eidswick 1982] rubik's cube engagement calendar 1982

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Rubi ks QeTM ENGAGEMENT 10 Q')AL ENDAR

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By Jack Eidswick

CHRISTMAS CROSS CANDY STRIPELjLJ

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RUB K'S CUBE IS A TRADEMARK OF IDEAL TOY CORPORATION WHICH IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH THIS BOOK

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CALENDAR

ENGAGEMENT 1By Jack Eidswick

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I and books South Bend, Indiana

Magic Ribbons. h, (12x12") :ornelis Escher

To Eric

Acknowledgments: Thanks to all who worked on the concept and production of this unique engagement calendar; especially Dennis Thurlow of TAB Books for dates, Patty Walsh for art and design, and Emil Krause for his editorial assistance.

About the author Jack Eidswick Jack Eidswick, a Mathematics Professor at the University of Nebraska has devised numerous geometric puzzles with the Rubik Cube and is the author of "Rubik's Cube Made Easy,*". which is the first solution book that explains the mathematics behind the cube.*Rubik's Cube Made Easy, by Jack Eidswick; Peace Press; 48pp., illustrated.

Study for the lithograph Belvedere. Pencil, (5x5") Maurits Cornelis Escher, 1958.

DECEMBER 81 JANUARY 30"God does not play dice."-Albert Einstein.

Wednesday

Sud7Sunday

31ThursdayNEW YEAR'S DAY

28Monday

1Friday

29Tuesday

2SaturdayIsaac Asimov, 1920

JANUARYJohn Horton Conway can solve the cube behind his back with only a few "peeks."

6Wednesday

3SundayJ.R.R. Tolkein, 1892

7Thursday

4Monday

8Friday

5TuesdayAlan Watts, 1915

9Saturday

l

i I

DOTS

JANUARY"...all that can be truly said of the sense-organism is, that, under different circumstances they produce different sensations and perceptions."-ErnstMach. The Analysis of ensation. 1914.

13Wednesday

14SundayThursdayMARTIN LUTHER KING DAY

11Monday

15Friday1.

Edward Teller, 1908

12TuesdayI

16Saturday

JANUARY"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."-Sherlock Holmes. Sign of Four.

20Wednesday

17SundayBen Franklin, 1706

21Thursday

18Monday

22Friday

19Tuesday

Saturday

Jack Eidswick, 1934

JANUARYThe human heart beat is 0.5-2 sec; a Sclar Day is 8.64x104 sec; a Lunar Cycle is 1.2x102 sec; a Sideral Year is 3.2x10' sec; the Gleissberg Cycle (80 yr sunspots) is 2.4x108 seac; the Zero Check Cycle is 5.42x10f sec; the Orbit Cycle is 2.9x1012 sec; a Galactic Cycle is 7.04x10' sec: the Universal Cycle is 6.3x101' sec.

27WednesdayLewis Carroll, 1832

24Sunday

1Thursday

28

25NIMondayJoseph-Louis Lagrange, 1736

29StFriday

26Tuesday

Saturday

JANUARY FEBRUARY 3"Of which we cannot speak we have to remain silent." - Ludwig Wittgenstein. Tractatus.

Wednesday

31Sunday

4Thursday

1MondayGROUND HOG DAY Punxatawney, Penna.

5Friday

2Tuesday

6SaturdayFirt Moon Landing, ION

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AF

T

R T

E N DUPSWINGER 1

FEBRUARY

1) No body in a place no larger than itself is moving. 2) Every body is a body in a place no larger than itself. 3) Therefore, no body is moving.-Zeno's Paradox No. 1 syllogism by Charles Pierce, Collected Papers c.1912.

10Wednesday

7Sunday

11ThursdayLINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY Thomas Edison, 1847

8MondayJules Verne, 1828

12FridayAbraham Lincoln, 1809Charles Darwin, 1809

9Tuesday

13SaturdayGalilei Galileo, 1564

FEBRUARY"When the bishops (Council of Ncea) took their places upon the thrones they were 318; when they rose to be called over, it appeared that they were 319; so when they approached the last of the series he immediately turned into the likeness of his next neighbor ... it is perfectly possible to imagine a universe in which any act of counting be a being in it annihilated some members of the class counted during the time and only during the time of its continuance."

17Wednesday AMalthus, 1478 Gary Hosler Meisters, 1932

-A.N.

Whitehead, Mathematics, Ency. Brit. 13th edn.

ST. VALENTINE'S DAY

14Sunday

18ThursdayCount Volta, 1795

15M ondayA.N. Whitehead, 1861 Douglas Hofstadter, 1945

19FridayCopernicus, 1473

16Tuesday

20Saturday

S T A R T

E N D

Ae

VERTICAL FLIPPER 1

FEBRUARY"...the apriority of time does not only qualify the properties of arithmetic as synthetic a priori judgements, but is oes the same for those of geometry, and not only for elementary two- and three-dimensional geometry, but for non-Eucledian and ndimensional geometries as well. For since Descartes we have learned to reduce all these geometries to arithmetic by means of the calculus of coordinates." -L.E.J. Brouwer. Bull. Amer. Soc. 20. 1913, p. 8 5.

