geschke/british literature introduction to the renaissance the renaissance 1485-1660 part ii

Download Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance THE RENAISSANCE 1485-1660 Part II

Post on 16-Dec-2015

214 views

Category:

Documents

2 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance THE RENAISSANCE 1485-1660 Part II
  • Slide 2
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Succession of the Throne Elizabeth I Henry VIIIs daughter by his second wife, Anne Boleyn Queen from 1558- 1603 Only twenty-five when she came to the throne strong national unity and triumphant cultural achievement
  • Slide 3
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Queen Elizabeth I Had a sharp intellect and an excellent Renaissance education Encouraged literary and artistic developments Clever diplomat and a shrew, at times even ruthless, politician Promoted peace and prosperity by steering a moderate religious course between Protestant extremism and the yielding to Catholicism
  • Slide 4
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Queen Elizabeth I Became an expert in foreign affairs used her unmarried status to benefit England Englands victory in 1588 over the Spanish Armada (the strongest naval force of the age) marked the culmination of Elizabeths authority in a country that had become, in less than a century, one of the most powerful in the world
  • Slide 5
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Literary Achievement Sir Philip Sidney 1554-1586 Living embodiment of the ideal Renaissance gentleman Known for his political ideas, military prowess, personal charm and literary ability
  • Slide 6
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Literary Achievement Edmund Spenser 1552-1599 Saw himself as a scholar-poet The Faerie Queene dedicated to Queen Elizabeth celebrates and assesses the values and achievements of her reign
  • Slide 7
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Literary Achievement Drama Greatest and most distinctive achievement of Elizabethan literature Elizabethan drama grew from a fusion of native English and classical traditions The triumph of Elizabethan drama is a result of the triumph of dramatically spoken English Elizabethan stagecraft was rudimentary and sketchy
  • Slide 8
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Literary Achievement Public Theaters first public theater erected in Shoreditch, an area just outside the London city limits, in 1576 Others were soon built in Southwark across the river Thames The Globe Home theater of Shakespeares company
  • Slide 9
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 10
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 11
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 12
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 13
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 14
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 15
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 16
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Globe
  • Slide 17
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Public Theaters All walks of life made up the audiences Nobility given a special seat right on stage Sophisticated (i.e. law students) would have bought a seat under the roofs in the gallery Less well-off would fill the pit Would eat, drink, hiss, catcall, and applaud
  • Slide 18
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes The most striking feature of Elizabethan artistic taste is a delight in elaborate pattern and complicated ornament fantastically decorated gowns intricate designs of Elizabethan buildings and gardens in musical forms such as the madrigal poetic forms like the sonnet or the sestina
  • Slide 19
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gowns
  • Slide 20
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gowns
  • Slide 21
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gowns
  • Slide 22
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gowns
  • Slide 23
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gowns
  • Slide 24
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Architecture
  • Slide 25
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Architecture
  • Slide 26
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Architecture
  • Slide 27
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gardens
  • Slide 28
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gardens
  • Slide 29
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gardens
  • Slide 30
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan Taste and Attitudes: Gardens
  • Slide 31
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan World Picture Elizabethans viewed the world as a vast, unified, hierarchical order, or Great Chain of Being, created by God Every existing being or thing was ranked within a category in the chain Categories were ranked by the attributes of their members, from the lowest group (all matter and no spirit) to the highest group (all spirit and no matter). Inanimate things Plant and animal kingdoms Human beings (above animals because the possession of souls and free will)
  • Slide 32
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan World Picture As each group had its place in the chain, so each member had its place within the group Animals Lion highest Oyster lowest Metals Gold highest Lead lowest Plants Rose highest
  • Slide 33
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Elizabethan World Picture This perfect order allowed for the doctrine of correspondences Gold analogous to the oak (greatest of trees) or to the sun (first among stars) The lion could represent a king or queen (head of a nation) A rose could represent God As a result, Elizabethan writers had a wealth of symbolic relationships, references, and allusions
  • Slide 34
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Jacobean Era James I 1603-1625 Cousin of Elizabeth Already King of Scotland Son of Elizabeths former archenemy, Mary, Queen of Scots
  • Slide 35
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Jacobean Era The reign of James I initiated a time of deep religious and political unrest in England James I was an intelligent but morose man who possessed none of Elizabeths instincts for practical politics During James I reign, the first group of English Puritans came to America because they did not feel free to practice their dissenting beliefs in England The House of Commons asserted its growing power against the Crown and also gained the support of the people by refusing to vote taxes
  • Slide 36
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Jacobean Era Deep philosophical and intellectual changes were beginning to undermine faith in the older Elizabethan world view Copernicus (1473-1543) and Galileo (1564- 1642) argued that the sun, not the earth, was at the center of the universe and that there might even be a plurality or infinity of worlds These and other scientific investigations called into question the very basis of the divinely ordered, hierarchical universe
  • Slide 37
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance The Jacobean Era Copernicus 1473-1543 Galileo 1564-1642
  • Slide 38
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Disruption and Change 1625-1660 Charles I Son of James I Took over the throne in 1625 Lasted until 1649
  • Slide 39
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Disruption and Change 1625-1660 England was well on its way to civil war Causes were both political and religious The Puritan movement had developed into a powerful enemy of the Anglican establishment Charles I tried to crack down on organized religious protest He was met with violent opposition
  • Slide 40
  • Geschke/British Literature Introduction to The Renaissance Disruption and Change 1625-1660 Civil War (continued) In Parliament, the lawyers and landlords who controlled the House of Commons withheld more and more funds from the executive functions of government Charles responded by trying to rule without the support of Parliament

Recommended

View more >