hayao miyazaki

Download Hayao Miyazaki

Post on 13-Mar-2016

214 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

text image

TRANSCRIPT

  • Hayao Miyazaki is regarded by

    many people as the world's greatest maker of animated

    films. In 2003, his film "Spirited Away" won the Academy Award for best animated feature.Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a

    no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of

    admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego.

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for

    instance, a no-show at the Oscar

    In 2003, his film

    "Spirited Away" won the Academy Award for best animated

    feature.Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave

    publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he

    addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San

    Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th

    Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the

    Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention

    to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave public-ity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar cer-

    emony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con

    In- ternational, a comics,

    Mr. Miyazaki

    does not crave

    public-ity. He

    was, for

    in-stance,

    a no-show

    at the Oscar

    ceremony. But on July

    24, 2009, he addressed a

    room full of admirers at

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave

    publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24,

    2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to

    be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he

    addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not

    crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a

    comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he

    addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for

    instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held

    in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th

    Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar

    ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr.

    Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was

    Mr. Mi-yazaki does not crave publicity. He was,

    for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a

    comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he

    addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th

    Comic-

    H

    Hayao Miyazaki is regarded by many people as the world's greatest maker of animated films. In 2003, his film "Spirited Away" won the Academy Award for best animated feature.

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego.

    The next day he received the Japan Prize of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, awarded annually to a person who has brought the world closer to Japan. And that July 28, in Beverly Hills, he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - the

    day after the United States premiere, in Hollywood, of his "Ponyo," about a 5-year-old boy and a goldfish princess in a world gone awry.

    Already a hit in many countries, "Ponyo," in an English-language version, with Tina Fey and Matt Damon among those providing the voices, was released by Walt Disney Studios on Aug. 14, 2009.

    At the age of 68, with almost 20 features to his credit, Mr. Miyazaki has become a beacon for those who believe that animation has a special power to tell stories with universal appeal. "He celebrates the quiet moments," said John Lasseter, the chief creative officer of Pixar and Disney Animation Studios, in enumerating traits that make Mr. Miyazaki "one of the most original" filmmakers ever.

    Mr. Miyazaki's work has often combined computer animation with traditional techniques and has provided inspiration for films like the "Toy Story" installments, "Cars" and "Up."

    Mr. Miyazaki roots are in both manga and anime (comic books and animated films). Starting with his 1997 epic, "Princess Mononoke," he has used computer-generated imagery in his movies.

    The conscious sense of mystery is the core of Mr. Miyazaki's art. Spend enough time in his world and you may find your perception of your own world refreshed, as it might be by a similarly intensive immersion in the oeuvre of Ansel Adams, J. M. W. Turner or Monet. After a while, certain vistas - a rolling meadow dappled with flowers and shadowed by high cumulus clouds, a range of rocky foothills rising toward snow-capped peaks, the fading

    light at the edge of a forest - deserve to be called Miyazakian.

    Hayao Miyazaki is regarded by many people as the world's greatest maker of animated films. In 2003, his film "Spirited Away" won the Academy Award for best animated feature.

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the Oscar ceremony. But on July 24, 2009, he addressed a room full of admirers at the 40th Comic-Con International, a comics, fantasy and film convention to be held in San Diego. The next day he received the Japan Prize of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, awarded annually to a person who has brought the world closer to Japan. And that July 28, in Beverly

    Hills, he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - the day after the United States premiere, in Hollywood, of his "Ponyo," about a 5-year-old boy and a goldfish princess in a world gone awry.

    Already a hit in many countries, "Ponyo," in an English-language version, with Tina Fey and Matt Damon among those providing the voices, was released by Walt Disney Studios on Aug. 14, 2009.

    At the age of 68, with almost 20 features to his credit, Mr. Miyazaki has become a beacon for those who believe that animation has a special power to tell stories with universal appeal. "He celebrates the quiet moments," said John Lasseter, the chief creative officer of Pixar and Disney Animation

    Studios, in enumerating traits that make Mr. Miyazaki "one of the most original" filmmakers ever.

    Mr. Miyazaki's work has often combined computer animation with traditional techniques and has provided inspiration for films like the "Toy Story" installments, "Cars" and "Up."

    Mr. Miyazaki roots are in both manga and anime (comic books and animated films). Starting with his 1997 epic, "Princess Mononoke," he has used computer-generated imagery in his movies.

    The conscious sense of mystery is the core of Mr. Miyazaki's art. Spend enough time in his world and you may find your perception of your own world refreshed, as it might be by a similarly intensive immersion in the oeuvre of Ansel Adams, J. M. W. Turner or Monet. After a while, certain vistas - a rolling meadow dappled with flowers and shadowed by high cumulus clouds, a range of rocky foothills rising toward snow-capped peaks, the fading light at the edge of a forest - deserve to be called Miyazakian.

    Hayao Miyazaki is regarded by many people as the world's greatest maker of animated films. In 2003, his film "Spirited Away" won the Academy Award for best animated feature.

    Mr. Miyazaki does not crave publicity. He was, for instance, a no-show at the O

Recommended

View more >