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  • Nano Res

    1

    Highly Stretchable, Electrically Conductive Textiles

    Fabricated from Silver Nanowires and Cupro Fabrics

    Using a Simple Dipping-Drying Method

    Hui-Wang Cui1(), Katsuaki Suganuma1, and Hiroshi Uchida2

    Nano Res., Just Accepted Manuscript • DOI: 10.1007/s12274-014-0649-y

    http://www.thenanoresearch.com on November 24 2014

    © Tsinghua University Press 2014

    Just Accepted

    This is a “Just Accepted” manuscript, which has been examined by the peer-review process and has been

    accepted for publication. A “Just Accepted” manuscript is published online shortly after its acceptance,

    which is prior to technical editing and formatting and author proofing. Tsinghua University Press (TUP)

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    which is identical for all formats of publication.

    Address correspondence to Hui-Wang Cui, email: cuihuiwang@hotmail.com.

    Nano Research DOI 10.1007/s12274-014-0649-y

  • Nano Res

    2

  • 1

    TABLE OF CONTENTS (TOC)

    Highly Stretchable, Electrically Conductive Textiles

    Fabricated from Silver Nanowires and Cupro

    Fabrics Using a Simple Dipping-Drying Method

    Hui-Wang Cui1,*, Katsuaki Suganuma1, and Hiroshi

    Uchida2

    1 Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka

    University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047,

    Japan.

    2 Institute for Polymers and Chemicals Business

    Development Center, Showa Denko K. K., 5-1 Yawata

    Kaigan Dori, Ichihara, Chiba 290-0067, Japan.

    Page Numbers. The font is

    ArialMT 16 (automatically

    inserted by the publisher)

    Highly stretchable, electrically conductive textiles were fabricated

    from silver nanowires and cupro fabrics using a simple

    dipping-drying method, that they had displayed low electrical

    resistances at 0.0047-0.0091 Ω in the range of 0%-190% strains.

    Provide the authors’ website if possible.

    Author 1, website 1

    Author 2, website 2

  • 2

    Highly Stretchable, Electrically Conductive Textiles Fabricated from Silver Nanowires and Cupro Fabrics Using a Simple Dipping-Drying Method

    Hui-Wang Cui1(), Katsuaki Suganuma1, and Hiroshi Uchida2

    1 Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan. 2 Institute for Polymers and Chemicals Business Development Center, Showa Denko K. K., 5-1 Yawata Kaigan Dori, Ichihara, Chiba

    290-0067, Japan.

    Received: day month year / Revised: day month year / Accepted: day month year (automatically inserted by the publisher)

    © Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

    ABSTRACT In this study, we combined silver nanowires and cupro fabrics together using a dipping-drying method to

    prepare electrically conductive textiles. The silver nanowires were adhered and absorbed onto microfibers to

    form electrically conductive fibers, and also filled into the gaps and spaces between/among microfibers, and

    stacked, piled together to form the electrically conductive networks, which both had given highly electrical

    conductivity to the electrically conductive textiles. The obtained electrically conductive textiles presented low

    resistance and good stretchability, e.g., 0.0047-0.0091 Ω in the range of 0%-190% strains. The obtained

    electrically conductive textiles also presented excellent flexibility, whether stretched, shrunk, or bent, they still

    kept highly, stably electrical conductivity, which can be used as smart textiles, especially in those fields

    associated with weave, electronics, biology, medicine, food, life, clothes, aviation, and military.

    KEYWORDS A. Fabrics/textiles; A. Metals; A. Smart materials; B. Electrical properties.

    Address correspondence to Hui-Wang Cui, email: cuihuiwang@hotmail.com.

    Nano Res DOI (automatically inserted by the publisher) Research Article

  • 3

    1. Introduction

    Smart textiles, a class of highly intelligent

    textiles integrated by the multi-disciplinary

    knowledge (e.g., textile, electronics, chemistry,

    physics, mechanics, biology, medicine, etc.), is based

    on the concept of biomimicry, capable of simulating

    life system, and has the dual function that can

    effectively perceive and response to various changes

    and stimuli from the environment, such as

    mechanics, heat, light, temperature, electromagnetics,

    chemicals, biological odors, and so on. Till now, a

    variety of functional smart textiles, e.g., thermostat

    textiles, physiological state telemetry textiles, solar

    textiles, shape memory textiles, waterproof and

    moisture permeable textiles, color-changing textiles,

    and E-smart textiles, have been greatly developed.

    Among them, the E-smart textiles are a kind of novel

    textiles, which is based on electronics, integrating

    some hi-tech solutions such as sensing,

    telecommunication and artificial intelligence into

    textiles. While the E-smart textile applications have

    made a limited commercial impact so far, with

    relatively small volumes of commercial products

    launched primarily in the high performance apparel

    sector, predictions for growth of this market as a

    whole are huge. As deep integration of several

    cutting-edge technologies such as micro-electronics,

    nanotechnology, and biotechnology, E-smart textiles

    are one of the most dynamic and fast growing

    sectors and offers huge potential [1-2].

    How to prepare electrically conductive textiles

    (also called electrically conductive fibers) is the key

    to produce E-smart textiles. Coating [3], depositing

    [4], spinning [5], printing [6], synthesizing [7],

    dipping [8], and solution growing [9] methods have

    been used widely to fabricate electrically conductive

    textiles from the conductive polymers (e.g.,

    polypyrrole [10], polyaniline [11], the mixture of

    poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and

    poly(4-styrenesulfonate) [12]), metal particles (e.g.,

    silver [13], copper [14], nickel [15], aluminum [16],

    zinc [17]), and carbon fillers (e.g., graphite

    nanoplatelets [18], carbon nanotube [19]). About the

    silver based smart textiles, silver particles are often

    used. For example, Xue et al produced silver

    nanoparticles on cotton fibers by reduction of

    [Ag(NH3)2]+ complex with glucose, and the silver

    nanoparticles formed dense coating around the

    fibers rendering the intrinsic insulating cotton

    textiles conductive [20]. Paul et al printed a

    polyurethane paste on to a woven textile to create a

    smooth, high surface energy interface layer, and

    subsequently printed a silver paste on top of this

    interface layer to provide a conductive track, which

    was then encapsulated with another layer of

    polyurethane paste so that the silver track was

    protected from abrasion and creasing, forming the

    electrodes [21, 22]. Apparently, the usage of silver

    nanowires (AgNWs), which are with large aspect

    ratio and can present higher flexibility than silver

    particles [23-25], to fabricate smart textiles have been

    seldom reported. Therefore, in this study, we

    combined the AgNWs and cupro fabrics together

    using a dipping-drying method to prepare

    electrically conductive textiles [Figure 1(a)]. The

    AgNWs were adhered and absorbed onto

    microfibers to form electrically conductive fibers,

    and also filled into the gaps and spaces

    between/among microfibers, and stacked, piled

    together to form the electrically conductive networks,

    which both had given highly electrical conductivity

    to the electrically conductive textiles.

    2. Experimental

    2.1. Samples

    AgNWs were synthesized in a large scale

    according to the previously reported polyol

    procedures [26, 27]. They were ≥60 μm, even 100

    μm in length, the diameter was about 60 nm, and

    dispersed in ethanol to form a 0.5% suspension

    solution [Figure 1(a)]. The textile (100 mm×100 mm

    × 250 μm) was a cellulosic product, named

    BEMCOTTM M-3 cupro fabric (Asahi Kasei Fibers

    Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) [Figure 1(a)].

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