From Social What to Social WOW! How to design social user experiences that matter!

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<p>UKI Social for CAMMS Top Gun</p> <p>From Social What to Social WOW!Designing Social Experiences that MatterHeath McCarthyIBM WW Social Architect Leader</p> <p>Toronto, June 6-7 2016Welcome1</p> <p>Social Adoption Framework</p> <p>DEFINE VALUEDESIGN EXPEREINCELAUNCH</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Ginni Rometti, IBM CEO, Decided to re-focus on client experience, re-focus on DesignIn 2012 nominated Phil Gilbert as General Manager IBM Design to re-establish IBM DesignMission: Create a sustainable culture of Design at IBM - across all of IBM. Transform IBM through design into a company that creates products and services with great, iconic user experiences that our customers and clients love to buy and use. Time horizon: 2020 / 2025</p> <p>When Phil started establishing IBM Design in 2012: 1 designer to 60 developersToday (March 2015): 100 of 300 critical projects staffed with designers, practicing IBM Design Thinking, using Design LanguageRatio designer to developers there: 1:15 Target for enterprise projects 1:10 or 1:12, for mobile projects: 1:3</p> <p>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -IBM Design: Re-established in 2012grounded in IBMs heritage of great, iconic Design (Paul Rand, Richard Sapper, Eliot Noyes, Ray and Charles Eames, ) that started in 1956 by CEO Thomas Watson Jr. (hired first designer: Eliot Noyes, designer of Selectric typewriter)Standing on these shoulders now building a design program for the 21st century: resurrect a sustainable culture of designMission: Transform IBM through design into a company that creates products and services with great, iconic user experiences that our customers and clients love to buy and use. </p> <p>- - - CONTINUE ON NEXT SLIDE - - -</p> <p>PeopleIBM Design includes all designers, and we all operate from the foundation of IBM Design Thinking. Just over 1,000 Designers globally... about 2/3 focused on our products, and about 1/3 focused on working directly with clients (via IBMiX). Both groups are growing, and we will be adding a couple hundred in 2015 alone across IBM, and around the world (350 designers added in the past 2 years). </p> <p>PlacesIBM Studios are where our IBM Designers work, all around the world. So IBM Design has studios in more than 20 locations. Every Studio is hiring... the work that is done in the Studio varies from city to city. For example, product design happens primarily in some Studios, while design for clients happens in many more of them.September 2014: Opened IBM Studio Boeblingen. </p> <p>PracticesWe need to be presenting IBM Design as a unified approach to design, the basis of which is IBM Design Thinking. There are variants to how we implement our common design framework depending on whether we are designing for our products, for our clients, or for communications... but the common approach unifies all these aspects of design.</p> <p>People + Places + Practices = Outcomes</p> <p>4</p> <p>Playbacks align your team, stakeholders, and clients around the user value you will deliver, rather than project line itemsSponsor Users help you design social experiences for real target users, rather than imagined needsHills focus your project on big (but attainable) problems and outcomes for users, not just a list of featuresIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Prototype</p> <p>Evaluate</p> <p>Understand</p> <p>ExploreUnderstand and develop empathy for usersExplore potential solutions for your users problemsPrototype ideas as concrete experiencesEvaluate and decide whether to move forward with an idea or generate alternate solutionsIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONUnderstand users and their needsExplore solutions using ESSPrototype the key solutions Evaluate their impact and applicability</p> <p>6</p> <p>Using design artifactsCreative and collaborative problem-solving</p> <p>Stakeholder MapEmpathy MapScenario MapWireframeTechnical PrototypeFeedback GridPrioritization GridStory Map</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Keys for Designing Social Experiences8</p> <p>Prototype</p> <p>Evaluate</p> <p>Understand</p> <p>ExploreIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONUnderstand users and their needsExplore solutions using ESSPrototype the key solutions Evaluate their impact and applicability</p> <p>9</p> <p>Strategies for SuccessTargets of IBM Design Thinking </p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONBusinesses use social capabilities for business outcomes. Social software enables business users to leverage social capabilities to:Support