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Drinking-related lifestyle influences on Victorians alcohol consumptionQuantitative research report

www.vichealth.vic.gov.au

RMIT University

Published by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation September 2013

Publication number: K-078-AT

This report, prepared for VicHealth by RMIT University, presents findings from stage two of a two-stage research study.

Suggested citationVicHealth 2013, Drinking-related lifestyle influences on Victorians alcohol consumption (quantitative research report), Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Melbourne, Australia.

Drinking-related lifestyle influences on Victorians alcohol consumption

Quantitative research report

Prepared for VicHealth

Acknowledgements This report was prepared for VicHealth in 2013. It was jointly developed by Associate Professor Mike Reid, Professor Francis Farrelly, Professor Lisa Farrell and Professor Tim Fry (RMIT University School of Economics, Finance and Marketing), and Professor Tony Worsley (Deakin University School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences).

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Contents

Executive summary ........................................................................................................................... 5

1.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 11

1.1 Background ............................................................................................................................ 11

1.2 Importance of understanding alcohol use and abuse ............................................................. 12

1.3 Importance of consumer segmentation ................................................................................. 14

1.4 A consumption-related approach to lifestyle segmentation ................................................... 15

2.0 Research aims and objectives .................................................................................................... 18

2.1 Methodology ......................................................................................................................... 18

2.2 Measurement ........................................................................................................................ 19

2.3 Segmentation process ............................................................................................................ 23

3.0 Overall influences on problem drinking ...................................................................................... 25

3.1 Drivers of drinking frequency ................................................................................................. 25

3.2 Away-from-home drinking ..................................................................................................... 26

3.3 In-home drinking ................................................................................................................... 28

3.4 Drivers of alcohol disorder ..................................................................................................... 29

3.5 Drivers of negative personal consequences (violence)............................................................ 31

3.6 Drivers of negative personal consequences (life functioning) ................................................. 32

3.7 Propensity to drink at celebrations ........................................................................................ 33

3.8 Propensity to drink at events ................................................................................................. 35

3.9 Propensity to drink at home and with family members .......................................................... 36

3.10 Summary of overall drivers .................................................................................................. 37

4.0 Comparative analysis of drinking segments ................................................................................ 41

4.1 Demographic profile .............................................................................................................. 42

4.2 Segment beliefs about alcohol consumption .......................................................................... 45

4.3 Segment drinking frequency .................................................................................................. 46

4.4 Segment at-home and away-from-home drinking .................................................................. 47

4.5 Segment alcohol disorder ...................................................................................................... 49

4.6 Segment propensity to drink in particular situations .............................................................. 49

4.7 Segment personal values and drinking ................................................................................... 51

4.8 Segment motives for drinking ................................................................................................ 52

4.9 Segment purchasing and shopping for alcohol ....................................................................... 53

4.10 Segment product-related attributes ..................................................................................... 55 3

4.11 Media use ............................................................................................................................ 56

4.12 Comparative drivers of drinking behaviour........................................................................... 57

5.0 Summary and implications ......................................................................................................... 62

5.1 Messages using personal values ............................................................................................. 63

5.2 Messages using drinking motives ........................................................................................... 64

5.3 Message using alcohol purchasing and attributes................................................................... 66

5.4 Implications for media messages ........................................................................................... 68

5.5 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................. 72

Bibliography and references ............................................................................................................ 75

Questionnaire ................................................................................................................................. 80

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Executive summary

Introduction

Alcohol is a major part of the cultural fabric of many western countries and often plays an integral

role in many peoples social lives. The significant impact of social and health problems associated

with excessive alcohol consumption, both at a personal and societal level, have become a central

focus of governments.

Victorian culture has a high tolerance for alcohol consumption and an acceptance of heavy drinking

across an extensive range of social contexts. Drinking is inextricably linked with the cultural and

social life of Victorians; it is multifaceted and entrenched in nearly every area of our lives, with

rituals and habits providing structure, comfort and a sense of belonging.

While understanding single-act behaviours such as binge drinking is important, arguably more

important is understanding the deeper lifestyle-related connections to alcohol consumption and

how lifestyle and culture can shape problem drinking and associated behaviours. Similarly, there

needs to be a focus on alcohol consumption and problem drinking amongst the broader population

as well as an understanding of specific sub-cultures and population groups such as youth.

Aims and approach

This research adopts and implements a drinking-related lifestyle (DRL) framework to understand and

determine how best to target and influence specific Victorian drinker segments through improved

media- and message-based activities about reducing alcohol consumption. Overall, the aims of this

report are to:

1. implement a DRL framework and profile drinker types based on a meansend chain

approach incorporating values, lifestyle and behavioural similarities

2. examine identified segments and model each to understand the values and lifestyle drivers

of drinking styles and behaviour that are similar and unique to particular segments

3. extend alcohol drinking segment profiles to include traditional, electronic and social media

preferences to better target communications (channels and messages) including word-of-

mouth strategies.

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The data for this study were obtained through a quantitative online survey. The target respondents

were active Victorian drinkers but not necessarily problem or excessive drinkers. To qualify for

participation, each individual had to be an active drinker and have consumed alcohol at a frequency

of between every day and once per month over the previous year. A total of 2500 completed online

surveys were obtained. The survey questions were based on pre-existing scales and modified where

appropriate. Several were dev