Equal Opportunities Unique Experiences

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Equal Opportunities Unique Experiences. Ashley Holben Project Coordinator Mobility International USA. Individualized and Universal Approaches to Inclusive Study Abroad. Joanna Boval Director Office for Students with Disabilities, UC San Diego. Jake Robinson Student UC San Diego. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>INDIVIDUALIZED AND UNIVERSAL APPROACHES TO INCLUSIVE STUDY ABROADEqual OpportunitiesUnique ExperiencesAshley HolbenProject CoordinatorMobility International USAJoanna BovalDirectorOffice for Students with Disabilities, UC San DiegoJake RobinsonStudentUC San Diego</p></li><li><p>Whats the Buzz?The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)International treaty establishing a baseline standard of disability rights. 147 countries have ratified.</p><p>Impact on Education AbroadJoining [the CRPD] will also expand opportunities for American students with disabilities, who need to be able to study abroad to prepare themselves to compete in the global economy. John Kerry, U.S. Secretary of State</p></li><li><p>Whats the Buzz?National Association on College and University Attorneys (NACUA) Report on Disability in International ExchangeU.S. colleges and universities should strongly consider designing and administering study abroad programs as if the ADA and Section 504 apply to them.</p><p>#GenerationStudyAbroadCampus internationalization initiativesRequired experiences abroadDiversity commitments</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising:Balancing Goals and Needs</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising: Balancing Goals and Needs</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising: Balancing Goals and NeedsPlanting SeedsHow to Get SWD Thinking About Study Abroad</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising: Balancing Goals and NeedsPlanting SeedsHow to Get SWD Thinking About Study AbroadCreating PartnershipsUC Education Abroad Program</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising: Balancing Goals and NeedsPlanting SeedsHow to Get SWD Thinking About Study AbroadCreating PartnershipsUC Education Abroad ProgramPlanning in AdvanceAttitude Can Conquer Many Obstacles</p></li><li><p>Individualized Advising: Balancing Goals and NeedsPlanting SeedsHow to Get SWD Thinking About Study AbroadCreating PartnershipsUC Education Abroad ProgramPlanning in AdvanceAttitude Can Conquer Many ObstaclesLearning for the FutureReflecting on Individual Experiences to Create Best Practices</p></li><li><p>Student Voice:Jakes Semester at Sea</p></li><li><p>Oworabong, Ghana</p></li><li><p>Accessibility was limited</p></li><li><p>Keys to SuccessFlexibility is keyThe why not? approachAdventure-driven motivation</p></li><li><p>Inclusive Exchange: Making the World within Reach</p></li><li><p>10 Steps to a UD Exchange ProgramTrain staff</p><p>Share lists of accepted participants</p><p>Create essential program requirements</p></li><li><p>10 Steps to a UD Exchange ProgramExpand housing options</p><p>Allow early arrival options</p><p>Offer group insurance coverage</p><p>Connect to local resources/community</p></li><li><p>10 Steps to a UD Exchange ProgramProgram and course flexibility</p><p>Built-in funding supports</p><p>Arrange for communication</p></li><li><p>ResourcesMobility International USA www.miusa.org Resources for students &amp; professionals, stories, tip sheets, outreach materials, videos, social mediaNACUA Notes - counsel.cua.edu/fedlaw/nacuanotesdisabilityabroad.cfm Federal Disability Laws: Do They Translate to Study Abroad Programs?Beyond the Americans with Disabilities ActPublication by NASPA (2014) with chapter on Study Abroad Inclusive Opportunities</p></li><li><p>Thank You!Questions for us?Ashley HolbenProject CoordinatorMobility International USAaholben@miusa.org Joanna BovalDirectorOffice for Students with Disabilities, UC San Diegojboval@ucsd.edu Jake RobinsonStudentUC San Diegojrob8188@gmail.com </p><p>International treaty establishing a baseline standard of disability rights in the countries that ratify it. </p><p>**Universal design starts with polices and decisions that benefit not just people with disabilities, but a broad range of diverse participants.The time put in upfront to rethink what makes a program inclusive benefits more than just participants with disabilities. It also means less need for retrofitting or scrambling to put in place individual accommodations later on. Universal design encourages flexibility and proactiveplanning, andbonus: you will be protecting yourself from surprisesby creating a program that is suited for all.Train staff and volunteers on how to respond to inquiries about disability and diversity policy and how to use appropriate and respectful language.Give lists of accepted participants, if relevant, to equity offices, disability services and counseling centers on campus so they can know and talk with their clients about going abroad.Create essential program requirements that shares more details about the program so everyone can better assess for themselves if it is a good fit or not.Set up more housing options, such as ground floor, single occupancy, wheelchair accessible, and close to public transportation, so its available when needed.Allow early arrival options to allow time to settle in and work out any unexpected challenges for any participants who may need it.Offer group insurance coverage that does not exclude pre-existing or mental health conditions or medications coverage, and providing upfront costs for participants to use for counseling, or related appointments that support them in maintaining their health, that can be reimbursed by the participants later.Connect in advance to local resources, including disability or diverse organizations, peers, and community groups and English-speaking doctors, counselors, and tutors so questions can be directed to people who can more specifically respond.Set up academic options, if relevant, that have pass and fail coursework, reduced course loads, pre-registration, flexibility in scheduling/breaks, lecture notes available to all participants, and course materials in universally accessible online formats.Build in funding supports by recognizing that with diversity come unexpected or less common requests that may cost, such as sign language interpreters, braille materials, sighted guides or orientation and mobility training, personal assistants, social mentors, assistive technology replacement or repairs, etc.Arrange for communications whether it be more thorough and repeated communications about health, safety and security resources; availability of Internet and other communications for accessing remote support; or staff checking in more regularly during a program with participants.