cut the end of the cable off square with a set of sharp cutters. (200069 Shown.)

Open the RG6 Toggle Strip Tool and stick the coax through the hole until the end is flush with the top lip (9 mm position). Twirl the Toggle tool 6 turns clockwise, then 2 turns counterclockwise. Note: You can also use the 2Blade Rotary Stripper for this and the next step. Open the Toggle tool and push the coax through a little more until the fresh cut is at the middle (6 mm position). Twirl the Toggle tool 2 turns counterclockwise. Remove the coax from the Toggle tool. Using a pair of pliers, pull off the big piece of stripped materiel leaving the bare copper center conductor. Use the pliers to pinch a small piece of the outer jacket and pull. This will remove a "ring" of jacket leaving about 1/8" of exposed braid and foil.

With your fingers, bend all the braid back along the outside of the cable as evenly as possible. Shove the end of the cable into a crimp connector and work the cable in until the white insulator is flush with the bottom of the connector. Open the jaws of the crimper and lay the connector in the bigger slot with the edge of the connector flush with the edge of the crimper. Squeeze the handles all the way together and release. Remove the coax and connector from the crimper.

Crimp Style Connectors on RG6 Quad-Shield Cable

Cut the end of the cable off square with a set of sharp cutters. (200069 Shown.)

Open the 2-Blade Rotary Strip Tool and stick the coax through the hole until the end is flush with the lip. Twirl the stripper several turns in the direction indicated by the arrow on the tool, until the "crunching" stops.

Note that the strip tool comes set up for dual-shield cable, you will have to adjust both blades 2-3 turns "deeper" to achieve the strip shown below. Remove the coax from the Toggle tool.

Using a pair of pliers, pull off the big piece of stripped materiel leaving the bare copper center conductor.

Also pull off the smaller ring of outer jacket. Two layers of braid and one layer of foil should also come off,leaving exposed only one layer of foil.

Shove the end of the cable into a crimp connector and work the cable in until the white insulator is flush with the bottom of the connector.

This is the hardest part of installing crimp connectors on quad-shield coax. You need some way to hold the connector, keep it from spinning, not crush the easily bent "crimp" area, and yet allow the center conductor to stick out of the end. I found a little pair of Channel-Lock pliers work well.

Open the jaws of the crimper and lay the connector in the bigger slot with the edge of the connector flush with the edge of the crimper. Squeeze the handles all the way together and release. Remove the coax and connector from the crimper.

The Pressures of Pressure CrimpsA Step-by-step Guide for connecting your RG59 and RG6 Cables to a Pressure Crimp This pictorial tutorial is specifically designed for anyone who wishes to learn how to link up bulk RG59 and RG6 (Coaxial [RF] Video) Cables to F-type, BNC, or RCA connectors. Since RG59 cables are one of the most common video cables in use today, it is convenient to learn how to connect or extend your own cables for your analog Cable TV or video applications. Typically fitted with F-Pin ends (for Cable TV) or BNC ends (professional video applications), the RG59 cable has been also commonly to connect to RCA connectors. The main difference between RG6 and RG59 is that the RG6 cables have a thicker copper wire allowing better transmission of the signal. RG6 is primarily being used today for satellite and digital cable TV, where higher frequencies are required that RG59 cable cannot support.

Step 1: Identifying the Cable

Some RG59 and RG6 cables comes paired with a power cable. If this is the case, the power cable is easily identified by its dual cable structure (pictured as the red and white jacketed cable above). This distinguishes the upper cable as your A/V cable.

Separate the power cable Now that you have your from the A/V cable simply isolated coaxial cable, you by pulling the two apart. If are ready to go on to the you have trouble splitting next step. them, use a cutter and make a small incision between the cables to assist the severance.

Step 2: Making a Clean Cut

After you have identified your Make a clean cut at the Making a clean cut on Video Cable, you will need a tip of your cable with your cable will ensure a Cable Cutter. Make sure the your Cable Cutter. Do snug fit and an accurate cutter is sharp and in good not cut too far back from positioning of your cable condition to avoid any the tip to avoid a loss of

unclean cuts.

length of your cable.

into the connector.

Step 3: Setting the Stripper

Next you will need a wire stripper, which will expose the interior layers of the cable. This will allow you to gain access to the conductor and also to remove the shielding beneath the surface of the cable.

Make sure that your setting on the wire stripper matches the desired length you want the wire to be stripped. The red arrow in the picture shows the position of the setting. Simply pop out the orange X and insert it back into position to the desired setting, matching the number with the black arrow on the stripper itself. The number key on the left hand side shows the length each setting will yield.

Step 4: Stripping the Cable

Now that you have set your stripper, it is time to put your wire into the stripper. Make sure that you put your stripper on the correct way. The end of the wire should match up with the end of the stripper. Make sure that the two are on the same plane before stripping.

To strip the wire, simply rotate your Simply remove your stripper around the cable either stripper and the clockwise or counter-clockwise. A portions of the couple rotations is sufficient until you cables that have feel little to no resistance. Do not over been cut. Your cable strip your cable in case of damaging should look the conductor. Also make sure that you something like the strip enough so that you expose all the above picture. Three parts desired. identifiable layers should be present: the Cable jacket, the mesh shielding and the conductor.

Step 5: Cleaning the Cable Part 1

Peel out the mesh shielding from the

Next, you will need a precise Using the precise electrical electrical cutter. This is cutter, trim the mesh

wire to expose the aluminum shield underneath.

different from other cable shielding from the wire as cutters in that it can cut at closely to the cable jacket more angles and with much as possible. higher versatility.

Step 6: Cleaning the Cable Part 2

Now that you have removed the first layer of mesh shielding, you can continue to remove the first layer of aluminum shielding. Much like your kitchen aluminum foil, it will easily tare off.

Next repeat what you did for the first layer of mesh shielding to the second. Peel away the mesh and using the precise electrical cutter, cut away the mesh shielding to expose the second layer of aluminum shielding. This time, do not remove the second layer of aluminum shielding.

You cable should look like this now. Having removed 3 layers in all: 2 mesh shielding and 1 aluminum shielding.

Step 7: Spacing the Cable

For this step, you will Match up your cable to Push down on need a spacer which is the conical end of the the cable with necessary to separate spacer and be sure that the spacer the cable exposed from the second layer of with a twisting the layers we have just aluminum shielding motion to removed. This assists in goes into the hole of guarantee a maintaining a good fit the spacer while nice for the connector to the everything exterior to separation cable. the aluminum shielding between the remains out of the layers. hole.

Remove the spacer from the cable and examine the cable. Be careful not to hold the cable at the tip so that you will not disturb the space you have just