initiatives that are important to the organize. Initiatives are top down, sometimes organization-wide directives that require participation of many people and various roles. Social capabilities help the people support and achieve the goals of the initiative. Social capabilities are themselves services available to all employees and often take on the characteristics of the software that enables them. For example, social collaboration is enabled by email, teamsites, libraries and enterprise file sharing.Many business processes in the organization can be impacted by the use of social capabilities whereby social software enablers are integrated into or extend the toolset currently in place to facilitate the processNew social business processes have emerged whereby value comes from using new technologies in novel ways to support social capabilities</p> <p>Agility, Resilience, Efficiency, EffectivenessInnovation, Engagement</p> <p>10</p> <p>Social is About Relationships</p> <p>Historically, IBM has tended to only focus its research and its product development on buyers and implementers.</p> <p>But what IBM Design Thinking asks and enables us to do is to also focus our efforts on the end users those people who actually interact with our products on a minute-by-minute basis. </p> <p>12</p> <p>Stakeholder Mapping</p> <p>Cluster, circle, and label related groupings draw arrows between them</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Were going to do that by working-through an exercise known as an AS-IS SCENARIO MAP. (Sometimes these are called Journey Maps, or Experience Maps.)</p> <p>[EXPLAIN THE MAPS STRUCTURE]</p> <p>The point here is to focus on the reality of the CURRENT situation for the user. Be honest. Dont sugar-coat. Keep it focused on the users CURRENT experience. </p> <p>Remember that interviews shouldnt be your only source of user research. Actually observing your users at their work in the field is incredibly valuable and insightful!</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Prototype</p> <p>Evaluate</p> <p>Understand</p> <p>ExploreIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONUnderstand users and their needsExplore solutions using ESSPrototype the key solutions Evaluate their impact and applicability</p> <p>18</p> <p>Big Idea Vignettes</p> <p> 2015 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Empathy MapDraw three intersecting lines, and illustrate the face of the persona in the middle. Fillin with writing or sticky notes: what theuser thinks (expectations and reactions), sees (environment and interface), says (quotes), does (actions), feels (values), and hears (instructions or feedback) duringthe experience. At the bottom, list pains (frustrations and obstacles) and gains (goals and strategies). </p> <p>ScenarioPost a row of sticky notes on a wall representing the steps of a users as-is workflow. Beneath each step, create a column of color-coded sticky notes representing questions and comments relating to that step. For comments, consider the dimensions of the Empathy Map at each step, as well as technologies and context. Once questions are answered, post comments over them. </p> <p>20</p> <p>HillsAbout a user or specific classes of usersA user-centered solution that solves a clearly defined problemDescribe near-term work that can be taken within this release or over a finite, identified set of releases</p> <p>So with those two foundational definitions in mind, here are three main points about Hills. </p> <p>Hills are always about about a user or specific classes of usersHills are always about a user-centered solution that solves a clearly defined problemHills are always about short-term work that can be taken within your current release or over a finite, identified set of releases</p> <p>Prototype</p> <p>Evaluate</p> <p>Understand</p> <p>ExploreIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONUnderstand users and their needsExplore solutions using ESSPrototype the key solutions Evaluate their impact and applicability</p> <p>22</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p> <p>Storyboarding is a really effective and efficient way to expose misunderstanding, validate or invalidate assumptions, confirm or build alignment, and converge many ideas together. </p> <p>Prototype</p> <p>Evaluate</p> <p>Understand</p> <p>ExploreIBM Design ThinkingDesigning the Social Experience</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONUnderstand users and their needsExplore solutions using ESSPrototype the key solutions Evaluate their impact and applicability</p> <p>24</p> <p>Social Adoption Framework</p> <p>DEFINE VALUEDESIGN EXPEREINCELAUNCH</p> <p> 2016 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION</p>