Energy & Power Unit 5, Lesson 1 Explanation © 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEM  Center for Teaching and Learning™

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  • Energy & PowerUnit 5, Lesson 1Explanation 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • The Unit Big IdeaThe designed world is the product of a design process, which provides ways to turn resources - materials, tools and machines, people, information, energy, capital, and time - into products and services. 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • The Lesson Big IdeaAdvancements in the processing and controlling of energy resources have been an enabling factor in the development of technology. 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • First Law of ThermodynamicsEnergy cannot be created or destroyed, it can be converted from one form to another.For example, the gasoline (chemical energy) in a car is converted to heat (thermal energy) and movement (mechanical energy).

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Forms of EnergyThe major forms of energy are:Thermal Radiant (light)Electrical Mechanical Chemical Nuclear

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Forms of EnergyDefinedThermal energy: or heat, is the vibration and movement of the atoms and molecules within substancesRadiant energy (light): is electromagnetic energy that travels in transverse wavesElectrical energy: energy made available by the flow of electric charge through a conductor.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Forms of EnergyDefinedMechanical energy: energy stored in the movement of objectsChemical energy: is energy stored in the bonds of atoms and molecules. Biomass, petroleum, natural gas, and coal are examples of stored chemical energy. Nuclear energy: is energy stored in the nucleus of an atom the energy that holds the nucleus together. 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Power PlantsPower plants generate electricity from various energy resources. These resources can be classified as:

    Renewable Non Renewable Solar Fossil Fuels Wind Uranium Water

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Non RenewableNon renewable resources include fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas. These nonrenewable resources are forms of chemical energy created from natural occurring elements.Fossil fuels provide around 66% of the worlds electrical power and meet 95% of the worlds total energy demands.Oil and Coal power plants produce harmful environmental emissions.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Non RenewableNuclear power is also considered a non renewable energy resource.Nuclear power is generated using uranium and produces around 11% of the worlds energy needs.The heat required to produce steam, which turns the turbine is created using a process called fission, where atoms split and release energy in the form of heat.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Electricity GenerationThe following image represents a typical fossil fuel power plant.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • 2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • RenewableRenewable energy resources include water, solar and wind. Hydroelectric power plants take advantage of the downward flow of water to turn the blades of a turbine. Wind works similarly, the wind blows and turns the blades of the turbine. Solar power plants generate electricity by converting the radiant energy from sunlight to electrical using specific materials within the solar panel.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Power SystemsMust have:Source of energyProcessLoadExample: Wind Power SystemSource of energy: the windProcess: spinning generatorLoad: homes the wind generator is connected to

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Energy Flow DiagramsThe flow of energy within any system can be documented using energy flow diagrams. Energy flow diagrams show what is happening to a particular type of energy as it is used or changed in some process or situation. One type of energy flow diagrams are called Sankey Diagrams.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Energy FlowDiagram ExampleFlow diagram depicting the changes in energy within an automobile.Retrieved from: http://www.cleanmpg.com/photos/data/522/HCH2SP_DiagramHybridCivic.JPG

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Energy FlowDiagram ExampleSankey Diagrams show the type of energy put into a system and the energy conversion, including wasted energy, usually in the form of heat.Retrieved from: http://www.gcsescience.com/pen20-energy-efficiency.htm

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • Energy FlowDiagram ExampleSankey Diagram for US Energy consumption in 2008.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

  • ReflectionWhat would an energy flow diagram of a coal power plant look like?Create an energy flow diagram (following either the first example or a Sankey diagram). Display your diagram in the classroom.

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    2011 International Technology and Engineering Educators Association, STEMCenter for Teaching and Learning Foundations of Technology

    International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*International Technology Education AssociationCenter to Advance the Teaching of Technology & ScienceEngineering byDesignSlide #*

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