</p><p>*Universal design starts with polices and decisions that benefit not just people with disabilities, but a broad range of diverse participants.The time put in upfront to rethink what makes a program inclusive benefits more than just participants with disabilities. It also means less need for retrofitting or scrambling to put in place individual accommodations later on. Universal design encourages flexibility and proactiveplanning, andbonus: you will be protecting yourself from surprisesby creating a program that is suited for all.Train staff and volunteers on how to respond to inquiries about disability and diversity policy and how to use appropriate and respectful language.Give lists of accepted participants, if relevant, to equity offices, disability services and counseling centers on campus so they can know and talk with their clients about going abroad.Create essential program requirements that shares more details about the program so everyone can better assess for themselves if it is a good fit or not.Set up more housing options, such as ground floor, single occupancy, wheelchair accessible, and close to public transportation, so its available when needed.Allow early arrival options to allow time to settle in and work out any unexpected challenges for any participants who may need it.Offer group insurance coverage that does not exclude pre-existing or mental health conditions or medications coverage, and providing upfront costs for participants to use for counseling, or related appointments that support them in maintaining their health, that can be reimbursed by the participants later.Connect in advance to local resources, including disability or diverse organizations, peers, and community groups and English-speaking doctors, counselors, and tutors so questions can be directed to people who can more specifically respond.Set up academic options, if relevant, that have pass and fail coursework, reduced course loads, pre-registration, flexibility in scheduling/breaks, lecture notes available to all participants, and course materials in universally accessible online formats.Build in funding supports by recognizing that with diversity come unexpected or less common requests that may cost, such as sign language interpreters, braille materials, sighted guides or orientation and mobility training, personal assistants, social mentors, assistive technology replacement or repairs, etc.Arrange for communications whether it be more thorough and repeated communications about health, safety and security resources; availability of Internet and other communications for accessing remote support; or staff checking in more regularly during a program with participants.</p><p>*Universal design starts with polices and decisions that benefit not just people with disabilities, but a broad range of diverse participants.The time put in upfront to rethink what makes a program inclusive benefits more than just participants with disabilities. It also means less need for retrofitting or scrambling to put in place individual accommodations later on. Universal design encourages flexibility and proactiveplanning, andbonus: you will be protecting yourself from surprisesby creating a program that is suited for all.Train staff and volunteers on how to respond to inquiries about disability and diversity policy and how to use appropriate and respectful language.Give lists of accepted participants, if relevant, to equity offices, disability services and counseling centers on campus so they can know and talk with their clients about going abroad.Create essential program requirements that shares more details about the program so everyone can better assess for themselves if it is a good fit or not.Set up more housing options, such as ground floor, single occupancy, wheelchair accessible, and close to public transportation, so its available when needed.Allow early arrival options to allow time to settle in and work out any unexpected challenges for any participants who may need it.Offer group insurance coverage that does not exclude pre-existing or mental health conditions or medications coverage, and providing upfront costs for participants to use for counseling, or related appointments that support them in maintaining their health, that can be reimbursed by the participants later.Connect in advance to local resources, including disability or diverse organizations, peers, and community groups and English-speaking doctors, counselors, and tutors so questions can be directed to people who can more specifically respond.Set up academic options, if relevant, that have pass and fail coursework, reduced course loads, pre-registration, flexibility in scheduling/breaks, lecture notes available to all participants, and course materials in universally accessible online formats.Build in funding supports by recognizing that with diversity come unexpected or less common requests that may cost, such as sign language interpreters, braille materials, sighted guides or orientation and mobility training, personal assistants, social mentors, assistive technology replacement or repairs, etc.Arrange for communications whether it be more thorough and repeated communications about health, safety and security resources; availability of Internet and other communications for accessing remote support; or staff checking in more regularly during a program with participants.</p><p>*</p></li></ul>