ASH WEDNESDAY

24Wednesday

25ThursdayGEORGE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

22.M onday

H. Hertz, 1857 George Washington, 1732Arthur Schopenhauer, 1788

26Friday

Tuesday

FEBRUARY MARCH 3"Projective geometry is all geometry."-Arthur Cayley.

WednesdaGeorg Cantor, 1845 Wenesdy Alexander Bell, 1114!,

28SundayLinus Pauling, 1901

4ThursdayGeorge Gamow, 1904

2TuesdayI

6SaturdayI

s

T R T

opf

E N DTHE REPEAT GAME

MARCHThere are 43,252,003,274,498,856,000 (over 43 U.S. billion billion) attainable positions. This number is so large that if you could see a new position every second, it would take over 1,000 billion years to see them all! The age of the universe is estimated to be only 12-20 billion years.

11Thursday

12Monday Friday

13Tuesday Saturday

MARCHIf we placed a living organism in a box... one could arrange the organism, after any arbitrary flight, could be returned to its original spot in scarcely altered condition... for the moving organism the lengthy time of the journey was a mere instant, provided the motion took place with approximately the speed of -Albert Einstein. Mathematical Theory of Relativity. Cesellsch. in Zurich, 56, 1911, p.52.

ST. PATRICK'S DAY

17Wednesday

14,SundayIDES OF MARCH Albert Einstein, 1879

18Thursday

15Monday

19FridaySpring Begins

16Tuesday7 George S. OhmL=S

20Saturday

S

T R T

E N DCHECKERBOARD

MARCH"It is remarkable that a science which began with the consideration of games of chance should have become the most important object of human knowledge."-

24Wednesday

Laplace.

21

Sunday ,Sunday

Jean Baptiste, 1768Joseph Fourier, 1768

J.S. Bach, 1684

,sBc,18

25Thursday

22Monday

26Friday

23iTuesdayPierre-Simon de Laplace, 1749

MARCHOn aggregate of straight lines being represented as very narrow rectangles (linelets): "it comes to the same result whichever way you take it!"L.

APRIL 31WednesdayALL FOOLS DAY Rene Descartes, 1598

Barrow. Lectiones Geometricae 1735.

28Sunday

1Thursday

29Monday

2Friday

30TuesdayI

3

Saturday

STmmml*

R T

04

Ee N D %UPS WINGER 2

APRIL"Nobody has ever noticed a place except at a time, or a time except at a place."H. Minkowski, The Principle of Relativity. London, 1920, PALM SUNDAY

7Wednesday lPassover Begins Charles Fourier, 1772

4Sunday

8ThursdayGOOD FRIDAY

9Monday

Friday

10TuesdaySaturday

APRIL"...the velocity of sound may be for the bees the same universal constant as is the velocity of light in man's electromagnetic philosophy."-

14Wednesday

H. von Foerster. Cybernetics. 1951.

EASTER SUNDAY

11Sunday

15Thursday sday uLeonard Vinci, 1452 Leonardo da Euler, 1707

12Monday

16,Friday

Wilbur Wright, 1867

13Tuesday

17Saturday

THE TWELVE CUBE WORLDS

APRIL"One cannot assign a relation in space to what is determined only in time." -I. Kant. Sommti. Werke. V.10, p.112, 1839.

21WednesdayImmanuel Kant, 1724

22Sunday Thursday

19MondayFridayWm. Shakespeare, 1564

20Tuesday

24Saturday

APRIL

MAY 28W.TednesdayI.Newton pubi. Principia, ^1686

"The moving finger writes; and having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety or Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it."

25Sunday

29ThursdayHenri Poincare, 1854

26MondayDavid Hume, 1711

30FridayCarl Friedrich Gauss, 1777

27TuesdaySamuel Morse, 1791

1

Saturday

Pierre T DeChardin, 1831

MAY"Now I maintain that, if he had lived forever, and not wearied of the task, then, even if his life had continued as eventfully as it began, no part of his biography would have remained unwritten."- Bertrand Russel. The Principles of Mathematics. 1937, on Sterne's Tristram Shandy Paradox.

5Wednesday

2Sunday

6Thursday

3Monday

7FridayPeter I Tchaikovsky, 1849

4Tuesday

8Saturday

MAY"Our consciousness weaves a route at random along the ever-branching evolutionary pathway of the cosmos, so it is we, rather than God, who are

12Wednesday

playing dice."MOTHER'S DAY

- Paul Davies. Other Worlds.

9Sunday

13Thursday

10 Monday

14FridayGabriel Farenheit, 1686

11Tuesday

15SaturdayPierre Curie, 1859

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